Grutas Things to Do

  • EMBLEM  OF  SOVIET  LITHUANIAN  REPUBLIC
    EMBLEM OF SOVIET LITHUANIAN REPUBLIC
    by matcrazy1
  • RED  FLAGS  AND  LENIN
    RED FLAGS AND LENIN
    by matcrazy1
  • V. LENIN  STREET  IN  RUSSIAN
    V. LENIN STREET IN RUSSIAN
    by matcrazy1

Most Recent Things to Do in Grutas

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    Small museum of Soviet stuff

    by Raimix Updated Dec 16, 2008

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    Newspaper about Lenin statue in Vilnius
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    In this museum I got opportunity to see such Soviet stuff as banknotes of roubles with heads of Lenin, the various medals (of being very good worker (proletarian) or very good fire-fighter or soldier). I believe and I have heard that people wanted to get some extra money for their work instead of getting one more medal :)

    Museum consisted of information about voting in Soviet Union, where people were very active in participation and have voted mostly for one party. I have seen some other interesting stuff (let say, scrap from newspapers about Soviet Union) that helped both to see the reality of past and to prove my knowledge I have got from people, who lived more years in Soviet Union than me.

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    Sculptures at Grutas park

    by Raimix Updated Dec 16, 2008

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    Lenin
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    The main exposition of Grutas park is, of course, Soviet sculptures. It consists of sculptures of such famous people as Lenin, Stalin, Marx, but also there are sculptures of people, who helped for soviet propaganda, actions of sending people to Siberia and so on in occupied Lithuania (let say, Antanas Snieckus). What is more, there are lot of sculptures for Soviet Red Army and generals of army, for victory against Natzist Germany.

    When watching these sculptures I found very common thing in some of them - action and mimics of people in sculptures "were telling" such phrases as "we will make it", "we will win", "we are strong".

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    Grutas park picture gallery

    by Raimix Updated Jun 13, 2007

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    Bzeznev pivture in front
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    Soviet pictures, as I have seen in that gallery, were based on putting here Stalin, Lenin, Marx ... and of showing promotion of Soviet Union - new factories appearing, people working in fields and more.

    I have found very strange thing in pictures - Lenin was showed standing in Lithuania' territory (let say, in Vilnius, near St. Ann church). I really believe that it is not true, as Lenin never been to Lithuania.

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    Example of soviet library

    by Raimix Updated Jun 13, 2007

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    Girl in Soviet style in library
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    At Soviet style library it could be possible to see what kind of books people were "allowed" to read that time. Most of them is associated with communism ideology (Karl Marx) and books how Russian soldiers were good at Second World War. When I was smaller I have read one book about Red Army as well, and for me it looked quite "hollywoodic" - some heroes have killed all army of enemies :)

    What is more, library has some advertisements (propaganda) to vote for one party and Lithuania' actions against it (let say, cartoon of Stalin with words: "Lithuanian's, don't vote for pig Stalin").

    In second picture we see words in Lithuanian language. Translation is: "Stalin the Great - the lighthouse of communism".

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    Resistance against Soviet rules

    by matcrazy1 Updated Jan 11, 2007

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    STALIN - COW

    There is the part of the Grutas Park Museum devoted to resistance against Soviet authorities and esp. anti-Soviet partisans who fighted till 1953. I wrote a lot of interesting info (in English) and I saw many documents and pictures - including this one of Stalin-cow which announced anti-soviet proclamation of Pasvalys district youth organisation "Viltis" (Hope) in 1946.


    REFLECTION
    My reflection was serious and somewhat sad. Where was democratic western Europe and its great politicians in times when one part of Europe (Western) enjoyed victory over Nazism, then fast rebuilding process, unbelievable growth and prosperity while the second largest part of Europe suffered from slavish Soviet system, stagnation, poverty. Add millions of deportees, killed, died in Soviet concentration camps etc., etc. Didn't they know the truth? Unbelievable!

    Or maybe it was much more comfortable to "believe" in Soviet liars on great Soviet state of ever lasting happiness, free elections in Poland, Czech, Lithuania etc. etc. and do nothing except some very cautious words of some doubts? At least the 2 top world's politicians (Churchill and Roosvelt) agreed to sell over half of Europe to the Soviet Union for almost 50 years... Hmm... in my times of 70' and 80' till the times of US president Raegan many western top politicians in real supported crimes of the Soviet Union... they were talking about so called "peaceful coexistence" with the Soviet Union (hmm... with criminal, slave system?). OK, errare humanum est... Hopefully they are not going to suggest "peaceful coexistence" with terrorists and states which support terrorists now?

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    The farse of Soviet elections

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 22, 2006

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    BY LITHUANIAN PARTISANS AGAINST SOVIET ELECTIONS

    There is a part of the Grutas Park Museum which discloses the farse of Soviet elections. I was standing there long time reading (in English) a lot of very interesting information on the subcject and Lithuanian Partisans' Actions against Soviet elections - look at the picture shared by them that time.

    I can't forget so called "elections" (to Polish parliament and to local authorities) in my country in 70' and 80' with over 98% of votes for communists and very high voter turnout (over 95%). There were no other candidates but communist till great election on 4th July 1989 (my first!) when "only" 35% of places in parliament were reserved for communists the rest was chosen really free, for the first time for over 50 years. Despite huge propaganda of almost 100% communist mass media, people didn't vote for any (even 1) communist haha - the first non-communist parliament in Eastern Europe was chosen that day. The first non-communist government was chosen by that parliament 3 months later... Changes started... :-)))

    Despite huge communist propaganda, many Poles didn't go to vote in elections at the end of 80'. Never mind, voter turnout had to be over 95% or so and surely it was!

    Simply: all elections under Soviet occupation organized by the Communist Party were illegal, antidemocratic, fictitious, forced and criminal in their character. In Lithuania, people agitating to vote against or not voting for communist at all, were regarded as enemies of the Soviet system. They sustained or could sustain repressions. Just one example from my brother's life (in Poland): in late 80' students of law who didn't come to vote (majority!) were interviewed by University authorities why and they were forced to show justification of their "wrong", anti-state behaviour. Communist authorities refused to give a passport to some of them, or later they didn't give them a permission to become prosecutors or judges as they had "wrong" outlook on life.

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    Wall of heroes or criminals?

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 22, 2006

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    WALL  OF  PAST  HEROES  AND  CRIMINALS  NOW

    One wall of the Grutas Park Museum is covered by copies of newspapers from the Soviet era especially devoted to "heroes" of that time. It seems that most (all?) of them were criminals in fact, many resposible less or more for the crime of genocide. Loong list of names...

    There were many slogans of communist propaganda put there as well. I didn't know Lithuanian language but some were in Russian; just one example: Let's Live The Great Party of Bolsheviks, Lenin and Stalin - trained itself to fight, avant-garde of the Soviet nation, creators and organizers of our victories!

    I paid attention to the fact that the Soviet Union - state of over hundred nationalities, including Lithuanians, wanted to create one nationality - Soviet nationality. Lithuanians, like many other nationalities in the USSR, actively needed to be Lithuanians in order not to become "Soviets". It's the difference with, say, Poland (formally independent state, although ruled by Soviets in fact from 1945 till 1989). In contrast to Lithuania the Polish nature of Poland was never in danger.

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    LTSR and... writers under Soviet rule

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 22, 2006

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    EMBLEM  OF  SOVIET  LITHUANIAN  REPUBLIC

    Lithuania was incorporated or better to say simply occupied by the Soviet Union since 1944 till 1991. It formed seperate republic called Lithuanian Socialist, Soviet Republic (LTSR). Keep in mind that part of traditional Lithuania was incorporated to... Belarusian Republic and is a part of Belarus now.
    I could see the emblem of LTSR in the Grutas Park Museum in various forms including the stained-glass on my picture.

    There is a seperate part of the exhibition regarded to the situation of writers in LTSR. The majority of writers had to become members of so called Writers' Association which was fully controlled by the Communist Party. No-one could publish any work without an approval of the Writers' Association, Glavlit and the Party Institutions. The soviet Union and its "alliens" including my country, Poland (over half of our globe till 90' of 20th century) were countries of total preventive censorship. Parts of the works to be revised used to be pointed out, and the "unnecessary" or "incorect" ones were simply taken out. The majority of books published during the post-war period and afterwards was adapted. Well, there were "black" lists of books, movies and lists of authors which never could be published (including Nobel prize winners in literature).

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    Matt-kiddy in the Soviet Union

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 22, 2006

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    OLD  FILM  PROJECTOR

    There is this old film projector, on my picture, put in front of a wall screen in the Grutas Park Museum. It was used to show numerous propaganda movies produced during Soviet era. Well, I remeber some of them from my kiddy years and I never liked them...


    MATT-KIDDY IN THE SOVIET UNION
    Well, the propaganda movie room in Grutas Park reminded me times when I was in Kiev, Ukraine (the Soviet Union that time) in 70' as a 12yo kid. We stayed far away from a city, in the middle of nowhere, in large, fenced area called international youth camp or something like this.

    I remember that there was huge, monumental building which housed the cinema (movie) where they showed us kids exclusively... Soviet propaganda movies, esp. on WWII. I remember enthusiasthic reaction of Soviet (well, Russian or Ukrainian) kids whenever Soviet soldiers killed Germans (every 2-5 min.) - the kids and their teachers cried hurraaa... It was very, very strange for us, Polish kids. We laughed at them but our teachers strongly forbade us to laugh at local kids.

    We didn't want to go to this cinema but at first camp's authorities forced us to do it everyday. Then, when our teachers (hmm... they, adults, dislike those propaganda movies even more) asked camp authorities to let us more free time and the managers agreed.

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    Soviet occupation of Lithuania

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 22, 2006

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    ABOUT  SOVIET  OCCUPATION  OF  LITHUANIA

    The Museum of the Grutas Park consists of a few parts. This corner, on my picture is about the beginning of Soviet occupation of Lithuania in 1939 - there are some very interesting maps, info and pictures displayed there.
    The most important feature of the museum and its displays is the fact that all explanations are written in 3 languages: Lithuanian, English and Russia.

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    Two-languages in Soviet Lithuania

    by matcrazy1 Updated Jan 8, 2005

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    SOVIET-LITHUANIAN  MAIL-BOX

    There is this mail-box, on my picture, put by the entrance to the Soviet picture gallery in Grutas Park. I was a little bit surpriced that it was blue (navy-blue) instead of to be red like most Soviet items.

    There was written "Pastas" in Lithuanian and "Potchta" in Russian language. Keep in mind that, most names (in public, like street names, names of various institutions, organisations etc.) had to be written in these two languages in Lithuanian Soviet republic, never mind how small was Russian minority.

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    Soviet picture gallery

    by matcrazy1 Updated Jan 8, 2005

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    SOVIET  PICTURE  GALLERY  -  ENTRANCE

    There is seperate wooden house which houses Soviet picture gallery (Sovietines Dailes Galerija) in Grutas Park. There are numerous propaganda pictures from the Soviet era.

    I remember similar pictures (few) from my country, Poland in 70' and 80'. They were sometimes put in some state offices, schools and especially in communist party headquarters. I think they were more numerous in the former Soviet Union including Lithuania.

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    Soviet banners and flags

    by matcrazy1 Updated Jan 8, 2005

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    SOVIET  BANNER

    There are numerous propaganda banners and flags, from the Soviet era, displayed in the Grutas Park Museum. Among them, this one on my picture. Red colour dominated there.

    Each communist (there weren't others) organisation had to posess its logo and flag/banner. Each state-owned (there weren't others) company/factory, each communist (there weren't others) party organisation, each school etc. had its own flag/banner. They were used at least during communist parades on 1 May or 7 October.

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    Soviet posters for 7 October

    by matcrazy1 Updated Jan 8, 2005

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    SOVIET POSTERS FOR 7 OCTOBER

    There are numerous propaganda posters, from the Soviet era, displayed in the Grutas Park Museum. Among them, a few devoted to the holiday of 7 October.

    7 October was celebrated as anniversary of bolshevik revolution 1917 in the Soviet Union and its "allies". In Poland, it wasn't a public holiday, though. There were massive parades (including huge military parade in the Red Square in Moscow) in all Soviet cities and towns. In Poland, not that much celebrations... but always state-owned (there weren't any other) mass media were full of information on that "event".

    And surely there were a lot of slogans like on those posters: we, loyal to workers' traditions (poster on the left) or 7th October - birthday of the USSR.

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    Soviet posters for 1 May

    by matcrazy1 Updated Jan 8, 2005

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    SOVIET  POSTERS  FOR  1  MAY

    There are numerous propaganda posters, from the Soviet era, displayed in the Grutas Park Museum. Among them, a few devoted to the holiday of 1 May.

    There was wtitten in Russian (poster on the left): 1 May - Day Of International Solidarity Of Workers. I remember millions of similar posters from my country, Poland in 70' and 80'. Hmm... many Polish workers immigrated to the West that time. Those white doves symbolized so called "peace" (doves of peace) in... the least peaceful state I ever knew. Hmm... no words... Soviet propaganda was cynical and full of blatant lies.

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