The churches & the cloisters, Verona

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  • Chiesa di San Stefano
    Chiesa di San Stefano
    by croisbeauty
  • The churches & the cloisters
    by croisbeauty
  • The churches & the cloisters
    by croisbeauty
  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Tempio Votivo

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 22, 2014

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    1. Piazzale XXV Aprile in front of the station
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    The large square in front of the railway station (more of a parking lot actually) is called the Piazzale XXV Aprile, named after the 25th of April 1945 , which is celebrated as the day of liberation from the fascists at the end of the Second World War.

    The church at the opposite side is called the Tempio Votivo. It was built as a result of a vow made at the height of the Second World War, on September 8, 1943, by the Cardinal in the name of the city and the diocese. The church was built after the war and was opened in 1952, but not officially consecrated until 1958.

    Second photo: A closer view.

    Third photo: Inside the Tempio Votivo.

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    Duomo: do look closely

    by leics Written Apr 15, 2012

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    Shorts are not a modern invention!
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    As with all early Medieval churches, in Italy and elsewhere in Europe, looking closely at the detail really is worthwhile.

    Medieval masons and stonecarvers were incredibly skilful. You will find wonderful representations of animals, insects, humans, mythical creatures...almost anything which took the workman's fancy really.

    We didn't go into the Duomo, unfortunately, but I did get chance for a close look at the two Romanesque doorways. The photos show some of what I found.

    There is much more to find, so take a minute or two to get up close and have a look.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Santa Anastasia - Holy water stoup

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 1, 2011

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    hunchback
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    This Holy water stoup, from 1495, was carved by Gabriele, father of Paolo Caliari better known as "il Veronese". It features a hunchback, a figure which from time immemorial has always appealed to the superstitious. It is said that touching a hunchback on the hump brings good luck.

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    The romanesque church of San Giovanni in Valle

    by effeti Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    The main apse of the church
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    The whole Verona province is scattered with romanesque churches...because of a big earthquake that destroyed nearly everything, and many churches too... And they were logically rebuilt with the fashion of the time...the romanesque-

    This wonderful little church is not far at all from the city center (it is in fact just "over" the Roman Theater), but an "off thee beaten path" anyway, hidden in a narrow street going up from the ponte pietra area to the hill of Castel San Pietro

    There are the remains of a cloister at its right.

    The little crypt has two wonderful jewels of late roman sculpture. Two very well-preserved sarcophagi ( see pictures # and #3) carved in white marble (not local marble for sure). One recalling Christian scenes (IVth century), and one pagan (IIIrd century).

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    St. Salvaro in San Pietro di Legnago

    by effeti Updated Dec 29, 2009

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    St Salvaro
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    Another gem of the romanesque art... a little church built in 1117...
    If you are going from Verona south to Rovigo/Ferrara on SS434, you pass at not more than 1km from this little church.. If you love this kind of architecture, it may be worth a little diversion.
    It's situated in Legnago, village of San Pietro, just south of the center of this little town
    See the link on the "website" window for more..
    it's about 40km far from Verona citycenter.

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    St. Mary the Greater in Gazzo Veronese (40 km out)

    by effeti Updated Dec 29, 2009

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    The church after a rare snowfall
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    A romanesque church in the country. A must see if you have a car and love the churches built about 900 years ago.

    Gazzo Veronese was situated during the Roman age along the "Claudia Augusta" road from Ostiglia to Verona (about 40 km south of the citycenter, not far nowadays from Nogara and the Mantua province) close to the Tartaro river and derives its name from a longobard term that means " forest ".

    The current church, dedicated to St. Mary, rises over a mosaic pavement that perhaps belonged to a previous church, maybe the first church risen in this place,and partially visible from inside the actual church.

    The restorations, executed between 1938 and the 1940, put in light this mosaic pertaining to the high Middle Age and that is one of the more interesting examples of the high middle-age art.

    According to the hypothesis made by Da Lisca and by Arslan the building would have been founded in the middle of the XII cent. or so; it is made by three naves divided by from columns with cubical shaped capital made by cooked masonry; the facade is salients-shaped and puts in relief by outside the division in three naves of the church.

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    Chiesa di San Stefano

    by croisbeauty Updated Feb 10, 2008

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    Chiesa di San Stefano
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    The Church of S. Stefano, on the left bank of the river Adige, was known at the time of Theodoric. It was the Cathedral of Verona from 429 to 750. It seems that more than twenty Bishops of Verona, from S. Petronio to S. Biagio, where buried here.
    The church has very interesting exteriors, actually it looks as remains of two or more churches were put together making uniquecomplex. The front facade, in white and pink coloured marble, is typicall medieval style in building churces. The interiors is even more interesting with remains of first built church on this site.

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    San Giorgio in Braida

    by viddra Written Jun 16, 2007

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    San Giorgio in Braida

    The church was founded in 1447 and designed by Antonio Ricci. It was built on the site of a small 8th-century church, dedicated to the same saint. In the 16th century, the drum and the cupola were designed by Sanmicheli.

    It’s one of the richest in works of art in Verona. Here you can find the works of Tintoretto, Ottino, Caroto and others.

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  • effeti's Profile Photo

    SS. Trinità in monte Oliveto - I

    by effeti Updated Jul 26, 2006

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    Ss. Trinity bell tower
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    This church is less than a kilometer from the arena, and just around the corner from the Arena carpark, and yet it is a off the beaten path....

    It deserves, in my opinion, more attention.

    Here you can see the bell tower, in the typical veronese shape, built with row of bricks and stone, that gives that orizontal stripes effect so typical in Verona's ancient buildings.
    The church was bult in pure romanic style and completed by 1140.

    Nowadays only a few parts have the original purity: The apse's zone and the atrium.
    The rest of the church was modified during the history, and a little part had to be rebuilt (as near to the original as possible) after the church was hit by an allied bomb during WWII

    Click Click here to see a detailed Google map with the church at the center

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    S. Giovanni in Foro

    by sandysmith Written May 20, 2006
    interior
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    This was a church that Francesco pointged out to us after our meal at Da Unga - one he had never been passed when it was open - so imagine our surprise the next day when we found it open and of course we had to have a quick look at this old chuch of the forum and took a ffew pics.

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    San Zeno

    by sandysmith Updated May 20, 2006

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    San Zeno
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    San Zeno is one of Verona's most important chuches, but as its not in the old town area I reckon many miss out on this beautiful chuch with its rose window. The engraved rose window, was named the wheel of fortune, by Briolotto. The Porch was designed by Maestro Nicolo (1138) and at he base of the church are two lions - just as at the Duomo. San Zeno has a lovely 15th century zebra striped bell tower too, marking the spot where King Pepin the Short is buried.

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    SS. Trinità in monte Oliveto - II

    by effeti Updated Apr 13, 2006

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    SS. Trinit?: the porch
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    The church was built between 1073 and 1117.
    You can see in the picture the rare "porch" of the church.
    The church was damaged by WW II bombings, but was well restored and has still many original frescoes inside.
    You can see in the interior many styles in sort of layers, but the original structures are well readable.
    All in all, the effect is very good... You will have most likely the chance of enjoying the church away from the crwds, because it's not a turist spot... but it desrves a visit.

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    San Zeno in Oratorio

    by montezaro Updated May 18, 2005

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    San Zeno in Oratorio

    The small church of San Zeno in Oratorio is almost hidden in a short street very close to Castelvecchio. The front side of the church, called San Zenetto, stands right opposite to the castle.
    It is one of the two oldest churches dedicated to the Saint patron of the city. The church was built in the 4th century on a site of an Roman cemetery, but its present look dates back from the 14th century.

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    Bronze Doors

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 26, 2005

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    San Zeno doors

    The bronze doors of San Zeno have been covered up from the exterior but can be seen from the inside. One doorr has scenes from the old testament and the other door has scenes from the new testament - they are so good that they are often referred to as the "poor man's bible".

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    San Zeno Maggiore

    by montezaro Updated Feb 13, 2005

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    San Zeno Maggiore

    The basilica of San Zeno Maggiore, besides Arena, is the most important monument of Verona. It is considered one of the great achievements of Romanesque architecture. The present building is the thisd basilica built on the same site. It is a must see when visiting Verona, however, situated away from the city centre and many tourists miss it.

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