Museo Correr, Venice

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Museo Correr.

    by breughel Written Jul 23, 2010

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Doge.

    This was our second visit to the Museo Correr. The first visit going back to the early nineties had not really fulfilled us with enthusiasm; this visit was better because a new room has been opened i.e. "the Sansovino library" which is interesting.
    The museum is a classic of Venice because it is located in the Procuratie Nuove which was designed by the architect Vincenzo Scamozzi (1552-1616) and once housed some of the most important civic authorities within the Republic of Venice. It is interesting to visit these rooms which now contain collections documenting various aspects of Venetian History.
    Actually we started our visit by the Museo Correr because you can buy here a combined ticket (San Marco Museum Plus) for the Doge's Palace without queuing. The entrance is by the Napoleonic wing from 1810 closing the west side of Piazza San Marco. The Neo-classical rooms are supposed to be "sumptuous" what is not really what my wife and I felt even if there are sculptures from Antonio Canova.
    The historical part on the first floor is interesting especially if it is your first visit to Venice. You will see, mostly from paintings, documents and objects what the doges and public institutions looked like, what where the naval achievements (the Lepante victory against the Turks) and local festivities of the Serenissima Republic.
    It's a good introduction to the visit of the Doge's Palace.
    On the second floor are shown many paintings from the Venetian school with a number of masterpieces, several Bellini's and the Vittore Carpaccio's "Two Venetian Noblewomen" (The Courtesans).

    Open: 9 - 19 h (1/04 - 31/10); 10 - 17 h (1/11 - 31/03)
    Price: see my tip on combined ticket San Marco Museum Plus (13 €, reduced 7,50 €) for 5 museums.
    There is a cafeteria where we got a "spremuta di arrancia" fresh pressed oranges at the very reasonable price of 4,50 €.
    No air conditioning.
    Photos not allowed.

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    Museo Civico Correr

    by Fam.Rauca Written Oct 24, 2005

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    Museo Civico Correr
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    After several years, the doors were opened, that separated the Museo Civico Correr of the Museo Archeologico and the Biblioteca Marciana.
    Today, visitors can view the entire complex that includes the upper floors of the Procuratie Nuove and the Libreria Sansoviniana.
    The basic stick of the museum forms Teodoro Corrers collection from the 18th century.
    It gives, primarily, information about the city history of Venice in the 16th and 17th century.
    To the continuance is fitting however also a painting gallery in the upper floor, a hall with sculptures by Antonio Canova and more magnificent areas with gaze on the piazza.
    It follows the Greek and the Roman department of the archaeological museum and in the connection at it, the impressive areas of the Biblioteca Marciana.
    A beautiful blanket with allegorical paintings arches over the old handwritings and books.
    The way leads back into the Museo Correr that shows in the last part of exhibits to Venetian parties and games as well as information over the merchant guilds.

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    Museo Correr

    by jlee008 Written Nov 24, 2004

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    The Correr Museum first began in 1830 when Teodoro Correr donated his art collection to the city of Venice. Since then, there have been many other acquisitions that have expanded the collection.

    The collection of art housed here is second only to the Accademia in all of Venice, so it is definately worth a visit. It's most famous painting is Young Man in a Red Hat - Gallery's by Carpaccio dated around 1490. There is also the painting Two Venetian Ladies or Two Courtesans (also by Carpaccio), dated 1507, that deserves a look.

    Also, the ticket that gets you into the Correr is also the ticket that lets you into Doge's Palace. Many people will often goto Doge's Palace first because it is such a popular attraction. However, if you hate to waste time, like myself, I suggest you goto the Correr first. Once you purchase the combination ticket, you won't have to wait in long queues to get into Doge's Palace. Of course, if you are traveling in the low tourist season, this is not as much of an issue. Even in the early tourist month, like mid-May, I still found pretty long lines mid-morning.

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    Museo Correr

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated May 23, 2006

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    Museo Correr: the entrance
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    The Correr Museum is probably one of the best museum of all Venice. Born of the collection donated to the city of Venice in 1830 by Teodoro Correr, the Museum has grown in the years and noe it is one of the most important museums of the town. The first area you see during your itinerary in the museum is the Napoleonic Wing, in the splendid Neo-classical Rooms which became, after the fall of the Republic (1797), the Venetian Royal Palace of the French, the Asburgo, and the Kings of Italy (1866). The exposition continues in the halls of the Procuratie Nuove: in the wide halls you can learn more about the various aspects of Venetian civilisation and the collections of ancient art are displayed.
    The Correr Museum done very interesting temporary exhibitions, the last was Turner at Venice.

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    Museo Correr

    by Jefie Updated Aug 28, 2010

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    Statue located in front of the Procuratie Nuove
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    Since our museum pass gave us access to the Museo Correr, we decided to go for a quick visit, which turned out to be a fairly long one because there's quite a lot to see there! The entrance to the museum is located in the Napoleonic wing of the Procuratie buildings on Piazza San Marco, thus called because Napoleon, during the time he reigned over Italy, intended to use it as a royal palace. The monumental staircase that leads to the entrance of the museum gives a good indication of what the palace might have looked like had Napoleon's plans been completed. Museo Correr opened in 1922, taking up the first and second floor of the Napoleonic wing and extending into Procuratie Nuove. It presents the amazing private collection of Teodoro Correr who bequeated his possessions to the city upon his death in 1830. Correr's collection includes several historical artefacts and documents, as well as an impressive collection of Gothic, Renaissance and Neoclassical sculptures and paintings. Some of the museum's most famous pieces include Carpaccio's "Portrait of Man with Red Beret" and Canova's "Daedalus and Icarus". Taken together, they pay a nice tribute to Venice's history and culture, allowing visitors to discover the city under a different angle.

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    Correr Museo

    by BruceDunning Updated May 31, 2008

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    Information of Correr and Ca Oro

    Teodoro Correr is responsible for creating the museum and the many treasures it holds. He was born in Venice in 1750, and worked as an administrative official. Most of his life his ambition was to collect valuable and antique pieces. The city of Venice started the exhibits of the collection in 1922, and it is mostly laid out in the Napoleonic wing. The museum has three parts, including the collections in the main museum, archeological and Biblioteca Marciana. The Correr section contains a huge impressive ballroom and throne room on the first level. The next level holds coinage, armory, information of the life of Venice during its sea empire, and many art works and statues form the 14th century through 18th century. The archeological section has Greek and Roman collections. The Biblioteca has many religious order items and and paintings and books of that order.
    Opening times are 9-7 end of March to early November. Use of the Venice museum pass for 18 Euro allows entry along with Doges and a number of other museums.

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    St. Marks Square

    by ophiro Updated Jun 8, 2005

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    St. Marks Square

    St. Marks Square is always full with tourists and pigeons.
    You can see here the beautiful St. Marks Basilica , the doges palace and Museo Correr.

    You can feed the pigeons (there are places where you can buy food) , sit in front of the church and enjoy the atmosphere.

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    Museo Correr

    by lina112 Written Sep 4, 2008

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    Abbot Teodoro Correr donated his collection of works in 1830, Correr museum is the municipal museum of Venice. Contains documents, paints, ancient objets and maps that reflects the history and life of Venice through years.

    Abbot Tedoro Correr donó su colección de obras en 1830, de ahí su nombre, es el museo municipal de Venecia. Contiene documentos, pinturas, objetos antiguos y mapas que reflejan la historia y la vida de venecia a través de los años.

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    Museo Civico Correr – Part I

    by aliante1981 Written Dec 13, 2003

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    Born from the collection that Teodoro Correr donated to the city of Venice in year 1830, the museum was further enriched by the people who followed Correr’s noble example. You should certainly spend some time there – a couple of hours to explore everything should do, so I reckon. The ticket’s cumulative with the Palace of the Doges’ and some other sights.

    Housed in the Neoclassical rooms of the Ala Napoleonica (or the palatial wing that Napoleon added to the buildings), the first part of the vast collection comprises, among others, statues and bas-reliefs by Antonio Canova, among which Dedalo e Icaro (1778-1779) – a classic ancient Greek story of a father and a son who tried to fly.

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    Overhead of Piazza San Marco

    by acemj Written Sep 12, 2002

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    As you can see from this picture, St. Mark's Square isn't actually square. It fans out and widens at the end closest to the church which creates the illusion that the space is larger than it really is. The buildings surrounding the square include the Museo Correr and the Biblioteca Nazionale Sansoviniana, but what you'll probably remember most about the square is the pigeons! Thousands of them flock here and offer some great photo opportunities.

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  • Piazza di San Marco

    by vallarta Written Oct 3, 2003

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    The Museo Correr runs the length of two sides of the piazza, and tells the story of Venice's history and present-day culture. Included in the museum are the crimson robes of the doges, rare maps of the city, election documents, historic Italian coins, a library of ancient tomes, Venetian and oriental spears and armor, and models of the galleys that once scouted this empire. The upper level is home to an art gallery that includes Crucifixion by Giovanni Bellini, The Courtesans by Carpaccio, and other important Italian works of art.

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    Museo Correr

    by TexasDave Written Mar 16, 2013
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    Originally built to be an apartment for Napoleon, it is now one of the Civic Museums of Venice. If you buy a ticket to enter the Doge's Palace after 3:00 pm, admission to the Correr Museum is included. It's not very large but has interesting things from Venice's and Northern Italy's past.

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    Correr Museum

    by Imbi Written Dec 23, 2002

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    The Correr Museum, is also in Piazza San Marco, part of the circuit of city museums. This museum is dedicated to the history and culture of the city, and also has other exhibits.

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