Romeo & Juliet, Verona

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  • Romeo & Juliet
    by Roadquill
  • Romeo & Juliet
    by Roadquill
  • Marble Plaque At Entrance
    Marble Plaque At Entrance
    by painterdave
  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Juliet's house - outside: the garden

    by Mikebond Updated Mar 28, 2005

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    Until some time ago, whoever wanted to say love words, could put a piece of paper on the walls of Juliet's garden.
    Luckily, the City Hall has decided to remove all of them and clean the garden. After that, it will be forbidden (I don't know if it is already) to put anything there. You'll be allowed to send SMS to your lover.

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    Juliet's House

    by Sjalen Written May 21, 2005

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    As most of you know, Romeo and Juliet wasn't a real couple. Nevertheless, there WAS an influential Capulet family in Verona and there is therefore a "Casa di Giulietta" in the street which today bears the family name (Capello). The house was originally a 13th century inn. Easily one of the biggest tourist traps I have ever seen, and in fact, so many tourists come only to see this and the surrounding Piazza delle Erbe, Arena and the shopping streets that you have huge chunks of the rest of the Old Town to yourself a lot of the time. Still, it is fun to see, especially for someone like me who more or less grew up in different theatres and who was an anglophile in my teens. Not that Shakespeare wrote the story of course. It was written by Vicenza man Luigi da Porto and, later walking in Vicenza, I found the house where da Porto died. Guess what? It had a balcony next to it. Wonder if that is in fact the REAL Juliet's balcony...To see just what a tourist trap this is, continue to my Tourist trap information and be amazed :)

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    Romeo's House

    by sandysmith Updated Aug 21, 2003

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    House of Romeo

    Keeep going on the road past the arches of the Scaligeri sarcophagi and you will notice a plaque on this unassuming building. Well this is purported to be Romeo's house. Its not open to the public - there's not much to see anyway - but seeing it completes the Romeo and Juliet connection in Verona.
    The Shakespear line is on the wall too :
    "Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo " - well he's not here anymore thats for sure!
    If you are in this area in the evening then pop next door to the Osteria al Duca - a great atmospheric taverna in Verona - see more in restaurant tips.

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  • montezaro's Profile Photo

    Giulietta's home

    by montezaro Updated Jan 3, 2004

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    The Statue of Giulietta

    Most of the tourists visiting Verona for the legend of two lovers, Romeo and Juliet, written by W. Shakespeare. In the courtyard of Juliet's house, which is always crowded with the tourists all over the world, stands the btonze statue of Juliet whom most of the visitors want to touch wishing luck in love.

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    The Tomb of Gulietta - Verona

    by susancallus Updated Jun 18, 2006

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    Gulietta's tomb

    We went to Gulietta's balcony the very first day we went to Verona but it wouldn't have been nice not to visit her tomb as well! It's not so far from the centre! Only 15 minutes by walk from the Arena. If you ask the receptionist of the hotel they will explain you exactly how to get there! It's a nice thing to do and for your surprise you will notice that very few tourist knows about it!

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  • Juliet's balcony & the lovers' terrace

    by Artex5 Written Aug 24, 2011

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    It's a wonderful place that transmitted its ancient emotions in a special way. It seems to live there the atmosphere and the passion of Romeo & Juliet. Its perhaps one of the most romantic places in the world. This place it's also a part of the setting of one of the most important Shakespeare' s play.
    Another interesting and curious thing to do here is to engrave your name on the Lovers' Terrace to be part forever of Verona history. It's particularly recommended for lovers and for others events like Valentine' s day.

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  • Shibiru's Profile Photo

    Casa di Giulietta (13th century)

    by Shibiru Written Sep 13, 2004

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    Love Notes!!!

    I turned the corner to her house and....wow...I was inffected by the love possion...hihi....really it's wonderfull!!!There are x notes of love...friends,partners,family,wishes...in all the languages u can imagine...with and without paintings...Even not having a partner, you feel the love and it's just so...I can't describe it, u have to feel it by yourself!
    You can also see Giuliettas' famous balcony, her statue(u have to touch her breasts to have luck in love) and u ca get into the house. There....hmmm...I wont tell u what u'll see there...'cause if I tell u everything u don't have to go there....just one thing, go outside and look down....to the tourists loking at the house....and imagine how it was centuries ago:-)

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Not Juliet-but today's lovely facsimile

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 2, 2008

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    The balcony-that is not Juliet hanging out
    2 more images

    This is THE tourist drop off to gawk at the balcony and the house. Made famous by Shakespeare story of lover unhappiness, he spoke to her on the balcony. So much graffitti and just grimey in the area, turned me off, as well s the number of people standing around, kind of wondering why am I here, maybe we should hang out a while. The home was built around 1300, and the balcony was added in 1936 in an effort to draw tourists to Verona. It is just off Piazza Erbe-south. Open 8:30-19:30 daily except Monday.

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  • susancallus's Profile Photo

    Balcone di Gulietta

    by susancallus Written Jun 16, 2006

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    Juliette's Balcony
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    So sweet and romantic place! To our surprise there was no big queue to go up to Juliette's balcony! So worth it! I think that not all the tourists knew that one can visit the balcony and take pictures on it with a small fee! :)) There is a small museum inside to visit as well with the same fee.

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  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Balcony of an 800 year old inn.

    by hundwalder Updated May 14, 2006

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    Romeo, wherefore art thou ?

    The city of Verona has many fascinating and unforgetable things to see. For this reason it is difficult to comprehend why this balcony of an 800 year old inn is the most popular tourist attraction in this great historic city. The balcony is a well preserved example of 13th. century Veneto architecture, but Verona has many such treasures. The wall you see in the photo at first glimpse appears to be covered with trash, which is very uncharacteristic of Europe. Upon closer examination you will notice that these thousands of bits of paper are actually love notes left by modern day Romeos and Giuliettas from around the globe. Large hearts are painted on the wall. Some messages are near the level of the balcony, which suggests superior climbing ability of many of the posters.

    So why is this well preserved medieval traveller's inn so pupular with tourists today ? The characteristic late Romanesque / early Gothic architecture of the inn, its courtyard, and its balcony, make an ideal setting for the balcony scene from Shakespear's tragedy. Following extensive restoration work it became known to the world as il casa di Giulietta Capuleti. Tourists are given pricey tours of the inn's interior on the premise that it was the home of the ill fated young lover. A bronze statue of the young maiden stands in the courtyard. The right breast glistens from being fondled by countless tourists.

    The courtyard is normally crowded. Luckily I arrived when the staff was getting ready to close the grounds, and most of the tourists had left.

    No charge for entering the courtyard and admiring the balcony and statue. Hefty charge for tour of the old hotel's interior and standing on it's artistic balcony.

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    Juliet's balcony

    by Polly74 Written Aug 4, 2004

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    Juliet's Balcony

    As you?ll probably know Shakespeare?s Romeo and Juliet?s love story takes place in Verona. This city is not only the perfect place for this story to take place for its middle age ambient, there are also some real references here. The house you?re seeing is the "real" home of Juliet?s family (the Capuleti). The building dates from the 13th century and during Christmas period there is a Xmas tree in the court where everybody put over it love messages written on pieces of paper

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  • Roggeveen's Profile Photo

    Only fools. . .

    by Roggeveen Written May 12, 2005

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    How can I find Romeo in this crowd?

    . . .fall in love like Romeo and Julia did in the heartbreaking story.

    . . .get up the balcony to have their picture taken.

    You will have noticed this was not my favourite attraction. It was terribly overcrowded. People put notes on the wall using chewing gum. Which in my opinion is not in the style of Shakespeare. And who will clean it all up?

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Casa di Giulietta

    by german_eagle Written Apr 12, 2003

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    Casa di Giulietta with the famous balcony

    This well preserved medieval house (built approx. 1300) became the place where Juliet (from unforgotten Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet) lived - but only in visitors fantasy. The setting of the original story was in Siena.

    However, it is a romantic place and not to miss when in Verona.

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  • Herkbert's Profile Photo

    Visit Casa Di Giulietta

    by Herkbert Written Jul 14, 2010

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    Is that Juliet on the balcony?
    2 more images

    Romeo, Romeo, where forth art thou Romeo?

    Probably third in line behind the American and French guys getting their picture taken rubbing the right breast of Juliet's statue. It is suppose to bring you luck and since she's bronze, she won't slap you.

    The legendary lovers famed balcony has become a must see stop for tourists visiting Verona. It doesn't matter if they were fictional characters and the balcony was built in the 1930's to provide photo seeking tourists with a photo op, it's fun to dream and imagine Juliet peering out from the balcony waiting for her lover to appear.

    Today, you can stop in the courtyard and see the statue, leave a love note and just give your own Juliet a little hug and kiss as the lovers would have done.

    Juliet's house houses a small museum and temporary art exhibitions. All the frescoes, paintings, and ceramics on display are genuine antiques from the 16th and 17th century, however, none of them have ever belonged to the Capulets.

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Juliet's house - outside: the gate

    by Mikebond Updated Oct 18, 2005

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    gate to Juliet's house
    1 more image

    This gate leads you to Juliet's house, a place that all tourists want to see. The plaque in the second pic, located just above the gate, says: "These were the houses of the Capulets, whence came that Juliet for whom gentle hearts cried so much and poets sang".
    As you can see, some stupid people have written even there!

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