Duomo, Verona

19 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • From an exhibition of paintings inside
    From an exhibition of paintings inside
    by IreneMcKay
  • Duomo Nativity Scene.
    Duomo Nativity Scene.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Verona Cathedral
    Verona Cathedral
    by IreneMcKay
  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Duomo Nativity Scene

    by IreneMcKay Written Jan 17, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I know I'll be thought of as a complete philistine but even surrounded by all those wonderful works of art my favourite feature of the duomo was its nativity scene - especially the sheep.

    I loved it because it was so simple and childlike and well just so pretty. This was the best nativity scene I saw all holiday though the Church of Sant Andrea in Iseo came close.

    How could you not love those sheep? Duomo Nativity Scene. Mosaic Floors From an exhibition of paintings inside
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Religious Travel
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Verona Cathedral

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 17, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was easily far and away the highlight of our visit. For a start it had heating and we actually managed to regain feeling in our fingers and toes after being in here, plus it had a free, clean toilet and having spent hours in the freezing cold I was very happy to see one of them.

    I do know these features are probably irrelevant to most people. Verona cathedral is absolutely beautiful. Entry costs 2 Euros 50 cents and was well worth it.

    Verona's duomo is the Cattedrale Santa Maria Matricolare. A cathedral was first built on this site in the eighth and ninth centuries, but this was destroyed by an earthquake in 1117. The present cathedral was built between 1117 and 1138, however its interior was completely redone in Gothic style in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The cathedral is filled with many beautiful works of art.

    Off to the left of the cathedral apse a connecting door leads to the Baptistery of San Giovanni which has an octagonal font. Near the baptistery stands the small chapel of Saint Helen, which has the remains of some Roman floor mosaics.

    Verona Cathedral Verona Cathedral Verona Cathedral Verona Cathedral Verona Cathedral
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Duomo Santa Maria Assunta

    by Roeffie Updated Aug 16, 2014

    This Cathedral was built on the foundations of an earlier church and was consecrated in 1187. It is dedicated to Santa Maria Assunta. It's made in the roman style.

    Currently (july 2014) they are restoring the cathedral, so it was difficult to make a nice picture of it I have to see if I still have one.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Twan's Profile Photo

    Duomo di Verona

    by Twan Written Oct 17, 2013

    The successive early Christian, high medieval, Romanesque and Gothic contributions through the course of time have made the Duomo an extremely rich architectural complex, more than just a single building: it is formed by the Cathedral, the square, the Capitulary Library, the cloister of the Canonicals, St. Elena, St. Giovanni in Fonte and the Bishopric. The history of the Verona Cathedral is the history of four Basilicas. Among the architectural innovations of the latest grandiose intervention, between the second half of the XV century and the second half of the XVI century, are the façade, the internal door, over which there is a splendid clock, the great columns, erected to raise the naves; the choir banister by Sammicheli.

    Duomo di Verona Duomo di Verona Duomo di Verona Duomo di Verona Duomo di Verona
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral (Duomo)

    by mikelisaanna Written Feb 18, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Verona's cathedral was built in the 1100s and is worth a visit. The cathedral's exterior is fairly plain, but its interior is beautiful - full of marble, paintings and sculptures. The paintings are from a number of local renaissance aritsts, of who Titian is the most well known. Another highlight of the the interior is its beautiful pipe organ. Off to one side of the nave, there is the foundation of an old church that has been excavated.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • The Cathedral

    by reenby Updated Jul 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cathedral is not actually in the centre and requires a bit of a hike to get to it, but it does take you off the tourst trail.. If you head towards the river to the north east side, you can plan the walk to take you through some of the oldest streets in Verona such as Via Sottoriva .

    The cathedral complex actaully has much more than just the cathedral itself. There are the cloisters, Santa Elena a very old but pretty church where Dante read out some of his work, and the Bibioteca.

    All very intersting and educatinal, however I must admit that my favourite were the basilisks guarding the main door. Make sure you get a picture astride one of them

    Was this review helpful?

  • alucas's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral complex in Verona - Part 3

    by alucas Written Dec 9, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Church of St Elena

    The Church of St Elena was built in the 9th century, and extensively renovated after the earthquake of 1117. It is very simple compared with the Cathedral and the Baptistery, but has a charm of its own. The carved marble slab dates from 1440, but my Latin was far too rusty to translate the rest of the inscription. Don?t miss the quaint organ, with its hand-bellows.

    Marble monument in the Church of St Elena Organ with hand-bellows in the Church of St Elena
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • alucas's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral complex in Verona - Part 2

    by alucas Written Dec 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Baptistery

    The entrance to the Baptistery is through a door beneath the organ in the Cathedral.

    The Baptistery dates from the 12th century, and has recently been restored. Frescos can be seen adorning the walls, and there are several interesting paintings. The octagonal font is enormous and is carved from a single block of marble. The details are worth a close study.

    The font in the Baptistery The font in the Baptistery - detail
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • alucas's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral complex in Verona - Part 1

    by alucas Updated Dec 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cathedral

    The Cathedral complex in Verona consists of the Cathedral itself and the church of St Giovanni in Fonte (the Baptistery of the Cathedral) and the church of St Elena.

    Entrance fee 2.50 euros, but you can buy a day ticket giving admission to the five churches, or use the Verona card.

    The cathedral complex has grown on this site since the 4th century AD, and the present church dates from the 8th and 9th centuries. It has been altered and renovated over the centuries, with major reconstruction in the 12th century following an earthquake. There are paintings and frescos dating from the 15th and 16th century refurbishments. The latest renovations only finished in 2002.

    Through a door on the left-hand side beneath the organ you can visit the Baptistery and the Church of St Elena.

    Verona - The Duomo The West front of the Duomo Details of the West Door
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Duomo

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 16, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Verona's cathedral (Santa Maria Matricolare) was begun in 1139 and is fronted by a magnificent Romanesque portal carved by Nicolo, one of the two master masons responsible for the facade of San Zeno Maggiore church. The highlight of the interior is Titian's lovely Assumption (1535-40) and outside there is a Romanesque cloister in which the excavated ruins of earlier churches are visable. The 8th century baptistry, or San Giovanni in Fonte (St John of the Spring), was built from Roman masonry; the marble font was carved in 1200.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Duomo

    by Sjalen Written May 21, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Verona cathedral is recognisable on its white tower which you can see from various parts of the city. It is one of the nicest churches I have been to and yet not the most fantastic in Verona! The interesting thing about it is that it is in an area previously occupied by older churches, a monastery and much more and so, you can see the foundations of these older buildings in the church crypt, including some lovely Roman mosaics! They don't know if these were part of a Roman bath, a Minerva temple or exactly what as that's how much there was under the Duomo. Here you also find the little baptism chapel of San Giovanni in Fonte. There are also interesting art and architecture from more modern times in the church itself and on its entrance, notably the Roman portal by Nicolò and a Tizian painting. A real treasure trove.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral - Il Duomo

    by croisbeauty Updated Jul 24, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The interior of the Cathedral is spasious and impressive. Two lines of powerful ribbed piers branch out to support the Gothic vaulting, dividing the nave from the aisles.
    At the end of the right aisle, in the Cappella Mazzanti, lies the Tomb of Saint Agatha, a masterpiece by a follower of Bonino da Campione, dated 1353.
    The cathedral's main chapel contains remarkable frescoes by Francesco Torbido painted in the dome of the apse and on the arch.
    A marble semicircular choir screen by Michele Sanmicheli (1534) encloses the main chapel and presbytery.
    The first chapel contains the famous altarpiece by Titian, "the Assumption".

    the interior of the cathedral splandid altar of the cathedral
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral - Il Duomo

    by croisbeauty Updated Jul 24, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is a splendid canopy above the doorway of the Cathedral, composed of two arches, one above the other. It is an example of the Romanesques style developed in Verona and the Po valley, ascribed to Master Nicolo and his school who built the entrance in 1138.
    The right hand side of the building, the only one completely visible, is of great interest, with its lovely side door, as is also the apse with its excellent relief work executed by Veronese craftsmen.

    the cathedral
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral - Il Duomo

    by croisbeauty Updated Jul 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Matricolare, the Cathedral of Verona, stands in a small square flanked with ancient buildings, which create a perfect setting for the lovely old church, that stands partly on the site of a very ancient and pre-existing basilica. It was consecrated in 1187, although building and decoration continued long after this date.
    The design of facade is unsual because of the mixture of Romanesque and Gothic elements it contains.
    The belltower is still not complete, despite work carried out on it recently by the architect Fagiuoli. The 16th century middle section is by Sanmicheli.

    Il Duomo the portal the cloister
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • montezaro's Profile Photo

    Duomo

    by montezaro Updated Jan 3, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the other side of the River Adige, across the Ponte Pietra, is situated the San Pietro Hill and the Castle of S. Pietro. From the top of that hill there is a spectacular view on the city of Verona and the Adige River. In the focus of my camera is Duomo, the Cathedral of Verona.

    Duomo di Verona
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Verona

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

31 travelers online now

Comments

View all Verona hotels