Vicenza Off The Beaten Path

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    Oratorio dei Proti
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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Vicenza

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    Giardino Salvi

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 25, 2011

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    Giardino Salvi

    Giardino Salvi is small but beautiful city park, right next to the medieval walls and Piazza di Castello. It was erected in 1592 by Luigi Valmarana, who at the same time commissioned construction of an Loggia inside the park, known as Loggia Valmarana. The loggia was constructed in a shape of an temple, right on the River Seriola, and served for the meetings of intelectuals.
    In the 18th century the park was transformed in an ebglish styled park. Nowadays it is used for the Christmas fair and sales.

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    Monte Berico

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 3, 2011

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    Monte Berico
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    The legend says Virgin appeared to announce that Vicenza would be spared during a plaque in first half of the 15th century.
    Three wide symmetrical staircases lead up to the church which, majestic in its huge size and nunerous statues, lifts high over its three facades, like a crown, an airy dome which gives a distinct gracefulness to the building as a whole.

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    Monte Berico

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 3, 2011

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    Monte Berico
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    The 17th century church is work of Vicentine architect Carlo Borella, begun in 1688 and finished in 1703. The work begun at the wish of the city of Vicenza as a symbol and an expression of the continued bond of faith between the city and the Madonna.
    The exterior's architecture is repeated exactly of three sides of the Sanctuary, the east, the north and the west.
    The originals of the basilica are tied to two apparitions of the Blessed Virgin which occured on this hill: the first one on March 7, 1426, the second one on August 1, 1428.

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    Monte Berico

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 3, 2011

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    Monte Berico
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    The Gothic church on the western side of the complex (see right on the picture) was built in 1428 with the trong support of the local population, convinced they would be miraculously freed of the plague which raged almost a quarter of a century.
    The present facade is not the original, an extensive renovation in 1860 has given its appearance a heavier aspect.
    This is western side of the Sanctuary with a small 15th century Gothic styled church.

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    Monte Berico

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 3, 2011

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    The stairway of the sanctuary
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    The Shrine of Our Lady of Monte Berico stands with its distinctive outline at the summitof the hill which overlooks the city of Vicenza.
    If you wish to go on foot, it's only a short walk from the town centre, durring which you can enjoy the view of the city. The walkway starts by "scalette", a pitoresque stairway of 192 steps which begins at Piazza Fraccon with the Triumphal Arch attributed to the architect Palladio. This exeptional work was designed and built by Francesco Muttoni, started March 7, 1746.
    Its total length is 700 meters consisting of 150 arches, grouped by tens, and each group is divided by a samll landing in a form of chapel to symbolize the 15 mysteries and the 150 Hail Maries in the rosary.

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    Death of Magellan, by Pigafetta

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 3, 2010

    See general tips about Pigafetta's house in Vicenza.
    Our only immediate knowledge of Magellan's journey comes from the diary of the Italian Antonio Pigafetta. Antonio was not a member of the crew but an adventurous tourist who volunteered as historian for the voyage. In the following excerpt Antonio describes the death of Magellan on an island of the Philippines.
    Searching for a way to control the native population after he leaves the island, Magellan persuades one of the local chiefs to convert to Christianity (referred to by Antonio as the "Christian King"). Magellan hopes to make this chieftain supreme over the remaining local tribes and loyal to the King of Spain. To bolster this chief's local supremacy, Magellan decides that a show of force, particularly the power of his muskets and cannon, against a neighboring tribe will impress the natives into submission.
    Magellan orders an attack but miscalculates. He does not take into account that the reefs along the island's beach will not allow his ships to get into effective range for their cannon. As the battle is joined along the beach, the Spanish fire their muskets ineffectively from too far a distance despite Magellan's attempt to order his crew to cease-fire. Emboldened, the natives rush into the water flinging spears at the unprotected legs and feet of the Spanish. The crew abandons Magellan in panic and the Captain is soon overwhelmed:
    "When morning came, forty-nine of us leaped into the water up to our thighs, and walked through water for more than two cross-bow flights before we could reach the shore. The boats could not approach nearer because of certain rocks in the water. The other eleven men remained behind to guard the boats. When we reached land, those men had formed in three divisions to the number of more than one thousand five hundred persons. When they saw us, they charged down upon us with exceeding loud cries, two divisions on our flanks and the other on our front.
    When the captain saw that, he formed us into two divisions, and thus did we begin to fight. The musketeers and crossbow-men shot from a distance for about a half-hour, but uselessly; for the shots only passed through the shields which were made of thin wood and the arms [of the bearers]. The captain cried to them, "Cease firing cease firing!" but his order was not at all heeded. When the natives saw that we were shooting our muskets to no purpose, crying out they determined to stand firm, but they redoubled their shouts. When our muskets were discharged, the natives would never stand still, but leaped hither and thither, covering themselves with their shields. They shot so many arrows at us and hurled so many bamboo spears (some of them tipped with iron) at the captain-general, besides pointed stakes hardened with fire, stones, and mud, that we could scarcely defend ourselves.
    Seeing that, the captain-general sent some men to burn their houses in order to terrify them. When they saw their houses burning, they were roused to greater fury. Two of our men were killed near the houses, while we burned twenty or thirty houses. So many of them charged down upon us that they shot the captain through the right leg with a poisoned arrow. On that account, he ordered us to retire slowly, but the men took to fight, except six or eight of us who remained with the captain.
    The natives shot only at our legs, for the latter were bare; and so many were the spears and stones that they hurled at us, that we could offer no resistance. The mortars in the boats could not aid us as they were too far away.
    So we continued to retire for more than a good crossbow flight from the shore always fighting up to our knees in the water. The natives continued to pursue us, and picking up the same spear four or six times, hurled it at us again and again. Recognizing the captain, so many turned upon him that they knocked his helmet off his head twice, but he always stood firmly like a good knight, together with some others. Thus did we fight for more than one hour, refusing to retire farther. An Indian hurled a bamboo spear into the captain's face, but the latter immediately killed him with his lance, which he left in the Indian's body. Then, trying to lay hand on sword, he could draw it out but halfway, because he had been wounded in the arm with a bamboo spear. When the natives saw that, they all hurled themselves upon him. One of them wounded him on the left leg with a large cutlass, which resembles a scimitar, only being larger. That caused the captain to fall face downward, when immediately they rushed upon him with iron and bamboo spears and with their cutlasses, until they killed our mirror, our light, our comfort, and our true guide. When they wounded him, he turned back many times to see whether we were all in the boats. Thereupon, beholding him dead, we, wounded, retreated, as best we could, to the boats, which were already pulling off."

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    Lake Garda-Lazise

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 8, 2008

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    Entry
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    This is an absolutely lovely town for the solitude of it all. Nearby is GArdaland, which we did not go to; mostly for children & parents. It has only 6,200 residents, and the town holds a lot of peaceful scenes. It was a major trade port on the lake. It was from the time of BC that it originated, and was a key stronghold for defending the area by many rulers. That is why the town is surrounded by walls, It has three port entries. Lazise means "place on the lake". The castle was built in the 9th century to protect against the Hungarian invasions. Later occupied by Germans, and in the 13th century the Scaligeri family put up the city walls. In 1405, the town went under Venizian rule until Napoleon came along, and after that defeat, the town went overt to the Austrians. In 1866, with the new democracy, it went to Italy control.
    The castle has 5 towers, but is not for touring. There are outer and inner walls and it is real neat walking into what is finally the main core.

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    Lake Garda-Sirimione town views

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 8, 2008

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    Main square
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    These are some typical views of the castle and the water side. People could be horrific in the summer. The whole peninsula brings them to the point and nowhere to turn but go back. The town is not big enough to hold all that show up, let alone parking. WE parked for 1.80 Euro an ora, and that is normal price within 3-4 blocks of entering old town area.

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    Lake Garda-Sirimione castle

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 8, 2008

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    The castle was built in late 1200's by the Scaligeri family, probably directed by Mostino I. It was previously a fortress where the Romans controlled the area for 1,000 years, with interludes of losing the territory to Lombards and other attackers of the empire. The castle held the fleet of warships of the family that controlled the region. The views are great inside and around the castle, although there is not much to see inside. It is a shell with no tourist things to see. YOu can walk 150 steps to the top of the ramparts to take in the views.
    Open 9-12 15-17 daily except Monday. Cost is 3 Euro

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    Lake Garda-Sirimione

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2008

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    Walkway along the lake
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    This peninsula is from the 5th century BC and was a popular resort for wealthy families form Verona in early BC. It became a Roman town and then fortified to protect the southern region of the lake. In the 13th century it was under the rule of the Scaligeri family which built the castle in 1308-29 on the foundations of old Roman castles. It was a military center point until the 16th century, In 1405, Venice took control and held until 1797, when Austria got control of the province. IN 1860 it went under Italy rule with the new democracy.
    The castle has tours, and it is a wonderful castle on the outside, well preserved and surrounded by a moat. It is one of the best preserved castles in Europe. The inside does not hold much more than an empty shell, but the views are great. In the rear is a harbor that used to allow boats to enter the castle from water side. Closed Mondays and times are 9-12 and 14-17.

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    Marostica

    by BruceDunning Updated May 25, 2008

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    Information of the town
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    There are two castellos in the town of 13,000. The one at top of the hill is Castello Superiore, and one at bottom Castello Inferiore. The latter was built in 1312 by Della Scalla family form Verona. In time it transferred ownership to the Scalgeri family that enhanced the fortress. This town was a focal point for many battles and under Verona control for most of the time.
    The game of chess using humans is the vogue thing to see in September on every even year. They dress in costumes of the medieval period and actually maneuver in position on the chess board as moves are made.

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    Bassano del Grappo

    by BruceDunning Updated May 25, 2008

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    Locator map of sites to seee
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    Italian named Bassano, the town has a population of 40,000, but explodes with locals most weekends and tourists also in summers. Founded in 2nd century BCE by a Roman called Bassianus, and was an agricultural estate. The medieval town was dating back to 998 and the castle is first noted as being built 1150. It struggled through takeover by the Lombards, Ventians, Austrian and then got into the war for independence/democracy in 1800's.
    There are three main squares: Monte Vecchio, Liberta, and Garabaldi(melds with Liberta). The town is split by Rivera Brenta, a major flowing river. The right bank has the shops and retail for tourists. The left bank is more for the locals and the castello is at the top of the crest.
    Park close to the information center and walk in using the Via J .Ponte. It leads to all the sites, and ends toward the Ponte Vecchio(bridge).

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    BAssano del Grappo streets

    by BruceDunning Updated May 20, 2008

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    Layout of the town
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    End to end the walk form information center to the bridge is no more than 10 minutes, but take a slow pace and enjoy the structures on each side of the streets. Many palazzi are noted along the way. Piazza GArabaldi combined with Liberta is a larger square where you can just relax.
    Castello Ezzinin is worth the walk to get there. Once there, do not get too disappointed. Only can walk into the first level and then only briefly,; or at least for us. The cost is 2 Euro.

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    Bassano Ponte Vecchio-Wood

    by BruceDunning Updated May 20, 2008

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    TAking in the structure viewing
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    The bridge is actually a site to see. It was built in 1209m and burned three times and rebuilt. In 1524, it was built in concrete and did not last more than 3 years-who knows why? The bridge was destroyed in WWI and again rebuilt. The issue for the bridge is many other people also are standing on the bridge for the same reason. It is crowded, I am sure especially in summer tourists season.
    Museo Ponte degli Alpina Howis in a bar/restaurante downstairs. It does have some artifacts and alpine flavor, but was a surprise as to its location. It is very small, and good it is free to enter through the restaurant. Grapperia Nardini is on the right bank, and also not much to see.
    However, a lot of Italiano locals do come to BAssano on weekends to enjoy the splendor of it all. The streets get very crowded if you do not get there early.

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    Soave-Pallazzi

    by BruceDunning Updated May 20, 2008

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    Bio of palace Capitano
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    The facades are great to look at, but they are considered nort palaces anymore. None of the three main palazzi have any daily activity of home life. Palazzo CAvalli is closed and boarded up on the second floor windows, and generally run down looking. Palazzo Guistiza is a converted restaurante at the main level and the top floors are private. The Palazzo CApitano is a totally renovated building now housing the administrative offices and municipal activities of the city. I was disappointed not being able to view restored palaces inside and out.

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