Vaporetto, Venice

118 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Vaporetto
    by croisbeauty
  • Vaporetto
    Vaporetto
    by croisbeauty
  • Vaporetto
    Vaporetto
    by croisbeauty
  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Vaporetto

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jun 2, 2014

    Venice efficient vaporetto boat shuttle system is easy to use and understand. If you intend to travel a lot during your stay, a tourist ticket can be bought for various periods of time. As the single tickets are rather expensive, the dayticket option - with unlimited vaporetto rides during the chosen timeframe - is usually the best for a visitor. Vaporetto flyers with an overview of the connections and lines that serve them are available at most hotels and any tourist information.

    Vaporetto Line 1 travels along the Canale Grande rather slowly and is the best if you want to travel at a relaxed pace. I recommend taking this line first thing in the morning as later in the day the vaporettos tend to fill up very quickly; the best seats (in the open area at the back of the boat) with the best photo opportunities will be gone quickly.

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Linea 2 on the Giudecca Canal.

    by breughel Updated Apr 14, 2014

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sitting at the bow of vaporetto 2.
    3 more images

    If you want to do something special with the vaporetto Linea 2 (replaced Linea 82 in 2011), embark at the third pontoon at San Zaccaria (facing the hotel Danieli *) direction Giudecca. Check well that you are on the right pontoon because in summer Linea 2 also continues to the Lido de Venezia.

    The first stop is the island and church of San Giorgio Maggiore. Here you have the best views on Venice, visit the campanile; you'll never forget (photo 2). Then follow the various stops on the Giudecca canal; the boat is crisscrossing the canal. There are not much passengers on this part so that you might have a seat at the bow (photo 1).

    You will see on the right the harbour with the huge cruise ships (photo 3), then reach Piazzale Roma, the station and finally be back on the Canal Grande. It is a long trip, 50 minutes from San Zaccaria till the Rialto, but it will be one of your best souvenirs of Venice.

    * Even if I was rich enough I would not stay at the Danieli Hotel. This hotel has no terrace on the water but on the roof, it faces the very noisy pontoons of San Zaccaria (Linea 1 & 2 as well as larger boats like the one of linea 15 coming from Punta Sabbionni - photo 4). Furthermore the Riva degli Schiavoni is as crowded with tourists as Piazza San Marco. There are better, let say more romantic places in Venice.

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Good use of the vaporetto.

    by breughel Updated Apr 13, 2014

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The first thing you will observe taking a vaporetto is that they are very crowded. Worst hours are in the morning going from Piazzale Roma to San Marco and even worse the returns from San Marco around 16 - 18 h. It can therefore be useful if you are at San Marco and have to go back to Piazzale Roma to take first a vaporetto in the opposite direction for one or two stops till Arsenal, for example, where the Linea 1 vaporetto is not crowded. You will have observed that at some stops there are one or two pontoons (sometimes more like at the Rialto or San Zaccaria). Look out that you are on the pontoon in the wanted direction. Indications are very clear.

    The second thing you will observe is that on the main lines 1 and 2 (Grand Canal) there are two types of boats:
    The "good" vaporetto's for sight seeing are those who have a dozen seats at the bow in front and on the side of the pilot cabin (photos 1, 2 & 3). If you get a seat there it is a wonderful experience. It is the best spot to film or take photos of the Grand Canal; you have to remain seated.
    Behind the pilot cabin is a central space supposed for disembarking and embarking. In this central standing platform there are no handrails, you are supposed to keep your balance like the Venetians do. Behind is a large closed cabin where passengers should go and sit (if there is room to sit). At the stern of the boat are also some seats, in the open, also a good place for sight seeing.
    The "bad" vaporetto's have no seats at the bow (photo 4).

    The third type are smaller ones which you find on lines 41 & 42 to Murano. They are low on the water and not comfortable for sight seeing.

    The third thing you will observe is that it takes time: 40 minutes from Piazzale Roma till San Marco Vallaresso by Linea 1 (30 min. by Linea 2 via Rialto). Frequency is 10 min. (most of the day) and they are well on time!

    Was this review helpful?

  • halikowski's Profile Photo

    Water map

    by halikowski Updated Jan 16, 2014
    route map

    Still getting a bit confused after a month. Not all the vaporettos have easily identifiable signs, and the numbering itself e.g. 5.2.1 is a bit chaotic.
    Remember to avoid the stopping number 1 if you want to move quickly.. it takes an hour to go down the Grand Canal and over to the Lido. The 4 (or is it the 6?) is much quicker, and avoids the Grand Canal altogether.
    70 euros (30 for the abonnamento) for a month was OK, even though I didn't see any controllers ever!

    Was this review helpful?

  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    Using the Vaporetto

    by basstbn Written Mar 27, 2013
    A Vaporetto on the Grand Canal
    3 more images

    When you need to get around Venice, you take a vaporetto; when it's time for (expensive) leisurely sight-seeing to remember for a lifetime, you hire a gondola. That's not to say you can't get some great views or shoot photos from the vaporetti, it just depends on whether or not you get an outside seat. I was fortunate.

    Think of the vaporetto as a city bus that floats, one that you board at one of the well-marked docks along the Grand Canal. If you arrive in Venice by train (as we did) and plan to spend one day touring the city (as we did), it works well to take the vaporetto from the train station (Ferrovia stop) to S Marco stop near St. Mark's Square, then gradually work your way back in the direction of the train station in the course of the day.

    There are two major lines used by most travelers, #1 and #2 - not too tricky. Line #1 is the "milk run," stopping at each station along the way; Line #2 is an express boat that makes fewer stops.

    A few things to be aware of: If boarding at the train station and wishing to go to Piazza San Marco, check with the conductor if this boat goes there, as some go only as far as Rialto. Smaller stops have only one dock, so be careful you are catching a vaporetto heading in the right direction. Larger stops have separate docks, so make certain you queue up at the proper one. The electronic sign boards are most helpful and not difficult to figure out - even with a minimal understanding of the Italian language.

    There are other options - traghettos (a shuttle service used by many locals) and water taxis (very expensive in my opinion), but using the vaporetto service is handiest for most visitors.

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Vaporetto

    by solopes Updated Jan 25, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Venice - Italy

    The best way to move around Venice is... by foot, but distances are not so short, and when we get tired a transport becomes a blessing.

    Bus in Venice is vaporetto, a ship that stops in both sides of the grand canal and with carriers to the other islands. Though stopping quite often, the efficient work in docking saves time, allowing a trip quicker than expected. There are several tickets, so it's better to plan the visit before buying.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Venice's bus system

    by GentleSpirit Written Oct 26, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    In Venice there are no streets, the canals are too deep to allow for underground tunnels, the ground is too soft to allow overhead rail. So, unless you wish to walk, you are pretty much limited to taking a variety of boats.

    Of course, there are the traditional gondolas. A Mite expensive.

    Water Taxi- speedboats. the driver isn't dressed in the traditional blue and white striped shirt and gondoliers hat, but he will get you anywhere you want to go fast! It will certainly cost you.

    Vaporetto- this is the city's public transport system. Like all bus systems anywhere, there are a variety of lines. In Venice there are 19 lines that will take you everywhere around the city and the nearby islands.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Alilaguna boat from the Airport to Venice

    by zadunajska8 Written Feb 7, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Alilaguna pier at Venice Airport - with ice!
    4 more images

    Alilaguna is a private company seperate to ACTV who run most of Venices Vaporettos. They operate services between Marco Polo airport and Venice as well as a number of the other islands in the Venetian lagoon. As they are a seperate company the ACTV tickets are NOT valid on Alilaguna boats. You have to buy a seperate ticket for Alilaguna. Tickets can be purchased at the desk in the arrivals hall at Marco Polo airport and you can get one way or return tickets. A return cost €25 in February 2012 if buying at the airport. You can buy tickets onboard the boat (but I believe this costs a little more) or in advance online (for a little less) but the online purchase still has to be exchanged for an actual ticket at the Alilaguna desk in the airport.

    Approaching Venice over water is a perfect way to start your holiday in this city and so I would recommend this way of getting there despite it being more expensive than taking the bus to P.le Roma. The boats have at least a couple of different routes (and I believe more in peak summer season) and these all have numerous stops. We took the blue line which took us to San Zaccaria (1 stop before San Marco) in about 1 hour 15 minutes and we were less than a one minute walk to the door of our hotel in Calle de Rasse.

    If you sit on the right hand side of the boat you'll get some superb views as you approach the city.

    An interesting quirk which we saw on our return trip to the airport resulted from the extremely cold weather Venice had been experiencing - ice on the lagoon! Yes, the Venetian lagoon had actually started to ice over. Whilst this caused little problem for the boat (it seemed anyway - we arrived only 10 minutes later than sheduled) it made for a sight I had not expected to see.

    Was this review helpful?

  • BLewJay's Profile Photo

    Go just about anywhere

    by BLewJay Written Jan 25, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vaparetto on the Grand Canal
    3 more images

    The easiest and quickest way to get around Venezia is by the vaparetto (waterbus). It has a set of 19 scheduled lines that serves locales within Venice and also travels between Venice and nearby islands (e.g., Murano, Burano, Lido, Torcello, etc.).

    Was this review helpful?

  • painterdave's Profile Photo

    Getting Across the Big Canals by gondola

    by painterdave Written Oct 3, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    straight across, that's it!

    There is a special way to ride a gondola on the cheap. It is called a traghetto, and the embarkation places are listed on Venice maps by a line across the canal, usually in red, or dotted. I have included an example here to show you how to find the cheap ride. 50 cents (euros) a ride and the wait iine will not be long. If there are a lot of people, you get to stand up and go across.
    You can return home and tell your friends that you rode a gondola 4, 5 tiimes... :-)
    Happy Boating
    for more info check this out:
    http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/20aea8/

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Women's Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • starship's Profile Photo

    Vaporetti ~ Convenient but Crowded & Expensive

    by starship Updated Jul 17, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vaporettos and Yellow Vaparetto Station or Stop

    One of the many types of transportation which tourists often use to transit up and down the Grand Canal is the "Vaporetto". These boats are designed to carry large numbers of people and function much as buses would on land and they are usally full to the brim. The Vaporetti have designated, named station/stop along the canal, such as Ferrovia, Rialto, S. Marco, etc.

    We did not have a great experience on our one vaparetto trip from San Marco to Ferrovia, the closest stop to our hotel. After standing in a long line just to buy tickets, we were caught in a virtual stampede to board the boat. Standing cheek-to-cheek, people had to hold on to anything higher or lower than themselves to remain upright. If you were unlucky enough to be near the sliding boarding gate such as we were, which alternated from side to side, not only did you get pushed by those leaving the boat, but the boat attendant constantly admonished you to move aside, but there was no place to go. He really became very angry with one man who simply ignored him and I thought there would be a fight, but thankfully it didn't go that far. To add to the discomfort, the ride was unmercifully long (45 minutes!?)because the vaporetto stopped at each and every station/stop!

    Vaporetto tickets are good for 60 minutes and cost 6,50 Euros (2011 price). You can also purchase a 72-hour ticket for around 30 Euros or so. You might consider buying a monthly pass (abbonamento) for roughly 30 Euros if you are staying more than just a couple days. However, you will also need a passport-sized photo, a photocopy of your passport, and you must purchase an ID card (tessera) for 8 Euros. Tourists under the age of 30 may purchase a "Rolling Venice" card which gets you a 3-day travelcard for around 20 or so Euros which seems to be the best deal for the young!

    Purchase these tickets at the ACTV ticket office located across from the Piazzale Roma (at the other end of the building from the People Mover).

    Considering nearly every vaporetto I saw during our stay was packed to the gills and the cost is high if you are unable to get discounted tickets, I preferred walking as much as possible.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Carino's Profile Photo

    Water Buses

    by Carino Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Easy way to go around in the city, but pricely if you buy the wrong tickets.

    Prices:
    1 hour: EUR 6.50
    12-HOUR TRAVELCARD: EUR 14
    24-HOUR TRAVELCARD: EUR 16
    36-HOUR TRAVELCARD: EUR 21
    48-HOUR TRAVELCARD: EUR 26
    72-HOUR TRAVELCARD: EUR 31
    3-DAY YOUTH CARD (14-29 yrs): EUR 18

    Also check on CARTAVENEZIA CARD that might save you some bucks.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Water Bus - Vaporetto

    by grayfo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vaporetto (water bus) is for me the best way of getting from the airport to Venice and back; you won’t find too many public transport routes as unforgettable as the vaporetto.

    You can buy the ACTV (Azienda del Corsorzio Transporti Veneziani) tickets at the ticket booths at the docks or the VE.LA. ticket offices. You can also buy tickets from one of the many authorised sellers (tobacconists, newspaper stores and some cafés): remember to stamp your ticket in the yellow machine before getting on the vaporetto. Tickets are not sold on board the boats. If you find yourself on board without a ticket, inform the ACTV crew immediately so as to avoid paying a fine.

    At the boat stops there are maps giving the directions that boats stopping there are going, the vaporetto is a good and leisurely way to admire the views.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • slcook52's Profile Photo

    The Vaporettos

    by slcook52 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    vaporetto stop
    4 more images

    Well of course next to walking, the best way to see Venice is by vaporetto. You can easily get from one end of the Grand Canal to the other, ride a boat around the lagoon on the "circulare route" or go to one of the other islands. There are many stops along the Grand Canal, with 2 lines to choose from. #1 is the slow boat, making all the stops and taking about 45 minutes for the entire trip. #82 is the fast boat taking only about 25 minutes with fewer stops. Then there's the #3 & #4 express making only 4 stops from the train station to San Marco. You can buy one ticket (6euro) that is good for 60 minutes, or one of the different passes (12 hr, 24hr, 36hr, 48hr or 72hr). Be sure to validate the ticket before boarding in the machine on the dock.
    Another alternative to looking for a bridge to cross the Grand Canal (there are only 3) is to use the traghetti to cross. These are gondolas that shuttle people across the canal at 8 different locations. Cost is 50cents.
    Then there are the expensive water taxis and the gondolas.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • billyb8's Profile Photo

    Vaporetta in Venice

    by billyb8 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Traffic Venetian style
    2 more images

    People who have yet to visit Venice make the assumtion that you have to use boats all the time. Most people living here don't. On the main Islands it is often as quick to walk as to chugg along at 5 knots. So the routes along the Grand Canal are largely for visitors, after about 08:00 until the evening commuter rush.
    Otherwise there are two main reasons for using Vaporetti.
    Firstly there are places you cannot walk to, if you wish to go to any of the islands away from the main grouping.
    Secondly they can be a lazy way to kick back and get your bearings.
    They can be expensive, when people see €6 per trip nerves are shocked. There are tourist tickets but if you are staying more the 3 days the cheapest is to buy the CarteVenezia. The ACTV office at the bus station sells these for €40 boats and buses, or €26 boats only. These last for three years, the first month travel free, after that €1 per trip. You will need a photo.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Venice

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

108 travelers online now

Comments

View all Venice hotels