Piazza Bra, Verona

4.5 out of 5 stars 52 Reviews

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    Piazza Brà
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  • Piazza Brà
    Piazza Brà
    by Twan
  • Piazza Brà
    Piazza Brà
    by Twan
  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    The Tosca stage

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 22, 2014

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    1. Piazza Bra from the Arena
    4 more images

    In 2006 I unfortunately didn't see the new production of Puccini's Tosca, which is too bad because it was highly praised by the critics. The staging, set design, costumes and lighting for Tosca were all by Hugo de Ana (not Zeffirelli).

    While other operas were being performed, they stored parts of the Tosca stage set out on Piazza Bra. (The building in the background is called the Gran Guardia, by the way.)

    Second photo: Parts of the Tosca stage, from above.

    Third photo: Evidently they used this wooden wagon in Tosca.

    Fourth and fifth photos: Cannons and other stage elements from Tosca.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Piazza Bra

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 22, 2014

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    1. Piazza Bra from the Arena
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    These folks are at the top of the Arena steps looking out at Piazza Bra, which is the big open square in front of the Arena. The building in the background is the City Hall.

    Second photo: Looking out at another corner of Piazza Bra.

    Third photo: Part of Piazza Bra at night after the opera performance.

    Fourth and fifth photos: If you walk around Piazza Bra past the front of the Arena in the late afternoon, you can look into some of the archways and see where they keep the costumes for the hundreds of supernumeraries (extra players) who appear in the operas.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Teatro Filarmonico

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 22, 2014

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    1. Teatro Filarmonico from Piazza Bra
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    This historic theater was built on the Via Roma, at one corner of the Piazza Bra, starting in 1716. For three decades it was the city's opera house, until it burned down (set on fire by a forgotten torch) on the night of January 21st, 1749. But it was rebuilt, and reopened in 1754.

    191 years later the theater was destroyed again, this time by an air raid on February 23rd, 1945. But again it was rebuilt, and was reopened in 1975.

    Today the Filarmonico is not only an opera venue. Besides operas, they put on numerous other musical events such as concerts and ballets. There are no performances there during the summer, but I did notice an orchestra rehearsal going on there.

    Second photo: Entrance to the box office on Via Roma (with bicycles).

    Third photo: Colonnade of the Teatro Filarmonico on Via Roma.

    Fourth photo: Back of the Teatro Filarmonico.

    Fifth photo: Stage entrance.

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  • Twan's Profile Photo

    Piazza Brà

    by Twan Written Oct 17, 2013

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    Piazza Br��
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    The Bra’ (from the German "breit", meaning "broad") began to be defined as a square only around mid sixteenth century, when Michele Sammicheli built the Palace of the Honours and gave a correct perspective to the Arena, limiting the perimeter of the future square towards the west. Another contribution was made by construction of the Palace of the Grand Guard, which defines the southern limit of the area. After paving of the area, which was finished in 1782, the Brà became the preferred place for a vespers stroll, instead of Lord’s Square. Around mid XII century, it was used for the wood, hay, straw and livestock market, to the extent that ancient documents often refer to the Brà as the “livestock market”. The traditional fair of Saint Lucy survives as a remnant of the ancient custom of holding a fair in Piazza Brà. This recurrence takes place each year between the 11th and 13th of December.
    Monuments. See the respective analytical cards for the Arena and Lapidary Museum

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    4 saints watching over Via Mazzini

    by globetrott Updated Nov 1, 2012

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    4 saints watching over Via Mazzini

    There is this small column right in the middle of the street, where Via Mazzini starts on Piazza Bra and high above the ground you will see the sculptured reliefs of 4 saints watching over the people passing by.
    I could not find any explanations about it in my books, but still I think it is worth to take a closer look.

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    A great fresco in Via Mazzini / Piazza Bra

    by globetrott Updated Nov 1, 2012

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    A great fresco in Via Mazzini / Piazza Bra

    Don't oversee this great fresco in the very beginning of Via Mazzini and at the same time still facing Piazza Bra. Most of the colors have faded away unfortunately, but still you will see some great details of that very special work of art.
    For me such small sights along my way through an old town are somehow more important than some of the tourist-traps everybody is going to...

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Piazza Bra - right in front of the Arena di Verona

    by globetrott Updated Nov 1, 2012

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    Piazza Bra - right in front of the Arena di Verona

    Piazza Bra is the the name of the big square right in front of the famous Arena di Verona, that dates back to the roman empire and is more than 2000 years old now.
    Piazza Bra is still used for various festivities, like a big festivity that was going on, while we were there. They had a lovely performance of dancers, exotic music and culinary delights.
    Piazza Bra is the place, where you will mostly be dropped by the busdrivers, in case you make a stop-over of 1 or 2 hours, while taking a bustour through Italy.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    PIAZZA BRA

    by draguza Updated Jul 28, 2012

    With a heritage that dates back more than two thousand years, Verona was once a very important Roman town, and today remains one of Italy’s best kept archeological sites. The historical center lies hidden behind the town’s roman walls, and it is within these ancient stones that the majority of the monuments and historic sites can be located. First up, head down to the Piazza Bra; a large open square dominated by the famous Roman Arena. In Roman times, this was the principal area for entertainment, seating over 20,000 spectators. The high arched structure arena has been impeccably reserved, and is now open to a contemporary public to come and have a look around. If visiting the city in the summer months, one of the most famous local events is the summer opera season which is held in this impressive amphitheater, and is a truly amazing location and spectacular event not to be missed

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  • catherineneill's Profile Photo

    People watching spot!

    by catherineneill Written May 5, 2011

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    arena from the piazza bra

    After either a long days shopping or sightseeing you should dump your bags at your feet and grab an ice cream or 'gelato' at one of the many ice cream parlours in Piazza Bra.

    There are some beautiful buildings in this square including the arena, but also the town hall and the old city gates.

    Stay on a bit later and have dinner in one of the numerous restaurants or take a stroll along the quaint cobbles . Great people watching spot and very romantic!

    Unfortunately this is a very popular area so in summer be prepared to face crowds. Also the restaurants are pricey and there are better and cheaper places to eat.

    But do grab a coke or an icecream and spend a few hours soaking up the unique atmosphere of Verona!

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Piazza Bra'

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    the liston of Piazza Bra'

    Piazza Bra' is the most known square of Verona, because it is where the Arena lies. This picture, taken from inside the Arena, shows the liston, i.e. the part of Venetian squares adhibited to walks.

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  • Avieira67's Profile Photo

    Piazza Bra

    by Avieira67 Updated Aug 8, 2009

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    Entrance of the Piazza Bra
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    Piazza Bra is the pivotal point of the modern city, not only for the famous Arena, but also for many palaces that carry the names of the most important Veronese families.
    Museum of Stones [18th century] is located near the Bra Gates;
    Gran Guardia Palace [17th century] was planned by Domenico Curtoni;
    Palazzo Barbieri (City Hall) was planned by the architect Barbierithe in neocalssic style;
    Located to the north-west is the Liston with its Ottoman buildings between which the Guastaverza, one of the works of Michele Sanmicheli, stands out;
    In the middle of the square is a large area of grass and flowers with statues in memory of Victor Emmanuel III [1883] and the Monument Partigiano (Partisan) del Salazzari.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The Town Centre

    by viddra Updated Jul 28, 2009

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    Palazzo Barbieri
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    Piazza Bra's the largest square in Verona, with public gardens, containing a statue of King Victor Emmanuel II erected in 1883 and a statue commemorating the Partisan, and a lot of important buildings such as the Palazzo della Gran Guardia (1610), Palazzo Barbieri (1838) with the Town Hall offices, and the Amphitheatre.

    So, my advice for you would be to take a walk through the town centre and enjoy the surroundings.

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Piazza Bra

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Jan 3, 2009

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    Piazza Bra

    Here you find the Arena, lots of restaurants, the City Hall and the statue of Victor Emanuelle II.
    But instead of sitting in a restaurant, I just bought a pizza, a coke and sat down under the trees of the Piazza enjoying the sun and watching people come and go, just like a picnic.
    As I was so relaxed and entertained by the landscape that I forgot to take a picture of the Piazza, but I put this one!

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Arena Square

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    Long range view of the restaurants
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    There are a number of eating and sipping places along the square. During our visit it was not very crowded; it was raining. I could tell that it would get rather full during a normal tourist season day. The prices here are steep, because of the access by the entry to old city and adjacent to the arena.

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  • Vanity666's Profile Photo

    Piazza Bra

    by Vanity666 Written Aug 6, 2007

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    4 more images

    The heart of the Veronese beats in Piazza Bra and not simply because the world-famous Arena is the piazza's centrepiece. Walking in piazza Bra after a while you get used to the sight of it and tend not to notice it any more. The 'liston' of the Piazza Bra, or the paving stones laid in 1770 to facilitate the elegant passage of the bourgeoisie, is what saved it from mediocrity at the end of the 1700's. Today the piazza is crowned with many palaces that carry the names of the most important Veronese families.

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