Romeo & Juliet, Verona

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"Casa di Giulietta," Via Cappello, 23, 37121 Verona VR, Italy +39 045 803 4303

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  • Bust of William Shakespeare.
    Bust of William Shakespeare.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Juliet's House
    Juliet's House
    by IreneMcKay
  • Juliet's House
    Juliet's House
    by IreneMcKay
  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Casa di Romeo

    by Jefie Updated Jun 20, 2010

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    Unlike Juliet's house, the house which is said to have been that of her Romeo has not yet been turned into a tourist attraction. In fact, it's a nice but fairly non-descript house sitting a few steps away from Piazza dei Signori, on Via Arche Scaligere, in the same neighborhood as Juliet's house. The only way you can recognize it is thanks to a plaque on the wall that includes some lines from Shakespeare's play, starting with "O, where is Romeo?". The house is believed to have once belonged to the Montecchi family, which apparently was similar enough to make a connection with Shakespeare's Montagues. I must admit that I was suprised to see how little attention was being paid to Romeo's house, especially with all the hype surrounding the Casa di Giulietta. I wouldn't be surprised if the situation were to change eventually, seems like such a good opportunity to keep the legend alive!

    Casa di Romeo, in Verona Another reference to Shakespeare near Piazza Bra
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    Tomba di Giulietta - Juliet's tomb?!

    by Jefie Written Jun 17, 2010

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    Here's a site that's as strange as it is unique. The monastery of San Francesco al Corso is first and foremost a small museum (Museo degli Affreschi) that houses different religious paintings, frescoes and sculptures. However, most visitors just breeze through the museum in order to see the crypt that contains Juliet's tomb. Just like it was the case with Juliet's house, rumours somehow started floating around that the church of San Francesco al Corso was where Romeo and Juliet had gotten married, and that the two lovers came to their untimely end shortly after their wedding day in the monastery's crypt. It's common knowledge that the tomb described as Juliet's only dates back to 1937 and that it was most probably added after the success of the 1936 "Romeo and Juliet" movie starring Leslie Howard as Romeo, Norma Shearer as Juliet, and John Barrymore as Mercutio. But that doesn't stop people from all around the world from paying their respect to Giulietta, or lovers from getting married at the church of San Francesco al Corso (there was effectively a wedding going on when we were there).

    Well... it's included in the Verona Card, so why not?!

    Tomba di Giulietta in Verona Another view of Juliet's tomb Excerpt from Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet One of the museum's statues
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    Casa di Giulietta

    by Jefie Updated Jun 13, 2010

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    About a century before William Shakespeare wrote the play "Romeo and Juliet", there already was a story going around Italy about two young lovers coming to a tragic end. Luigi da Porto was the first author to set the story in Verona and to name its main characters Romeo and Giulietta. The building that stands at No. 23 Via Cappello dates back to the 12th century and once belonged to the Capello family, which people began associating with the name Capuleti, and thus a new legend was born. "Juliet's house" is now one of the most visited sites in all of Verona. People come to profess their love on Juliet's wall by leaving letters, post-its or graffitis. In the lovely inner courtyard, it's also possible to see Juliet's balcony and a bronze statue of Juliet - if you're wondering why her right breast is so shiny, it's because people believe that touching it will make you lucky in love.

    Most people don't bother going inside the house, but as it was included in the Verona Card I went in to take a look. There are some Romeo & Juliet movie props on display, along with different editions of Shakespeare's play. There are computers available if you want to send an e-mail to Juliet (who knew she'd gotten so modern!), and of course you can get your picture taken on Juliet's balcony. It also gives you a nice idea of what a medieval house in Verona looks like from the inside.

    Standing on Juliet's balcony, waiting for my Romeo Letters to Juliet Juliet's bed from the 1968 Zeferelli movie I'd rather hold her arm than her boob!!
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    Capulet House

    by Tom_Fields Written Jan 19, 2010

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    The Capulet, or Capuletti, family was engaged in a bitter power struggle with the Montecchi, or Montague, family. Dante lived in Verona about the time of their feud, which he alludes to in his Divine Comedy. Legends about two star-crossed lovers from these families have been bandied about since the 14th century; Shakespeare borrowed from them to write Romeo and Juliet.

    The Capulet house has a balcony, specially constructed to replicate the famous one in Shakespeare's play. It's a tourist attraction, and while not quite authentic, certainly worth a visit if you're in a romantic mood.

    The Capuletti house A tiny sample of the graffitti
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    Casa Di Giulietta

    by viddra Updated Jul 27, 2009

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    Pretend to be Juliet and step out on the famous balcony of Juliet's house to talk to your Romeo!

    This tall building from the 13th century is identified with the House of the Capulets, Juliet's family.

    Opening Hours: 8.30am-7.30pm Tue-Sun, 1.30pm-7.30pm Mon
    Cost of Entry: €3

    the famous balcony Juliet's house from the courtyard Juliet's room Juliet's dress
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    La casa di Giulietta

    by csordila Updated Jun 23, 2009

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    The tourism to Verona is not of Dante or of the Petrarch or dell’Arena, it is of Giulietta. However it is not even sure that Shakespeare ever visited Verona and the characters of the tragic story of Romeo and Juliet come from a story by Luigi da Porto of Vicenza.
    It is also not sure, whether Romeo and Juliet were living persons.

    The legend, that Juliet lived here, spread in the 19. century, since the house built in the 12. century, was the property of the Family Dal Capello (the name Capulet would come from here).
    From the courtyard you can see Juliet’s Balcony, which was added to the house during a restoration in the 1930s. The late addition of the balcony is a point of contention, though.
    But the highlight of the visit would be the bronze statue of Juliet in the courtyard.
    True or not, you may rub the right breast of Juliet's statue for good luck like everybody else.
    You can also see a lot of graffiti notes on the walls.

    Juliet's house is now the property of the state and is used to house a small museum and temporary art exhibitions. All the frescoes, paintings, and ceramics on display are genuine antiques from the 16th and 17th century, however, none of them have ever belonged to the Capulets.
    By the way, you can save money - 3 Eu for general entry and 7 Eu for the whole tour - if you just walk in the courtyard, sjnce it is free. The whole complex is opened daily from 9am to 7pm, except on Mondays, when is opened in the afternoon only.

    So, if Juliet lived here, what about Romeo? A couple of streets away the house at 4, Via Arche Scaligere has been designated as his home. It is private, so other than a sign on the wall there is nothing much to see.

    "There is no world without Verona walls,
    But purgatory, torture, hell itself.
    Hence-banished is banish'd from the world,
    And world's exile is death."

    —William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act III, Scene III

    ....plastered with love notes and graffiti The courtyard Statue Rub the right breast Legendary balcony
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    Juliet's House

    by TexasDave Written Jan 9, 2009

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    Since the story is fictional the house must be also, but, like they say, it's the thought that counts. It is, however, a very old house (13th century). The house's most photographed attraction is the balcony and visitors rub the right breast of Juliet's statue for luck.

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    Juliet's balcony

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Jan 3, 2009

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    This is one of the most visited spots in town, however it was very, very difficult to find! We got lost several times trying to find it so, we had to ask to locals for it. Of course Juliet didn't exist but tourists wanted to see something related with the story so, this balcony was made to satisfy all those dream-lovers. There is not so much to do there, just to see the balcony and if you wish you can go up there. There is also a Juliet statue, if you touch her right breast, it is supposed it'll bring you luck. There is a souvenir shop with lots of things with the name of 'Romeo and Juliet' printed on them but it was quite expensive. In the walls of the entrace of this place you can leave a love message or whatever you want. I'm not that superstitious but my sister wrote a note asking to find a special person and that same night she met a nice guy in Venice, needless to say they are in touch up to this date, seriously!!

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Romeo and Juliet

    by iandsmith Written Jan 3, 2009

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    Verona is home to Shakespeare's fictional yet legendary couple, and he only elaborated on a previously existing script. In actuality, the feuding Montagues and Capulets were inspired by the real Montecchi and Capello families from the area. Since Shakespeare's famous play, the city, ever with a mind to the tourist dollar, has fully empraced the Romeo and Juliet story. They have Juliet's house (balcony and all) as well as Juliet's Tomb, not to mention Giardino Guiliano, my personal choice of things to see (refer my general tips).
    The fact that the balcony that the busloads swoon over was only built in the 1930's makes little difference to the swarms - it's Via Capella or be damned!
    All fictional, but this detracts not one iota from the allure of the place. Hearts with names abound on the wall. Who am I to deny people their bit of romance?
    Still, at the risk of being petty, I find reality far more interesting and Verona has more than enough of that. Apart from the Scalegeris and Calgrande Ist who entertained Dante, there is a wealth of wonders, particularly in the churches. Do yourself a favour, visit the balcony if you must, but take time out to learn about the reality of the other things Verona has to offer. They're far more interesting I assure you.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Not Juliet-but today's lovely facsimile

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 2, 2008

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    This is THE tourist drop off to gawk at the balcony and the house. Made famous by Shakespeare story of lover unhappiness, he spoke to her on the balcony. So much graffitti and just grimey in the area, turned me off, as well s the number of people standing around, kind of wondering why am I here, maybe we should hang out a while. The home was built around 1300, and the balcony was added in 1936 in an effort to draw tourists to Verona. It is just off Piazza Erbe-south. Open 8:30-19:30 daily except Monday.

    The balcony-that is not Juliet hanging out Graffetti and tourists Other lovely balconies on the street
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  • Turska's Profile Photo

    House of Juliet

    by Turska Updated May 25, 2008

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    It was "must"thing to do in verona,even if it is only a fairytail.I´m a romantic,so i wanted to see it.it was very hard to find-I can´t even tell you how we found it,but ask from tourist-info,don´t loose time by trieing to find it without good map.
    Fun thing was the wall full of chewing-gums and names written on them,we also acted like teenagers and wrote our names to wall..

    wall of lovemessage-chewing-gums Juliets bed Statue of Juliet famous balcony dress used in old movie of Romeo and Juliet

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  • domenicococozza's Profile Photo

    where for art thou

    by domenicococozza Written Aug 7, 2007

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    No visit to Verona would be complete without a visit the the Romeo and Juliet Balcony.
    Sorry to say, when we visited, it didnt do anything for us. 10 minutes was enough and back to the Piazza for coffee. A the end of the day, its a balcony

    where for art thou romeo

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  • Vanity666's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Juliet

    by Vanity666 Written Aug 6, 2007

    Regardless of the ancient site that hosts it (the convent, which previously belonged to the Cappuccini Monks, dates from the XIII century), Juliet’s tomb as we now see it dates only back to 1937. That year, the Director of Veronese Museums Antonio Avena decided to give a new face to the site most identified as the place of burial of the Shakespearean heroine. An ancient red marble sarcophagus had lain in the garden of the former convent for decades, perhaps even centuries. With no cover, the completely empty sarcophagus was indicated as the place of burial of the beautiful Juliet, as early as the beginning of the nineteenth century.

    Today, Juliet’s tomb is the sight where civil weddings are celebrated: many couples come especially from abroad, to crown their dream of love in the place where Romeo and Juliet saw their hopes shattered. And here, in the den illuminated by the high gothic windows, where the empty tomb awaits the romantic tribute of visitors, a singular tradition was born: the habit of addressing messages of love to “Juliet, Verona”. An entire squad of secretaries gathers these messages and answers them, because the story of Juliet is legend, but the throes of love that afflict men and women from every continent are a reality.

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    Juliet's house

    by Vanity666 Written Aug 6, 2007

    The Capulet House, best known as "Juliet's House", dates back to the thirteenth century. It is tower-shaped and belonged to the Dal Cappello family, whose coat-of-arms is visible above the inner arch-way of the court-yard. The brick façade is decorated by elegant gothic windows standing on either side of the famous balcony on which Juliet is said to have spoken to Romeo.
    The house has several storeys and tickets can be bought to visit it. The interior contains the furniture of a typical fourteenth century aristocratic household, enhanced by a wide range of medieval ceramics. Antonio Avena's masterful restoration (carried out in 1935) brought to life the elegant frescoes within, and which highlight inlaid wooden chests, brick fireplaces, wooden staircases and landings.
    At the far end of the courtyard stands Nereo Costantini's bronze statue of Juliet visited by thousands of tourists every year from all over the world.

    Today, a thousands of love notes are written on the walls of the house. The tradition of writing messages dated 1937. when the first letter addressed "Julia, Verona" was found beside her tomb.

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    Balcony of Romeo and Juliette at Villa Capuleti

    by Santini738 Written Jul 17, 2007

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    Verona is the setting of the story of Romeo and Juliet, made famous by William Shakespeare. Although the earliest version of the story is set in Siena, not Verona — the move was made in Luigi da Porto's Istoria novellamente ritrovata di due Nobili Amanti — a balcony falsely claiming historical connection to the fictional lovers has become a tourist attraction for lovers; the short passageway leading to the balcony is covered with slips of paper carrying their graffiti, and a bronze statue of Juliet stands under the balcony, one breast polished by those touching it for luck.

    Balcony of Romeo and Juliette Balcony of Romeo and Juliette Statue of Juliet Writings on the wall
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