Ponte dei Sospiri, Venice

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Ponte dei Sospiri - SAN MARCO

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jun 25, 2007

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    Built in 1600 to connect the Doge's prison with the palace's inquisitor roomis the Bridge of Sighs. The popular belief is that it is called thus because of the sighs of the prisoners when they were led over it.

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    Ponte dei Sospiri or the Bridge of Sighs

    by BorneoGrrl Updated Jun 10, 2007

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    Ponte dei Sospiri or the Bridge of Sighs was built over the Rio di Palazzo to connect the Doge's prisons with the inquisitor's rooms in the Doge's Palace. Though erected in the 17th century, it only got its name in the 19th century after Lord Byron's famous reference in his poem.

    It was believed that as the condemned crossed the bridge, he would have his last view of the beautiful lagoons and freedom, thus the reference to "sighs"

    It costs nothing to view the bridge from the outside and a local legend says that lovers will be assured of eternal love upon kissing under the bridge on a gondola at sunset. To me, I think it's another tourist trap :-)

    the Bridge of Sighs
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    the bridge of Sighs

    by paragianna75 Written Apr 19, 2007

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    Venice has over than 400 bridges.One of them, maybe the most famous one is the bridge of Sighs that conects the Doges Palace with the prison.It took its name from the sighs of the politicians that were convicted by the council of Ten and were passing the bridge to go to the prison cells.

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    Ponte dei Sospiri

    by MikeAtSea Written Nov 3, 2006

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    The bridge was constructed in the 17th century with two internal passageways. The bridge leads to the New and Old Prisons, the latter called pozzi (wells).
    A little window looks out over the Basin of St Mark offering a picturesque view of the Island of San Giorgio.

    Sospiri Bridge
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    Bridge of Sighs

    by artonice Written Aug 28, 2006

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    This Bridge was built in 1600's and this was the last place that prisoners could see Venice.
    We didn't see inside cause we had a limitede time.

    However if you want to see the inside you have to book a Doge's Palace tour.This 90-minute tour is conducted in Italian; it also includes the prisons, torture chambers, and other rooms that normally aren't open to visitors. From June through September, tours are scheduled daily except Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and noon. Reserve at least a day in advance, since the number of visitors is limited.

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    The Bridge of sighs

    by traveloturc Updated Aug 26, 2006

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    The Bridge of Sighs('Ponte dei Sospiri' in Italian) received its name in the 17th century, because the prisoners who passed through it on their way to the prison cells on the other side would most likely see the beautiful sight of the lagoon and the island of S.Giorgio and freedom for the last time.The bridge connects the Dogos Palace and the prison. The jail is very famous because In this Jail Casanova and Galileo Galilei spent part of their lives.

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    Bridge of Sighs

    by rcsparty Written Aug 7, 2006

    The bridge of sighs connects the Doges Palace with the prison behind. The prisoners would cross the bridge and get their last glimpse of the city, before entering the prison. Both Casanova and Galileo crossed the bridge into the prison beyond.

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    the bridge of sighs

    by doug48 Updated Jul 30, 2006

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    this is the bridge that connects venice's prison to the court rooms in the doge's palace. this bridge was so named because prisoners would "sigh" when they crossed the bridge on their way to the torture chamber. worth booking is the "secret itineraries" tour. it must be booked in advance at the palace or by phone 041 522 49 51

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    Ponte di sospiri ( bridge of sighs and shame )

    by hundwalder Updated Jul 30, 2006

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    I call it the bridge of shame and injustice. This 400 year old bridge connects the Palazzo Ducale with the dungeons on the other side of the small canal. Accused criminals received a fair trial ( and hippos can fly ) in the palace of the Doges and then were immediately hustled across this bridge into the dungeons or the gallows. In many cases when they looked out of the disgustingly ornate windows it was their last glimpse of anything other than dungeon walls.

    Notice the intricate designs on and of the bridge and its superb craftsmanship. Who were they trying to impress ? It made me wonder how many of the hapless petty criminals who were herded across this bridge of shame had earlier put so much effort into building either it or the palace of vanity connected to it. I enjoyed seeing the great architecture of Venice, and while doing so, thought of the craftsmen who created it, and not those whose vanity it was built to inflate.

    Give this tip a bad rating if you find it offensive. Sorry but I need to vent off steam somewhere.

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    Ponte della Paglia

    by rubbersoul75 Written Jun 16, 2006

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    This photo was taken from the Vapporetto. You can see the Ponte della Paglia, with the Bridge of Sighs behind it.

    Originally built in 1360, the current one was constructed in the mid 1800’s.
    From the Ponte della Paglia you’ve got a nice view of the bridge of Sighs on one side, and the waters of the lagoon & San Giorgio Maggiore on the other.

    Doges palace on the left
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    Bridge of Sighs (ponte dei Sospiri)

    by rubbersoul75 Written Jun 16, 2006

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    Probably the 2nd most popular bridge in Venice, behind the Rialto. You wouldn’t want to be walking this bridge a few hundred years ago- it links the Judges rooms of the Doges palace, to the Prison.

    Condemned prisoners would cross the bridge and “sigh” as they took in their last views of Venice from the bridges windows. You can cross the bridge with the tour of Doges Palace.

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    Ponte dei Sospiri (Bridge of Sighs)

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated May 22, 2006

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    The Ponte dei Sospiri (Bridge of Sighs) is one of the most nice place of Venice. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace.
    The bridge was built in the 16th century and only given the name Bridge of Sighs in the 19th century, by Lord Byron. The name comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice out the window before being taken down to their cells.

    Ponte dei Sospiri Ponte dei Sospiri: view Ponte dei Sospiri Ponte dei Sospiri
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    Ponte del Sospiri - the bridge of Sighs.

    by cheapskate Written Feb 18, 2006

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    Check out the famed Bridge of Sighs. Made famous by Charles Dicken's novel, 'The Merchant of Venice'. If you intend to visit the Duke's Palace, don't forget to walk across it.

    How did the bridge get its name?
    Well.. This is the bridge that connect the Palazzo to the prison, so prisoners are brought across this bridge before they're put into their cells. The bridge is entirely enclosed, except for a couple of windows on each side. When the prisoners walk across the bridge, they take their last glimpse of the beautiful canal and sigh.. resigned to their fate. So there..

    View from the outside... About the bridge Inside the bridge Last glimpse of the outside world
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    Bridge of Sighs

    by kph100 Written Jan 21, 2006

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    The bridge of sighs links the Doges palace with the prisons and was built in 1600 and takes its name by tradition from the lamentations of the prisoners as they were led off to the cells.

    Access to the bridge internally is by the Doges Palace tour, but externally its viewed from the Ponte della Paglia located on the promenade of Riva degli Schiavoni.

    Ponte della Paglia behind the bridge of sighs Ponte della Paglia from bridge of sighs
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    BRIDGE OF DEATH

    by whitecliff62 Updated Jan 11, 2006

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    This is the famous bridge of sighs or known localy as ponte de sospiri. It was built in the year 1600 by Antonio contino and its aim was to connect the doge's prisons, or prigioni, with the inquistor's rooms in the main palace. Lord byron helped to popularize the belief that the bridges name was inspired by the sighs of condemned prisoners as they were led through it to there deaths. But actually the truth is, by the time the bridge was finally built the days of the executions were over and the cells wher occupied by petty criminals. You can get a guided tour of the bridge and the Doge's whice you can book by appointment, it takes about 90 mins and includes the prisons, torcher chambers, and the other rooms that normally aren't open to visitors, this is normally open daily from june to september. Please book at least 2 days in advance because the number of visitors is limited.

    BRIDGE OF SIGHS
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