Ponte Pietra, Verona

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  • Ponte Pietra
    Ponte Pietra
    by Twan
  • Ponte Pietra
    Ponte Pietra
    by Twan
  • Ponte Pietra
    Ponte Pietra
    by Twan
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    Ponte Pietra

    by Twan Updated Oct 22, 2013
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    The Ponte Pietra, formerly also known as “pons marmoreus” (marble bridge), is one of the oldest bridges in the city. At the foundation of Verona in 90 BC a wooden bridge crossed the Adige River here, which was replaced by a stone bridge by the Romans. In the Middle Ages the bridge was destroyed several times by floods and rebuilt time and again. Having been destroyed once again in the 16th century, the five-arch bridge seen today was built. The last time the Ponte Pietra was destroyed was in 1945 when German soldiers blew it up on their retreat. The bridge was restored to its former glory in 1959.

    On the left bank downstream you can see the remains of the ancient arches of the old bridge. The two central arches of the Ponte Pietra, built of brick, are remnants from the Middle Ages. The bridge’s eventful history and the preservation of elements from all periods, from ancient times to the present, have made the bridge a symbol of Verona’s history.

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    Adige and Ponte Pietra

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 9, 2012

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    Adige

    The Ponte Pietra (Italian for "Stone Bridge") is a Roman arch bridge crossing the Adige River. The bridge was completed in 100 BC, and the Via Postumia from Genua to the Brenner Pass passed over it.
    It originally flanked another Roman bridge, the Pons Postumius; both structures provided the city (on the right bank) with access to the Roman theatre on the east bank. The arch nearest to the right bank of the Adige was rebuilt in 1298 by Alberto I della Scala.

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    Ponte Pietra..not really roman but...

    by leics Written Apr 15, 2012

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    Once the Pons Marmoreus, this Roman bridge over the river Adige was completed in 100BC and must once have been incredibly busy...it lies on the route from Genoa over the Brenner Pass.

    Perhaps that's why the Romans built another bridge alongside (the Pons Postumius): perhaps it was a system of traffic management (especially as the Roman theatre is on the other side of the river to the town centre)? :-)

    The stone bridge collapsed (possibly due to the effects of floodwaters) and was repaired in 1007, 1153 and 1232 and 1239. In 1503 it was repaired again, but the stone structure collapsed and was replaced with a wooden bridge for a short time.

    The bridge was destroyed by retreating Germans in 1945. At that time the bridge had five arches: two were Roman (stone), one was built in 1298 and the other two were rebuilt in 1520.

    Rebuilding took place from 1957-59, using original materials, and the present bridge is considered to be an accurate reconstruction.

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  • Turska's Profile Photo

    Ponte Pietra

    by Turska Written Sep 18, 2010

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    I think it was worth of visit, just because of the silhouette of the town. The town looked so different from here and it was good kind of different!
    I don´t know if the water allways run there, but now it did. I took lots of photos.
    When going back to old town, I noticed the locks at the barrier. Those are seen in many countries today, but I´m so romantic, I allways take photos of them again..

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    Ponte Pietra - The Roman Bridge

    by Herkbert Written Jul 17, 2010

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    if you want to cross the river up in the northeast section of the city, you'll likely cross at Ponte Pietra, also known as the Roman Bridge. You get some beautiful views of the river from and around the bridge.

    The white stones on the bridge are from the original bridge built back in 1 BC. Unfortunately, the original bridge was bombed back during WWII, but many pieces of the original marble were used in its reconstruction.

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    Ponte Pietra, the Roman bridge

    by Jefie Updated Jun 17, 2010

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    Ponte Pietra stretching across the Adige River
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    With the Adige River looping around the city of Verona, there are numerous bridges of architectural interest connecting the historic part of town to the other bank. My favourite one is the oldest one, called Ponte Pietra ("stone bridge") or sometimes Ponte Romano, a bridge that dates back to the 1st century BC. It was originally built to give the population access to the Roman theatre built on the east bank of the Adige River at around the same time. Through the course of history, the arch bridge sustained considerable damage, especially during the Second World War when it was bombed by the German troops as they were leaving the city in order to slow down the Allies. However, the bridge was always restored, and whenever possible the original material was retrieved from the water in order to remain as faithful as possible to the original design. It results in an interesting mix of bricks and stones and, in my opinion, it's the city's nicest bridge.

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    See and cross the roman bridge "ponte Pietra"

    by effeti Updated Jun 4, 2009

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    Ponte Pietra ("Stone bridge") is a roman bridge, helping people to cross the river Adige for more than 2,000 years.
    The name is obviously from the stone that was the unique material in which it was built (and probably, after the fall of the roman empire, no one was able to build a bridge all in stone for centuries)
    It is still standing, but what you can see now it is not all made of stone.... In fact the nature (a few floodings) and men hit it many times. At the end of our last war (WWII) the retiring Wermacht thought, a few days before of the total sourrender of april, 1945, that it was a threat to leave it standing, and destroed it with explosive. The lost stone were replaced by masonry when it wa re-built (BTW, same destiny occurred to the medieval masonry bridge of Castel Vecchio).
    Despite years and destructions, it makes a wonderful view of one of the most scenic parts of Verona.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The Roman times of Verona - Ponte Pietra

    by croisbeauty Updated Sep 22, 2005

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    Ponte Pietra, the Stone Bridge, is the most beautiful bridge across the river Adige. It is located just a foot from the Duomo and it is the easiest way to reach the Archeological Museum, the Castle of S. Pietro, the Church of S. Stefano and the Church of S.Giorgio in Braida, which lies opposite of the Duomo.
    Verona had two bridges in Roman times, and this one, which was formerly known as the "Pons Marmoreus", is the only one that remains. Fragments of the other one, known as the "Postumio", are visible on the banks of the river near the Church of St. Anastasia.
    Ponte Pietra dates from the pre-Augustan period, and has five arches. The arch next to the right hand bank was rebuilt in 1298, together with the tall watch tower, by Alberto della Scala. Most of the four arches on the left, and some of the piers were destroyed at the end of the Second World War.

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    Ponte Pietra

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 16, 2005

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    Ponte Pietra is located on one of the main bends of the River Adige where the opposite bank offers panoramic views over the city. The bridge was built some time in the 1st century BC - prior to 89 BC - the year Verona became a latin colony, when a wooden bridge may have crossed on the same site as this present bridge following the construction of Via Postumia, which ran from Genoa to Aquileia, in 148 BC. The bridge has, however, collasped many times in 1007, 1153, 1232 and 1239. In 1503 the bridge was rebuilt in stone but collapsed again and was rebuilt in wood. In 1508 the City Council asked architect Fra' Giocondo to rebuild the construction of the Roman bridge. The Germans blew the bridge up on 25 April 1945 and only the first arch from the right bank was left standing. The bridge was then fully reconstructed in 1959.

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    Ponte Pietra

    by montezaro Written Jan 3, 2004

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    Ponte Pietra

    Ponte Pietra, the Stone Bridge, is the only one bridge left from the Roman times of Verona. It is, undoubtely, the most beautuful bridge of the town. Ponte Pietra connects the old core of the town and the remnants of the Roman amphitheatre which is situated bellow the San Pietro Hill.

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    Ponte Pietra

    by viddra Written Jun 16, 2007

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    Ponte Pietra

    Verona had two bridges in Roman times, and only this one has survived.

    It was built with five arches, but reconstructed. Therefore the contrast.

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