Fun things to do in Verona

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    Kids day trip: the acquarium and the petrified zoo

    by Claudilla Written Oct 5, 2012

    Bolca, now 800 m over the sea level, was once a tropical sea. We are talking about the world most important finding of tropical fishes of the geological tertiary period.
    More than 240 species of fishes have been found, all perfectly preserved thanks to a thin calcareous rock that has virtually sealed the inhabitants of this 48.000 old laguna.
    This fossils museum it is definately worth a visit,considering Bolca is such a small village, the museum is well organised with windowed displays, geographical maps and informations.
    The place is fascinating, it is not enough to keep you busy for the whole day, but it can be combined with a walk on the nearby mountains , and a picnic (weather permitting).. Italy is normally quite generous in this way !

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    The Castle hill

    by croisbeauty Updated Jul 5, 2012

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    The hill of San Pietro rises on the eastern bank of the river Adige. On the tophill there is a Castle of S. Pietro from where you can enjoy in the magnificient panoramic view of the town. Right below the Castle there is a Roman Theatre, Archeological Museum and the church of Saints Sirius and Libera.

    San Pietro
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    Enjoy the architecture.....

    by leics Written Apr 15, 2012

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    Like many Italian cities and towns (and villages) there are many architectural pleasures to be spotted and many clues to the age of buidings.

    Just make sure you remember to look up; modern shop frontages do not mean the building itself is modern!

    Here are a few bits and pieces that I saw on my brief visit...I'm sure you'll find plenty more! :-)

    Bell tower Medieval headwear Reused Roman stones (from the theatre) Checkered decoration Ancient, buttressed wall
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    Great views from the Lamberti Tower

    by mikelisaanna Updated Feb 19, 2012

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    The Lamberti tower is in the heart of Verona's central historic district. It is over 80 meters high, making it the highest building in the area. You enter it through a courtyard in an old palace near the Piazza dell Erbe. After climbing a few hundred steps (or paying some money and taking the elevator), you reach an observation platform that gives you amazing views of the city.

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    Visit the Land of the Valpolicella

    by cmcard2 Updated Jan 18, 2012

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    Corte Figaretto is a family run estate in Valpantena, just North of Verona. It is owned by the Bustaggi family.

    On my last trip i began to learn about Valpolicella wines by visiting a small
    family owned winery on the outskirts of Verona called Corte Figaretto. It is
    made from three grape varieties - Corvina, Rondinella, and Molinara.

    The three types of wine they produce are Valpolicella, Ripasso, and Amarone -
    Valpolicella di Amarone is known around the world.

    We were fortunate to have a private tour of the estate and its immaculate cellars. The Ripasso was my personal favorite. This type of wine is passed over or "repassed" through the Amarone grapes.

    The small estate with vineyards facing south relies on a personal touch of not only the picking of grapes but a gravity system as opposed to a mechanical system.

    The family also produces Olive Oil, which is hand picked as well.

    Entrance to Corte Figaretto The Wine Cellars of Corte Figaretto Grapes are hand picked by the Bustaggi Family The three wines of Corte Figaretto The Immaculate Tuscan Inspired Cantine
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    The City Gates - Porta Palio

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 11, 2011

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    This gateway takes its name from a "Palio" or horserace which used to be run in the vicinity. It was once known as the Porta di San Sisto and is Sanmicheli's masterpiece in his capacity as a military architect.
    The outer facade is built of smooth square-hewn stones rigorously partitioned by paired columns, while the inner consists of five openings, in which classical simplicity merges with delightful Mannerist decoration.
    The gateway was built between 1542 and 1557.
    Stradone Porta Palio, right behind the gateway, leads you in front of Castelvecchio. If you turn on the right in Circonvallazione A. Oriani you can reach to Verona Zoo park.

    Porta Palio
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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The churches - San Giorgietto dei Domenicani

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 6, 2011

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    The Church of San Giorgietto, errected by Domenicans at the end of 13th and the beginning of 14th century, is adjacent to the Santa Anastasia. In 1424 the church assumpted name of San Pietro Martire and passed into brotherhood of the same name.
    It has significant examples of the 14th century sculptures work, the tomb of Bavarino de'Crescenzi from 1346, which is above the main entrance and L'arco di Giuglielmo Bastelbarco which is situated at the arch above entrance to the convent. Besides, this church preserves valuable 14th century frescoes in its interiors.

    San Giorgietto dei Comenicani L'arco di Castelbarco
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    Parco della Muralla

    by Jefie Updated Jun 20, 2010

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    Just on the outskirts of the historic part of Verona lies a nice park called Parco della Muralla. In fact, the park was built around the city's old fortifications which, together with the Adige River, used to protect the city from attacks. One of the city's gates, called "Porta Nuova", which used to provide the main access to the city centre, is still there. There are some walking trails, benches and picnic tables in the park, which makes it a nice little place to escape from the bustling city on a sunny day.

    Walking around the Parco della Muralla Part of Verona's old fortifications Porta Nuova, in Verona
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    Modern art and more at Palazzo Forti

    by Jefie Updated Jun 17, 2010

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    Palazzo Forti actually dates back to the 13th century and many noble men have lived there throughout the years until its very last owner, Achille Forti, left it to the city of Verona in 1937 along with his wishes that the Palazzo be converted into a modern art museum. However, it wasn't until 1982 that city officials finally succeeded in establishing the Galleria d'Arte Moderna at Palazzo Forti. The museum houses an interesting permanent collection called "Broken Boundaries", as well as other exhibitions. When we were there, we got to see "The Living Earth - The Landscape in Veronese Collections", a collection of paintings from the past 150 years that moves nicely from the more classic landscape paintings to the very modern ones. There also happened to be a very interesting exhibition of photographs relating Anne Frank's story - we spent at least an hour looking at the different pannels that offered information about the young Jewish girl's life along with excerpts from her diary in Italian and English.

    This museum was not included in the Verona Card. Admission was 6 Euros, and given the quality of the exhibitions I thought it was worth the price.

    Main entrance to the Galleria d'Arte Moderna
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    Santa Maria Assunta, Verona's Duomo

    by Jefie Updated Jun 13, 2010

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    Built in the Romanesque style, Santa Maria Assunta is Verona's main cathedral. It dates back to the 12th century and it was built on the site where two churches that were destroyed in the 1117 earthquake used to stand. In fact, it's still possible to see the remains of those two churches by stepping through the side door that leads to the church of Santa Elena and the San Giovanni in Fonte baptistery, which might be the cathedral's most interesting features along with Titian's "Assunta" (not to be confused with the one in Venice). The small church of Santa Elena dates back to the 9th century and although it was damaged during the earthquake, it was quickly restored. A glass panel laid on the floor of the altar makes it possible to see some architectural remains. The baptistery is also quite impressive - it was carved out of one single marble block at the beginning of the 12th century and the eight sculpted panels that make up its orthogonal shape are in remarkable condition.

    Entrance to the cathedral is included in the Verona Card.

    The cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta Inside Verona's Duomo The roof of the main chapel Inside the church of Santa Elena
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    How to file a compliant for usury....

    by effeti Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    .... in medieval times!

    On the "take a look at the walls" tip serie... this is just another episode.
    Heritage of the Venetian domination times (1405-1501), in a wall of one of the government building was installed a special stoney "mailbox" to collect anonymous complaints against usury.

    That "lion mouth" mailbox is still there, in Piazza Dante (or dei Signori), as you can see it in the picture.

    The sign says (in ancient Italian)
    DENUNZIE SECRET.
    CONTRO USURARI
    E CONTRATI
    USURATICI DI
    QUALUNQUE SORTE,

    more or less
    SECRET ACCUSATIONS
    AGANIST USURERS
    AND USURARY CONTRACTS
    OF ANY KIND

    That was not an era on fair trials...

    Mailbox for anonimous complaints....

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  • effeti's Profile Photo

    Look at the walls, too!

    by effeti Updated Dec 18, 2009

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    When you walk around the Verona center, take a look at the walls of the builings, they may hide little tresures, like some roman sculptured piece of marble here or there.

    This one in the picture is a little off the beaten path, but it's very big. Part of a sculptured roman monumental tomb, representing the faces of the family members.

    The scuplture isn't in a museum, but inserted in the outer side of the longobard Verona walls (along via Pallone) just at the beginning of Via del Pontiere.

    You can walk along it!

    Pic #2 shows a roman inscription at the beginning of Via Rosa, Piazza Erbe side.
    It tells:

    GAVIA Q. F. MAXIMA
    IN AQVAM HS Q. ((( I )))
    ...AMENTO DEDIT

    Translated from, latin, more or less "Gavia Maxima, daughter of Quintus, gave with her last will 500,000 sestertia for the wateryes". The rich woman of the Gavia family (the same of the arch) made a gift to the town of an acqueduct bringing fresh water from Valpolicella to the town center. How kind of her!

    Pic #3 shows some carved stones used in the pillars of the east gate of the Scaligery palace north of Piazza Bra, one of the entrances of Cortile Mercato Vecchio

    Pic#4 is another roman marble. An ancient bracket with a sculpted Gorgon's head (on a side) and a Triton playing a Buccina on the other . You can see it at the corner of Corso Portoni Borsari and Via Valerio Catullo (close to Porta Borsari)

    A roman sculpture along the street. The gift of... and acqueduct! Carved marbles roman  marbles in a corner (C.so Portoni Borsari)
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    Bridges

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 29, 2009

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    Only six main bridges cross over into the old city, and three are from the 13th century, maybe renovated somewhat. Floods were commonplace for the river Adige until a dam and backflow was created in 1970's. The main bridge is Ponte Pietra. It was destroyed during WWI, but repaired and rebuilt. The Ponte Peitra has two arches dating back to 50 BC still remaining

    Ponte Scalgiero-the famous one Pietra in background-look past us Bridge Pietra to the hill Common bridge in the background form the north end
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    Historical Walk through the City Center

    by csordila Updated Jun 23, 2009

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    Verona is small enough to walk around in, especially in its most interesting Roman center.

    Piazza della Erbe, the local market located between the Via Mazzini and the Corso Porta Borsari, is lovely for a browse amongst the stalls. I found that they sold much the same souvenirs as in Venice - but cheaper.
    It served as a Roman forum. You can progress to the frescoed Loggia del Consiglio along a passage over which hangs the rib of a whale. In the middle of the square is the Madonna Verona Fountain from the 14th century.
    You can find here not only many historic buildings, sculptures but a popular and colorful market with fresh fruits and vegetables, as well.
    The 84 meters high Torre Lamberti is the tallest building in Verona. At the top of the tower are the Rengo and Marangona bells. Both of these bells date back from 1464. Just be aware of them, while you are up there, they can be quite loud. The view from here is marvelous!
    Behind the busy Piazza Erbe, on Piazza dei Signoria we can admire a statue of Dante together with the surrounding historical buildings which are joined with elegant arches, mostly dating from the 14th century.

    The Old Castle of Castelvecchio ( Corso Castelvecchio 2 ) with its brick towers and turrets is a fairy-tale place. The castle built in the 13th century has its own stone bridge, the Ponte Scaligero, used as an escape route by the fleeing Castle-Lords.
    After an intensive restoration it houses now a fascinating museum with masterworks by Tintoretto, Tiepolo, Veronese, Bellini, and the Verona-born Pisanello. It is opened daily from 9am to 6.30pm, except on Mondays, admission fee €3.10.

    The Roman amphitheater, the Arena of Verona is the third largest arena of its kind, with a seating capacity of twenty thousand (only beaten by the Colisseum in Rome, and that in the Imperial playground of Capua). It was built during the last years of the emperor Augustus.
    Don't be surprised to find the arena still in use. Today there are no gladiators and wild beasts, the acts that used to pull in the blood-thirsty spectators.
    Nowadays the arena is used among others for the Summer Opera Festival. The first performance started in the summer of 1913 playing Aida by Giuseppe Verdi.
    When there is no opera, you may visit in the afternoon for a fee of €3.10.
    Notice: And while you cannot miss the arena it is quite easy to miss the entrance - follow the wall clockwise, and not anti-clockwise!

    Piazza dell Erbe Dante ....follow the wall clockwise! Castle of Castelvecchio and its own stone bridge Madonna Verona Fountain and Torre Lamberti Madonna Verona Fountain and Torre Lamberti
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    Roman theatre -fabulous

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 18, 2009

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    It is amazing that so much of this theater is still intact from its origin 1st century AD. The stage does exist, and the seating is still there in good shape given its years in the weather. Built on St. Peters hill, with Castel San Pietro on top. Due to deterioration, floods, and the 1117 earthquake, it was abandoned, the theater was not in use for many years. It became a convent and a church, building on the old structure forms. Due to excavation done in the 17t century and continued through the 19t century, the theater was revived. It was even used as a competing theater of the arena for years after WWII. In 1834, Andrea Monga bought a lot of the homes that were on top of the ruins. In 1904 Verona bought the complex and continued the excavation of the site.
    There are great artifacts of columns, flooring tiles, pictures, and also the loggia areas and what seems to be a living quarter in that era.
    This is one of the best sites, that in my opinion compares to the arena for fame. Open 8:30 to 19:30 except Monday. A Verona card gives you access at a discount, otherwise the cost is around 6 Euro. The tour greeters are friendly and helpful-but the tour is self guided through the crypts, and inside the buildings.

    Hill where theater and castle Pietra located Old ruins among more modern-15th century Amphiteatre seating Artifacts and loggia in courtyard Columns from the past Roman era
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Comments (1)

  • oriettaIT's Profile Photo
    Nov 19, 2013 at 3:13 AM

    For anybody interested in Impressionist art, there is a great exhibition going on in Verona right now, here the link for more informations lineadombra.it/en/verso-mone...
    I have been to several exhibit organized by the same people and they have always been great!

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