Scuola Grande di San Rocco, Venice

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  • Looking up (Nov 05)
    Looking up (Nov 05)
    by MM212
  • Scuola di San Rocco from a distance (Nov 05)
    Scuola di San Rocco from a distance (Nov...
    by MM212
  • Chiesa di San Rocco next to la Scuola (Nov 05)
    Chiesa di San Rocco next to la Scuola...
    by MM212
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    Scuola Grande di San Rocco

    by MM212 Updated Aug 23, 2009

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    Founded in 1478 by benevolent Venetians as a Catholic Confraternity, la Scuola Grande di San Rocco takes its name from the neighbouring Chiesa di San Rocco. The actual building was commissioned in the 16th century and built in a Renaissance style with an intricately decorated, polychrome marble façade. The design was the work of several architects, including Bartolomeo Bon, who also worked on la Chiesa di San Rocco. The famous Venetian artist, Jacopo Tintoretto was assigned the work of decorating its sumptuous interior. Nowadays, la Scuola Grande di San Rocco is a museum containing masterpieces by the same artist Jacopo Tintoretto.

    Scuola di San Rocco from a distance (Nov 05) Fa��ade of Scuola Grande di San Rocco (Nov 05) Looking up (Nov 05) Chiesa di San Rocco next to la Scuola (Nov 05)
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    "Tintoretto's Sistine Chapel" PART I (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Jan 5, 2009

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    Scuola Grande di San Rocco, the best preserved of Venice's six Scuole Grandi – Major Guilds, was founded in the late 15th century and dedicated to San Rocco – St Roch of Montpelier. The works on building of the Scuola Grande started in 1517 and lasted until 1560. Due to disagreements with the clients, Bartolomeo Bon who designed the building, abandoned supervising of its realization in 1524. He was succeeded by Sante Lombardo, later by Antonio Abbondi called Scarpagnino and Giangiacomo dei Girgi.

    After winning the competition (not exactly in manner of fair-play), in 1564, four years after the building was finished, Jakopo Robusti called Tintoretto started one of the most amazing pictorial undertakings in whole history of art – he commissioned paintings for Scuola Grande di San Rocco until 1588!

    The earliest paintings are in Sala dell'Albergo (Hall of the Hostel). Among them are the 1st painted for the Scuola Grande – "The Apotheosis of St Roch", "The Ascent to Calvary", magnificent "Christ before Pilate", "Crucifixion" (1224 cm wide and 536 cm high)…

    To be continued in PART II…

    Scuola Grande di San Rocco Entrance to Scuola Grande di San Rocco
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    "Tintoretto's Sistine Chapel" PART II (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Mar 7, 2008

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    […] In the largest, Sala Superiore (Upper Hall), Tintoretto decorated ceiling with the paintings representing the scenes from the Old Testament ("The Brazen Serpent", "The Fall of Man", "Moses Drawing Water from the Rock", "The Miracle of Manna"…). His paintings on the walls of this hall depict the scenes from the life of Christ ("Adoration of the Shepherds", "Baptism of Christ", "The Last Supper", "The Resurrection of Christ"…).

    In 17th century Francesco Pianta the Younger completed a series of twelve allegorical wooden figures – caryatids set along the walls of Upper Hall. One of them, "Allegory of Art", is portrait of Tintoretto as a defender of painting.

    To be continued in PART III…

    Scuola Grande di San Rocco Entrance to Scoula Grande di San Rocco
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    "Tintoretto's Sistine Chapel" PART III (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Nov 16, 2007

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    […] Sala Inferiore or Sala Terrena (Ground Floor Hall) paintings present scenes from life of Virgin Mary – "Annunciation", "Adoration of the Magi", "The Massacre of the Innocents"… and the last one painted for the Scuola Grande – "The Circumcision". Two exceptions of the theme are beautiful "St Mary Magdalene" and "St Mary of Egypt", both neither mentioned in documents of the Scuola Grande nor in any other 15th and 16th century guide or document.

    Among the paintings of Scuola Grande di San Rocco is an early Titian masterpiece – "Christ Carrying the Cross", and paintings made by Antonio Zanchi ("The Virgin Appears to the Plague Victims"), Pietro Negri ("Madonna Saves Venice from the Plague of 1630"), Giovanni Battista Tiepolo ("Abraham Praying before the Three Angels"), Bernardo Strozzi ("St Roch")…

    Scuola Grande di San Rocco is unique treasure of Venice and it should not be missed.

    Scuola Grande di San Rocco Scuola Grande di San Rocco
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    Scuola Grande di Rocco

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 17, 2007

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    Not a big one for art galleries but we made a point of visiting this one during our 2005 visit - another VT tip kindled my interest in it plus its a good place to escape the midday sun in the height of summer. The Scuola Grande di Rocco is a beautiful building externally with its columns and coloured marble inserts and its profusions odf decorations - see if you can spot the elephants like we did (click for extra pics please). Made a change from lions!
    Inside the walls are dedicated to the masterpieces of Tintoretto - huge biblical scenes which were of great interest to us - his main masterpiece is the crucifxion scene. The ceilings are high and the rooms huge - we were glad to make use of the mirrors to stop us craning our necks.
    There is an entrance fee - 6 euros I think - but we were glad to visit this one.

    outside Scola Grande di Rocco coloured marbles and columns elephamt sculpture inside view masterpiece of Tintoretto
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    Two Marys in Tintoretto Heaven

    by JetlagCity Updated Mar 23, 2005

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    The Scuola Grande di San Rocco is filled to the brim with Tintorettos, and a richly vibrant "Annunciation" by Titian, too. Scuolas weren't schools, but more like guilds or civic organizations. Scuolas with money commissioned great artists to paint their walls, and now this one has become a museum. It's not big, but every inch is covered with interesting scenes to look at.

    The dramatic paintings upstairs are the big draw, but my favorites are two moody landscapes by Tintoretto, one with Mary Magdalen and one with Saint Mary of Egypt. They're at the back of the ground floor. The color, light, and water in both render them very poetic. You can buy postcards of your favorites in the little shop on the ground floor.

    Scuola Grande di San Rocco
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    Scuola Grande Di San Rocco

    by diageva Updated Jan 27, 2005

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    This was a great surprise ... my first day ... after visiting Frari I did walk around and find this building ... I went near to see what was about ... the downs stairs was not very impressive for me ... but the top floors are just incredible ... this is a really must see
    The decoration inside is magnificent. The fresh paints of the walls and ceilings ... the paints at frames ... Tintoreto, Bellini .... great

    I didn't notice and did get inside without paying ... but after I saw that the price was 5,5 euros. :)))) sorry ....

    Open from 9 to 17:30

    Scuola Grande di San Rocco
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    Scuola Grande di San Rocco

    by Mahieu Updated Jan 27, 2005

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    This was one of the highlights of my Venice visit! Built in the first half of the 16th century, the Guildhall of San Rocco is the home of an extraordinary collection of paintings from Tintoretto. On the ground floor you can see his paintings of the New Testament. The upper floor and the ceiling are dedicated to scenes from the Old Testament.
    Even if you're not into paintings that much, you should still see this, the wealth of this building is truly amazing!
    There are free mirrors available to walk through the halls to admire the beautiful painted ceiling!

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    Scuola Grande S. Rocco

    by mapakettle Updated Dec 15, 2004

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    I am not one for art work, and don't pretend to know very much, so when I say I was impressed, accept it as gospel.

    Impressed is hardly important enough of a word. We have seen so much art throughout Italy, that it has become a blur, and sadly, I have become immune to the sights.

    This place was wonderful. Forget the main floor, just a bunch of cracked pottery, however the walls of the assembly hall are adorned with a series on the life of the Virgin Mary.

    The second floor is amazing, beginning with the sweeping stairway designed by Antonio Scarpagnino, with floor to ceiling artwork...huge in scope.

    The sala Grande Superiore has over 50 paintings all done by Tintoretto, a brash artist scorned by masters in his earlier days, and considered to be too 'quick' to pick up his brush and begin creating. His speed and ability to format his paintings in his minds eye was incomprehendible to other artists of his day. It is mind boggling to think one man created these master pieces.

    Mind you, it took him twenty three years to do it. Probably a government job. What, two paintings a year...whooppee!! The other guys must have been real slugs.

    Seriously though, his paintings are incredible. He uses a wonderful technique of creating light above specific areas within the work that he wants attention drawn towards. His detail, fantastic, especially on his largest work Crucifixion. My eyes were immediately drawn to a whip which appeared to me to be in 3D.

    The walls, as well as the ceilings are filled with artwork, and many pieces sit on easels cordorned off by rope. What really caught my eye however were the fantastic wood carvings adorning the walls circling the great rooms.

    Price for admission was 5.50 euro, which included a portable audioguide which described each piece in great detail.

    Worth a visit, trust me...

    sometimes refered to Tintoretto's Sistine Chapel
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    Scuola Grande S. Rocco

    by AgentJX Written Sep 28, 2002

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    One of the more unique places to visit in Venice if you are interested in classical art, the Scuola Grande S. Rocco contains 56 works by Tintoretto over a two-story building. These works are truly amazing and cover the walls, ceiling and staircase of the building. Those in charge of the Scuola have thoughtfully have included stacks of small mirrors so it is possible to look at the ceiling art without hurting your neck. Although this place might not be the most well know stop in Venice it is well worth the price of admission.

    entry ticket

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    Scuola Grande di San Rocco

    by Chamsa Written Sep 8, 2002

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    This School was built in the 1515 became famous for it's Tintoretto's paintings that remained here for more than twenty years and that represented the masterpieces of Venetian painting between the Renaissance and Mannerism. Besides, here are kept works by Giorgione, Tiziano e Tiepolo.

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