The overviews, Verona

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  • The overviews
    by croisbeauty
  • The overviews
    by croisbeauty
  • The overviews
    by croisbeauty
  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Panoramic view of the city

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 17, 2006

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    Favorite thing: The west bank of the river Adige and the old core of the town. This is the real heart of the historical centre of Verona with al major spots and the most significant monuments of the town.
    There are five bridges across the river of Adige from this side and each one leads you directly in the centre of the town.

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    Roman Gateways I

    by sandysmith Updated May 20, 2006

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    Porta Borsari
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    Favorite thing: Verona is a wonderful old city to explore and many roman remains can be seen. The Borsari gate was one of the main entrances to the old Roman city - it was originally called Jupiter's gate. Shame about the traffic today but try to get a look at it. It is beautifully lit up at night too - and more peaceful way of enjoying it!

    Fondest memory: Roman gates were actually a building witha central courtyard. The stone facing of a facade is all that remains today - but its such an unusual sight as you head into the old town - it leads into Piazza delle Erbe (opposite end to Via Mazzini)

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    Verona, view from the air

    by sachara Updated Feb 10, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Flying back home from Verona airport south of the city, we were lucky to have a perfect view at citycentre of Verona. It was great to see the river meandering between the buildings. I could even recognize the old citycentre with the bridges, the churches and even a glimpse of the arena.

    It was a wonderful way to say goodbye to Verona, knowing you will come back some day.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Panoramic view of the city

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 30, 2005

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    Verona, bend of the river Adige
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    Favorite thing: The band of the river Adige with the Duomo on the left-hand and the church of San Giorgio in Braida on the right-hand.

    Fondest memory: On the right corner of the picture, you can see the bell tower of the church Santo Stefano, a masterpiece of Veronese Romanesque architecture. It was intended to be the city's first Cathedral.
    By taking the road, next to Santo Stefano, you can reach two very important spots, San Pietro Hill with the castle and the Sanctuary of Madonna di Lourdes.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Panoramic view of the city

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 30, 2005

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    Verona
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    Favorite thing: Closer look to the old core of the town, with the church of Santa Anastasia in front and the Torre Lamberti in the back.
    Torre Lamberti, situated on Piazza delle Erbe, is the highest tower of the city which offers magnificient view at the old historical centre.

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    Ponte Nuovo

    by Azhut Updated May 15, 2005

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    Ponte Nuovo

    Favorite thing: Just a bit out of the centre of Verona but not too distant stands Ponte Nuovo. From there you can look at Castelvecchio built by Cangrande II on the top of the hills that surrounded the town. The castle was a fortress and a guarantee of escape. The construction of the castle began around 1354 and Cangrande II lived there only for 5 years; in 1359 he was killed by several assassins, aid by his brother Cansignorio, who took the dominion of Verona

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    The Adige river

    by Azhut Updated May 15, 2005

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    The Adige

    Favorite thing: I found Verona a very fashinating town not only for its wonderful monuments and historical works but also because of its river the Adige. When you have time to explore better the town I suggest a walking along the river where you can enjoy a beautiful view of Teatro romano and San Pietro, one of the surroundings area of Verona.

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    Verona City walls

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 26, 2005

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    city walls Piazza Bra

    Favorite thing: Verona's historic centre is surrounded by walls (10km in length) erected on the orders of Scaligeri family. The walls are a relatively unknown feature of the city and in some parts are still incredibly well conserved. Little remains of the double walls built by the Romans (only a little segment along the actual via Diaz and a piece of wall of the Mura di Gallieno near the Arena), the communal walls between Castelvecchio and Ponte Aleardi, which were rebuilt after the inundation in 1239, are still in a perfect state of conservation.

    Fondest memory: This arched entrance into Piazza Bra is called: Portoni della Bra and at the side is a pentagonal tower.

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    City pavement Map

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 26, 2005

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    pavement map by Piazza delle Erbe

    Fondest memory: Well this literally was a landmark! At either end of Via Mazzini which link Piazza Bra and Piazza delle Erbe, Verona's two main squares, are bronze maps set in the pavement. I didn't really notice them until towards the end of our stay but I thought they were well done! The arena is clearly seen and the river Adige snakes around the old town centre.

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    Arena di Verona

    by Jeca011 Updated Mar 16, 2005

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    Arena

    Favorite thing: The Roman amphitheatre or only The Arena was built in the first half of the 1st century A.D. It is the third largest building of its type and is the most well preserved. It has been used to host games and battles, plays in the 12th century, in Medieval times for games and tournaments and in 1913 it became the largest operatic theatre in the world.

    The amphitheatre is built from three concentric circles. Only one side of the external ring remains. It is commonly referred to as the “Wing” (or Ala in Italian).

    Through time, it has become the very symbol of the city.

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    Castelvecchio

    by Jeca011 Updated Mar 16, 2005

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    Castelvecchio

    Favorite thing: Castelvecchio (or Old castle) is another simbol of Verona. It was built in 1354-1355 as a home of Scala Family. Restorations have recovered parts of its original design because the Castle has suffered many modifications - the Venetian, the Frenchs and the Austrians changed parts of the castle. Even Napoleon constructed a courtyard inside its walls. Nowadays there’s a modern Gallery in the Castle the "Museo Civico d’Arte". Here you can see original equestrian sculpture of Cangrande from the Arche Scaligeri.

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    Panoramic view of the city

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 24, 2004

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    Verona
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    Favorite thing: This picture shows the magnificient bridge of Ponte Pietra, the only one that remains from the Roman times of the town. Ponte Pietra dates from the Pre-Augustan period, and has five beautiful arches. At the end of the bridge stands the tall watch tower by Alberto della Scala.
    Right in behind you can see Il Duomo, the Cathedral of Verona and its imposing campanile.

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    Panoramic view of the city

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 24, 2004

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    Favorite thing: The eastern part of the city which rises on the left bank of the Adige river.
    In this part of the city the most significant spots are: The Roman Theatre and Archaeological Museum, Palazzo e Giardino Giusti, The church of San Giovanni in Valle, The church of Santa Maria in Organo, the church of Santi Nazaro e Celso and Palazzo Pompei (Museo Civico di Scienze Naturali).

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    San Pietro Hill

    by montezaro Updated May 26, 2004

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    San Pietro Hill

    Favorite thing: San Pietro Hill is situated on the left bank of the river Adige, right above the Archaeological Museum and Roman Theatre. The top of the hill dominates the Castle of San Pietro, which was forticitacion built by the times of Austrian rule of the town of Verona.
    It definetely worth to visit because you will be aworded by the magnificent view of the historic centre of Verona and its close surroundings.

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    Bits and pieces

    by iandsmith Written May 2, 2004

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    Pieces just lying about

    Favorite thing: I took this shot specifically to give you an idea of just what the displays are like.
    There are literally scores of pieces just lying around, some with explanations while others may be explained by the information sheets available at various points.
    There are capitals, pilasters, arches, bits of mosaic and bases simply resting on the ground or in the cloisters of the monastery of the Gesuati (built around 1480).

    Fondest memory: An interesting insight into the engineering genius of the Romans can be gleaned by visiting the big room (that's what it's called by the way).
    There you can see an opening in the pavement and a side door allows you to see a hollow space - a cut about 18 metres deep and over 100 metres long. This was done in the tuff to prevent water infiltrations from reaching the theatre. To stop mudslides the walls were fixed with heavy wooden beams.

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