Teatro Romano - Roman Theatre, Verona

4 out of 5 stars 15 Reviews

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  • Teatro Romano - Roman Theatre
    by croisbeauty
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    Teatro Romano
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  • Teatro Romano - Roman Theatre
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Teatro Romano

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 22, 2014

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    In addition to the Arena, the ancient Romans had a smaller theater on the other side of the river, with stone steps built into a hillside. This theater is also very well preserved and is used today for spoken drama – especially Shakespeare in both Italian and English – as well as jazz and ballet performances. These are sponsored by a notorious German automobile company that starts with a P and ends with an E. (Which is nice of them, but please don't buy their cars, okay?)

    Second photo: As in the Arena, the cheap seats in the Teatro Romano are unreserved and are on the bare stone steps, whereas the more expensive seats are numbered and have backrests. Prices vary according to the kind of show it is, but for a Shakespeare play you would pay EUR 26 for a numbered seat, or EUR 16 for an unreserved place on the stone steps.

    Third photo: The stage is of course not left over from the Romans, but it is in more or less the same position where the ancient stage was.

    Fourth photo: As at the Arena, they have a red carpet for the folks in the more expensive seats, but not for the rest of us.

    1. Teatro Romano 2. Seating at the Teatro Romano 3. Teatro Romano and modern stage 4. Red carpet for (some) spectators
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    Teatro Romano & San Pietro

    by globetrott Updated Nov 1, 2012

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    Teatro Romano & San Pietro and the area around of it is a great scenery, that you will see from Ponte Nuovo not very far from Piazza del Erbe. The hill at San Pietro had settlements already at Roman times and today it is mainly famous for a perfect place to see the panorama of Verona.
    The Roman theatre dates back to the old Roman empire and is unfortunately in a bad condition today.

    Teatro Romano & San Pietro
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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The Roman times of Verona - Teatro Romano

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 1, 2011

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    The Roman Theatre, which is superbly positioned on the banks of the river Adige, was built in the second half of the 1st century B.C. Successive constructions caused the theatre to disappeared. It was excavated from 1834 to 1914 under the archeologist Andrea Monga and were only finished comparatively recently.
    Above the last tier of seats to the left is a loggia with marble columns which once formed part of the theatre, though it seems unlikely that this was its original position.
    Inside of the complex there is a very old church of SS. Siro and Libera, which is now under reconstructions.

    Teatro Romano
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    The Roman Theatre and archeological museum

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Verona's Roman Theatre dates back to the 1st century B.C., which makes it even older than the Arena. It was discovered in the 19th century by Andrea Monga, a rich business man who had acquired some properties in the area and who ended up demolishing most of them to conduct archeological digs. The theatre measures 107 x 150 m and rises to a height of about 60 m. If the main scene could not be restored, the original marble floor of the orchestra can still be seen along with the semi-circular stone seats. Today, Verona's Roman Theatre is one of the city's most popular concert venues.

    From the theatre, there's a small elevator that takes visitors up to the archeological museum, which is set in the 15th century convent of San Gerolamo. Different items (mosaics, sculptures, coins, etc.) dating back to Roman times that were found all over the city of Verona are now on display in the museum. I must admit though that the view over the city and Adige River is so beautiful from up there, we probably spent more time looking outside than actually looking at the exhibition!

    Verona Card gives access to both the Roman Theatre and the archeological museum.

    Remains of the Roman Theatre in Verona Sylvain climbing up to the archeological museum The view from the convent of San Gerolamo Roman Theatre with a view of the city and river
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    Teatro Romano

    by Turska Written Sep 18, 2010

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    We actually came here for a mistake. We were looking for some other theatre, but the view from the top was so great, that it was worth it. Even though the theatre is not so different from many others we have seen. And the ugly brown plastic-chairs made it look less beautyful. I gues there was some kind of happening coming soo, and tht´s why they had those plastic-chairs. I didn´t actually even take a photo of the actual theatre because of them.

    But I think you should visit here only because of the view! And maybe the plastic-chairs aren´t allways there!

    View from the theatre. Cloister at the theatre (I understood it that way)
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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Teatro Romano

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 16, 2005

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    This Roman theatre was built in the last quarter of the 1st century BC, however, little remains of the stage area but the semicircular seating area which banks up onto the foot of the hill of San Pietro is largely intact. During the course of time, the theatre was buried under huts and debris until in 1830, Andrea Monga purchased the site, demolished the huts and recovered what we see today. Today, the theatre is used for staging various concerts. In fact they were setting the stage up for one whlist I was there.

    Open: 8.30am - 7.30pm Tue-Sun. 1.30pm-7.30pm Mon. Admission: € 3,00 (which also includes a visit to the Museo Archeologico further up the hill).

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    Roman theatre and Archaeology museum

    by Sjalen Written May 21, 2005

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    The Teatro Romano in Verona has undergone several restaurations throughout the centuries but also been neglected. This means that as far as Roman theatres go, this is not the most interesting (and just like with the Arena, it is sometimes used for performances and full of modern life). Having said that, it is definately worth visiting nevertheless as the adjoining archaeology museum (reached by stairs or lift) is good. It includes mosaics, Roman and even Etruscan finds and other things. Some of it displayed in a former monastery. Moreover, there are fantastic city views from the museum.

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  • Teatro Romano

    by Jetgirly Written Apr 9, 2005

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    Just on the other side of the River Adige is the Teatro Romano, the ruins of a small Roman theatre. It is also home to the Museum of Archaeology, and during the summer months ballets and plays are performed here. Allow yourself about two hours to explore the ruins and museum in their entirety... in my opinion, there is more to explore and discover here than at the Roman Ampitheatre in Piazza Bra!

    Looking Down on the Theatre
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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Roman Theatre

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 26, 2005

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    We didn't quite make it to the top of the hill - way too hot and we'd already done a lot of sightseeing and there was still the opera to look forward to that night. Instead we clambered up to the top of the old roman theatre - entrance is via the archaelogical museum. This was still a climb but the view was worth it. The roman theatre dates back to the 1st century BC and was first discovered in the 16h century beneath some civil and religious buildings. Recently opened to the public, on view now is only part of the original building. Small theatre productions take place here in this idyllic setting overlooking Verona's River Adige.

    teatro romano
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    The Roman Theatre

    by Rickman77 Written Feb 10, 2005

    The Roman Theatre is a beautiful open air theatre that is built into the hillside and over looks the river Adige and the city of Verona.

    It is a great place to catch a jazz concert. The natural acoustics, the lovely atomosphere, the beautiful scenery, and the fact that you are sitting on and in a theatre that was built 2000 years ago.

    Not only was it built over 2000 years ago but it was also buried underground for over 1000 years. The site was excavated in the 1800's by a man who believed that there were ruins below. He dug till he found them and revealed a marvelous theatre that is once again in use 2000 years after it was built.

    It's a great place to catch a concert, espeacially if you like jazz.

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    The Roman Theater

    by Polly74 Written Aug 4, 2004

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    The Roman Theater was build in the first century. In this semicircular Theater nowadays take place the Shakespeare Festivals. The Archeologist Andrea Monga began its restoration in the 19th century. The restoration took some time, because it wasn?t finished till recently.

    Not far from here there?s the Archeological Museum, where you?ll find some interesting Roman mosaics and sculptures.

    The roman theater inside

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  • lareina's Profile Photo

    Museo Archeologico e Teatro Romano

    by lareina Written May 10, 2004

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    Across the Ponte Pietra from central Verona, you will find the Roman Theatre and Archeological Museum. The theatre was built in the 1st Century AD and still hosts festivals and concerts. The museum contains a large collection of mosaics, bronzes, sculptures, glass vessels, fragments of stone carvings and columns, and other Greek and Roman artifacts. I especially enjoyed the mosaics and the couryard with the fragments of stone tablets.

    Bust in one of the rooms
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  • montezaro's Profile Photo

    Roman Theatre

    by montezaro Updated Apr 24, 2004

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    Roman Theatre was built in the second half of the 1st century B.C., however, it disappeared because of succesive constructions.
    Set against the green tufa hills, on the top of which is situated the Monastery of St. Jerome, the theatre looks very impressivly. At its eastern side there is the lovely ancient church of Saints Sirius and Libera, built in the 10th century.

    Roman Theatre
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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Roman theatre-more views

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    The ruins are one of the top 10 in Europe in my opinion. They have been excavated and the seats and stage, along with the houses and loggia are unbelievable in the richness of another era.

    Looking back into the city from seats loggia area with walkway View looking back to the house area Sculptures and archeological finds Our beatutiful pose
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  • chancay's Profile Photo

    The roman theatre

    by chancay Updated Jan 17, 2003

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    Probably it´s already reconstructed. Should be a wonderful place to see a drama or theatre act with the Adige river in the backfround.

    Roman theatre

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