Ponte dei Sospiri, Venice

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Ponte dei Sospiri - SAN MARCO

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    Ponte dei Sospiri
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    Ponte dei Sospiri
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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Bridge over waters

    by BruceDunning Updated May 28, 2008

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    We took some bridges and hugged the walls along the canals to keep track from where we came to know where we were going. We did get lost, though. The directions we saw dusk, and then returning at dark was fun, but kind of scary not knowing how lost you may be, as to when you may recognize a landmark and know how to get out of the maze.
    I suppose if you get to a bigger channel of water, you then know you are at a large canal before it enters the sea. The sites in deeper into the enclave are wonderful. Locals are doing their usual thing and it is enjoyable to see them go about their daily tasks and shopping.

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    Puente de los suspiros / Bridge of Sighs

    by elpariente Written May 20, 2008

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    Parece ser que fue Lord Byron en el siglo XIX , el que le dió este nombre al puente y no por un motivo romántico , sino que es aquí donde los prisioneros , suspiraban , al ver por última vez el agua del río de Palazzo y la luz del cielo , antes de abandonar los tribunales del Palacio Ducal y pasar a las prisiones de Piombi , donde les metían en unos pozos (pozzi) lúgubres e insalubres que estaban debajo del techo sobre una lámina de plomo ( Piombo)


    It seems that Lord Byron was in the nineteenth century, who gave the name to the bridge , more than for a romantic occasion, because here is where the prisoners, sigh, seeing for the last time the Palazzo river and the day light , before leaving the courts of the Ducal Palace and as they were moving to the Piombi prison, where they were put in some wells (Pozzi) , ghastly and unhealthy that were below the ceiling under a sheet of lead (Piombo)

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  • ealgisi's Profile Photo

    Ponte dei Sospiri

    by ealgisi Written Apr 30, 2008

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    The bridge passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons with the interrogation rooms.

    Convicts had the last view of Venice before their imprisonment from this bridge.

    His name has been given by Lord Byron and comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of the city.

    There's a local legend saying that lovers will be assured eternal love if they kiss on a gondola at sunset under the bridge.

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by wilocrek Written Mar 31, 2008

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    The real name of this bridge is "Ponte dei Sospiri", but as American tourists continue to over run Venice the name of this bridge had been bastardized to what we all know as the Bridge of Sighs. it crosses the Rio di Palazzo and connects the Doge's Palace with the prison. It is a very narrow crossing that will leave you at the other side, breathing a "sigh" of relief...........

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    Bridge Of Sighs

    by darkjedi Written Mar 24, 2008

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    The Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri) is one of many bridges in Venice. The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace.

    The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice out the window before being taken down to their cells. In reality, the days of inquisitions and summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built, and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals.

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    Bridge of Sighs

    by sim1 Updated Feb 17, 2008

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    The bridge Ponte dei Sospiri / Bridge of Sighs



    The bridge that speaks to the imagination..... The name 'Bridge of Sighs' was invented in the 19th Century, when Lord Byron helped to popularize the belief that the bridge's name was inspired by the sighs of condemned prisoners as they were led through it to the executioner. (In reality, the days of inquisitions and summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built, and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals.)

    Photo: The bridge Ponte dei Sospiri (Bridge of Sighs) from Ponte della Paglia.

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    Ponte dei Sospiri | The Bridge of Sighs (V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Feb 8, 2008

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    The Bridge of Sighs and Ponte della Paglia behind

    The Bridge of Sighs is one of the best known artifacts in Venice. There is no a single tourist who visited Venice and failed to see the Bridge of Sighs. This bridge, connecting Palazzo Ducale – Doge's Palace and Prigioni Nuove – the New Prisons, was built in the first decade of the 17th century and it is work of Antonio Contin. The idea that prisoners sighed at their last glimpse of Venice as they passed before the windows of the Bridge of Sighs is a Romantic fancy of the 19th century.

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  • olgaehr's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by olgaehr Updated Nov 28, 2007

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    Don't be fooled by it's beauty outside, this bridge got it's name for a reason. Connecting Doge Palace and the Cities Prison, was used to take prisoners from prison to the palace for trials and the other way around.

    You will get to walk on it when you visit Doge Palace and it will take you directly to the depressing prison. The prison is a scary sight just imagining all the prisoners in those tiny, dirty cold cells.

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    Ponte dei sospiri

    by ruki Updated Sep 7, 2007

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    This bridge is connecting Doges' Palace and Prigioni Nuove (the New Prisons) and it was built in the first decade of the 17The. The name "Bridge of Sighs" inspirited by Lord Byron but it was so named for the “sighs of pain” from prisoners who was crossing from the palace to the prison. When they were crossing they were looking the sea and the freedom for the last time.

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jun 25, 2007

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    Built in 1600 to connect the Doge's prison with the palace's inquisitor roomis the Bridge of Sighs. The popular belief is that it is called thus because of the sighs of the prisoners when they were led over it.

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    Ponte dei Sospiri or the Bridge of Sighs

    by BorneoGrrl Updated Jun 10, 2007

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    the Bridge of Sighs

    Ponte dei Sospiri or the Bridge of Sighs was built over the Rio di Palazzo to connect the Doge's prisons with the inquisitor's rooms in the Doge's Palace. Though erected in the 17th century, it only got its name in the 19th century after Lord Byron's famous reference in his poem.

    It was believed that as the condemned crossed the bridge, he would have his last view of the beautiful lagoons and freedom, thus the reference to "sighs"

    It costs nothing to view the bridge from the outside and a local legend says that lovers will be assured of eternal love upon kissing under the bridge on a gondola at sunset. To me, I think it's another tourist trap :-)

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  • paragianna75's Profile Photo

    the bridge of Sighs

    by paragianna75 Written Apr 19, 2007

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    Venice has over than 400 bridges.One of them, maybe the most famous one is the bridge of Sighs that conects the Doges Palace with the prison.It took its name from the sighs of the politicians that were convicted by the council of Ten and were passing the bridge to go to the prison cells.

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    Ponte dei Sospiri

    by MikeAtSea Written Nov 3, 2006

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    Sospiri Bridge

    The bridge was constructed in the 17th century with two internal passageways. The bridge leads to the New and Old Prisons, the latter called pozzi (wells).
    A little window looks out over the Basin of St Mark offering a picturesque view of the Island of San Giorgio.

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  • artonice's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by artonice Written Aug 28, 2006

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    This Bridge was built in 1600's and this was the last place that prisoners could see Venice.
    We didn't see inside cause we had a limitede time.

    However if you want to see the inside you have to book a Doge's Palace tour.This 90-minute tour is conducted in Italian; it also includes the prisons, torture chambers, and other rooms that normally aren't open to visitors. From June through September, tours are scheduled daily except Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and noon. Reserve at least a day in advance, since the number of visitors is limited.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    The Bridge of sighs

    by traveloturc Updated Aug 26, 2006

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    ponte dei sospiri

    The Bridge of Sighs('Ponte dei Sospiri' in Italian) received its name in the 17th century, because the prisoners who passed through it on their way to the prison cells on the other side would most likely see the beautiful sight of the lagoon and the island of S.Giorgio and freedom for the last time.The bridge connects the Dogos Palace and the prison. The jail is very famous because In this Jail Casanova and Galileo Galilei spent part of their lives.

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