Valletta Local Customs

  • Valletta Balconies
    Valletta Balconies
    by balhannah
  • Valletta Balconies
    Valletta Balconies
    by balhannah
  • Valletta Balconies
    Valletta Balconies
    by balhannah

Best Rated Local Customs in Valletta

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    Karozzin

    by SanguiniA Written Jan 29, 2006

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    Karozzin

    Well, riding on a karozzin is surely a traditional thing to do ... but it is a bit overpriced in my opinion and Valletta is small enough to explore on foot anyway. The horses are sometimes ill-treated too, poor things are left in the sun all day long in summer.

    But anyway, it is in the Maltese tradition - and at least watching out for and getting a pic of a karozzin is worthwhile.

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    Balconies

    by SanguiniA Updated Jan 29, 2006

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    Traditional Maltese Balconies
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    Another traditional thing to look out for are the traditional Maltese balconies ... there are lots of them around in Valletta. Some of them are nice, but some, like the one in the second picture ... well ... are left to suffer like the state of the roads :-) Nevertheless, old or crumbling they are still quite charming.

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    Statues

    by SanguiniA Written May 13, 2006

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    Statue

    In the olden times, there was a curious law that stated that anyone who possessed a residence in the corner of the street had to adorn it with a religious statue or small shrine. These can still be seen nowadays, and are a constant reminder of how deeply religious the maltese people are (or at least were!)

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    Door Knockers

    by SanguiniA Written Jan 29, 2006

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    Valletta is the place where to look for traditional little things, such as door knockers - there are many different ones around, and they are used in a way to make the doors unique. Here is one that caught my eye ....

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    CARNIVAL TIME

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 7, 2010

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    February is carnival month in Malta. Beautiful coloured floats and equally colourful people emerge onto the streets of Valletta. As well as the people involved in the parades. All the children, and some adults, also wear beautiful costumes and outfits.

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    MALTA'S ENCLOSED BALCONIES

    by balhannah Updated Sep 2, 2012

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    Valletta Balconies
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    The enclosed Balconies intriqued and enchanted me!
    I loved viewing them! Many were still in their original state, and others had been restored beautifully. More will probably be restored with financial help that is forthcoming when wishing to do this.

    There doesn't seem to be any "sure" answer on where they originated from. Some think they are from Arabic origin. In Arabic times, women had to be hidden, however the Maltese didn’t have to hide women. It is believed most Maltese women were housewives and most stayed in the home and didn’t venture out.
    In the balcony, they could sit on high stools, they would be out of sight and watching what was going on outside. Just below the big windows, is a "hidden window," where they can gaze to the street below.

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  • The people of Valletta are...

    by joebriffa Written Sep 7, 2002

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    The people of Valletta are very cosmopolitan having lived with the British, Italian, French, Spaniards,and various other nationalities from India, Pakistan and China for several centuries. Tipping is the usual 10%. Good morning, good day, bonjour, bongiorno, or simply hallo or even hi especially among the younger set are the usual greetings.

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    MERHBA 'Merhba' means...

    by chrissyalex Written Aug 25, 2002

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    MERHBA 'Merhba' means 'Welcome' This picture was taken from the overlook at the Upper Barrakka Gardens. You will also see 'Merhba' written on the signs upon entering the different towns in Malta. Maltese or Malti is a very unique language. About 70% of this language is related to Arabic,but unlike Arabic,it is written in Latin characters. The other 30% of this language reflects the various nationalities that at different times ruled the island,such as Italian,French,English,Spanish etc. The Maltese language consists of 29 letters(5 vowels and 24 consonants) An interesting fact is that Malti did not become a written language until the early 20th century.
    If you are an English speaker, you will absolutely have no difficulty at all communicating in Malta because English along with Malti are the countries two official languages. Everyone speaks English very fluently here. Italian is also widely spoken due to Malta's close proximity to Sicily and also that Malta recieves Italian television programming. Also, Italian was the official language of the Knights of St. John.

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    the Three Cities

    by call_me_rhia Written Jul 19, 2010

    The Three Cities is name which is given to the three fortified cities of Cospicua (Bormla), Vittoriosa (Birgu), and Senglea (Isla) on the Island of Malta, right opposite La Valletta, across the waters of the Grand hrabour. They are enclosed by thefortification created by the Knights of St John, these fortifications are known as the Cottonera Lines. Before La Valletta was built, these cities were the political centre of Malta.

    A lazy way to catch a glimpse of the three cities from the sea is by taking the 90 minutes harbor cruise offered by several tour operators in Sliema.

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    Churches in La Valletta

    by call_me_rhia Written Jul 19, 2010

    Valletta is quite a diminuitive city – being 900 metres long and 630 metres wide. It had just under 6100 inhabitants but when it comes to churches, they are plentiful: the cities has 28 churches, which means 1 every 217 inhabitants.

    One interesting fact is that the first building that went up in the city to commemorate the lifting of the Great Siege was a church, more precisely the Church of Our Lady of Victories along South Street.

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    Go On A Sunday...

    by steventilly Written Feb 16, 2005
    Quiet Sunday In Valletta

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    ...Go Any Other Day

    by steventilly Written Feb 16, 2005
    A Busy Monday In Valletta

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    Lanterns

    by SanguiniA Written Jan 29, 2006

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    Lanterns

    Look out for some nice lanterns around ... they look as if they are at least half a century old ... they probably are even older

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    Mind the step!!

    by SanguiniA Written May 15, 2006

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    Stairs instead of street ....

    In some places in Valletta, the narrow streets are actually stairways ... very interesting and always highly photogenic.

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    Festa decorations

    by Gili_S Updated Aug 6, 2006

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    While walking around in the narrow streets of the old city I notice those nice decorations for the festa in Valletta.

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Valletta Local Customs

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