Local traditions and culture in Jersey

  • THE FAMOUS A POUND BANK NOTE...
    THE FAMOUS A POUND BANK NOTE...
    by eden_teuling
  • Harvest of the Sea
    Harvest of the Sea
    by Jasen71
  • PAINTING LILLIE LANGTRY
    PAINTING LILLIE LANGTRY
    by eden_teuling

Most Viewed Local Customs in Jersey

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    THE FAMOUS 1 POUND NOTE OF JERSEY!!

    by eden_teuling Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Brittons never ever had one, I mean a 1 pound bank note.......so in Jersey they are very proud having one!

    In the UK there is only a 1 pound COIN.

    Here you see a photo of a one pound banknote, which Leo (Globerover) was so kind as to send me after having read and kindly commented on my Jersey page.

    He is right: now it is complete!!

    Vielen Dank, Leo !

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    Currency

    by jo104 Written Mar 25, 2008

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    Most people know that Jersey is free from UK taxes so things can be be more affordable as there is no 15% vat element to pay. The Island has many wealthy patrons living here, my travel guide said that newcomers to the Island are closely vetted although this info may be outdated.

    Jersey has its own currency even though all places accept UK sterling you may be given change in Jersey pounds, these notes will not be accepted in the uk. You can change your Jersey notes at the postal exchange at the airport but they will only offer exchange for GBP5 and over. They still use the one pound note so your wallet may feel fatter then usual. Many places will be able to give you back UK sterling notes if you ask them.

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    Harvest of the Sea

    by Jasen71 Written Nov 26, 2005

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    In the fall the Jersey farmers collect seaweed from the high water mark to use on the land as fertiliser. The seaweed rots into the earth, and is then ploughed in. They say it gives the unique Jersey Royal New potatoes its favour!.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Abalone, Awabi or Ormer

    by Jasen71 Written Jul 21, 2005

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    Here in Jersey we call them ormers and know full well that these much sought-after shellfish are one of the finest culinary treats the seas have to offer. During the months with an R in them, and inconveniently only on a very low tide can one find the Ormer.

    Catching them with diving gear of any sort is prohibited, so ormering involves a long trek down the shore, a scramble over weed-covered reefs and a careful search of every nook and cranny where your quarry might be lurking.

    The search also involves turning over a great many rocks - which should of course be turned back to protect the many unwanted creatures which also seek refuge beneath them.

    In spite of cold water, cold winds, scratched and bruised hands and sometimes meagre returns, many Islanders go ormering for pleasure as well as to search for a feed. If, however, the pastime were a feature of penal servitude with hard labour, it could be classified as a harsh and cruel punishment.

    There has been rumours of chinese or japanese blackmarket in these ormers leading to illegal diving and selling of the ormer.

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    Jersey Pullover ' The Jersey'

    by Jasen71 Written Jul 21, 2005

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    When I have travelled far and wide, and I mention that I am from Jersey... People often link the name to the Cow, New Jersey or even the Jumper/Pullover.
    Jersey has been associated with knitting for nearly 400 years. In the 16th century many articles of knitted apparel were exported from Jersey to England and France. The principle knitted articles of this time were stockings and men's waistcoats.
    Although Island farmers no longer rear sheep for wool, the traditional fisherman's 'Jersey' is still manufactured.
    The Jersey is normally coloured Blue, but the people of St Ouen prefer to have a natural Grey, hence thay are called 'Grey Bellies'.

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    The Branchage

    by Jasen71 Written Jul 21, 2005

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    This is where an ancient Island tradition, the branchage, enters the picture.

    At its best, this twice-yearly operation involves the careful trimming back of luxuriant late spring and summertime growth to leave roadside margins looking smooth and manicured.

    As well as preventing foliage from spilling over into public thoroughfares, the branchage makes junctions safer by clearing the view of drivers pausing at yellow lines or turning off major roads into minor ones.
    Later In the summer months of July or September is likely to see an earnest group of men in each parish solemnly measuring the height from the ground of any overhanging branches. The group consists of the Parish Constable, Centeniers, Vingteniers, Road's Committee and Road Inspectors and they will be checking to see that no branch is nearer a footpath than eight feet (2.4 m) and no nearer a road than 12 feet (3.6 m). This bi-annual inspection is called 'visites du branchage' and anyone found not having cut branches on their property to the correct height used to be fined 50p.

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    Jersey a Police State

    by Jasen71 Written Jul 21, 2005

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    There are 13 Police forces in Jersey! 12 local forces have power within their own areas (parish) and one paid federal uniformed 'States of Jersey' Police Force. The Honorary Police Force have, for centuries, been elected by parishioners to assist the Connétable (Mayor) of the Parish to maintain law and order. Officers are elected as Centeniers(inspectors), Vingteniers(sargents) or Constable's Officers each with various duties and responsibilities. The Honorary Police had provided the only law enforcement prior to the appointment of paid Police officers, first for the Parish of St Helier in 1853 and later to serve the whole Island. However, the Honorary Police still provide an essential and very valuable service to the Parish and community in which they live. The Honorary Police have no uniform and sometimes all they wear is a metal lapel badge!!!

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    A Jersey Crapaud

    by Tea4Two Written May 29, 2003

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    Jersey people are sometimes referred to as 'crapauds' (toads) by residents of our sister island, Guernsey. How did we get this less than flattering name? The legend goes like this:

    When St. Patrick arrived in Jersey he was unfortunately pelted with stones and insulted. On his arrival in our smaller, sister island of Guernsey, however, he received a very warm welcome from its in habitants. He liked Guernsey very much and decided he would lay claim to it. St. George was also in Guernsey at the time, and he, too had decided to lay claim to the island. Rather than argue the wise saints decided that neither would have it, but before they left they would bestow gifts on the hospitable islanders.

    St. George was standing by a small stream and he decided to bless the waters of the stream so that they had the power to heal.

    St. Patrick gathered all the nasty creatures that inhabited Guernsey at the time and promptly went back to Jersey and deposited them all there. From then on Guernsey would be free of everything nasty and Jersey would have more than its fair share of snakes and toads.

    I suppose if we were rude to a Saint all those years ago then we deserve our unflattering name. There is, however, a gentle rivalry between Jersey and Guernsey and we tend to get our own back by calling Guernsey people 'ane' (donkey), a reflection, I am told, of their innate laziness.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Getting Married in Jersey!

    by Tea4Two Written May 28, 2003

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    The changes in the island’s marriage laws mean that it is much easier for couples to marry in Jersey. Wedding applications can be made by post and once the paperwork is completed you need only to arrive three working days before the planned wedding date to complete formalities and collect the marriage licence.

    Even if you arrive without having made a postal application you can get married just ten days after presenting all your documentation to the Superintendent Registrar.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Family Travel
    • Luxury Travel

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    MARKET PLACES IN JERSEY.....

    by eden_teuling Written Apr 4, 2003

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    In the colourful stands on central market in St. Helier one can find all products grown in Jersey itself.

    The graceful, decorative Marketbuilding you can find at the crossroads Beresford straat and Halkett Place.

    The roof is made of glass which roof is supported by colourfully decorated iron pilars (cast iron) and in the centre is a wonderful fountain with lots of plants around it: a most lovely place for plants....

    There is also a pond with goldfish.

    Nearby in Berefordstraat one can admire all sea fruit that has just brought in by the fishermen, which for me is always attractive for photographs....

    Such a market place I also found in DRESDEN (GERMANY) and in LILLE (FRANCE).....see my pages, if you feel like it!!
    I would be pleased.....

    Lots of wonderful TRAVELOGUES, ONCE THE VERY HEART OF VT PAGES......

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    HISTORY BROUGHT TO LIFE AGAIN....

    by eden_teuling Written Apr 4, 2003

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    In several places of Jersey History is brought back to life by " plays" in costumes of the time, with weaponry dating from that same time and it is great to watch one of more of these events.

    I can recommend it to you and.....Jersey being only 4 x 18 sq.kms. everything is so easily reached......

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    EMILIE CHARLOTTE LANGTRY....

    by eden_teuling Written Apr 4, 2003

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    She lived from 1853 - 1929.

    She was an English actress, known as "JERSEY LILY" and was famous for her beauty.

    Perhaps it is my imagination, but she looks like DIANA, THE PRINCESS OF WALES but with a darker complexion and dark hair.
    She was a beauty too, wasn't she?

    This Lillie from Wales befriended the Prince of Wales, later Edward VII.

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    THE HERMITAGE.....

    by eden_teuling Written Apr 2, 2003

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    On top of a high rocj near E,izabeth Castle in St. Aubin's Bay near St. Helier is a small chapel.
    It is an ORATORIUM, dating back to the 12th Century.
    It is called after the holy man who once lived there and the City St. Helier got the same name.

    It is said that the man came from Belgium in 538 after the Island had become Catholic and he lived there on that rock as a HERMIT .

    In 555 he died too young, by the hands of pirates who used axes for their evil work!

    Each Summer a pligrimage is held to this place on the first Sunday before or achter 16th July or on St. Helier's Day itself.

    The 2 crossed axes in Jersey"s Coat of Arms remind us of this Saint.

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    ISN'T THIS SWEET???

    by eden_teuling Written Apr 1, 2003

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    For over 200 years this beautiful and friendly (not to forget curious !) animal delivers her share of the products on the island.

    All through the year the ROYAL JERSEY AGRICULTURAL and HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY organizes cattle exhibitions.

    The 1st one takes place in May in TRINITY.

    The highlight you must see is the life size bronze group of statues in St. Helier.....
    This year (2003) the 52nd anniversay of the World Jersey Cattle Bureau will be celebrated

    BTW 2001 was the Year of the Jersey Cow....

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