Churches, Valletta

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  • Our Lady of Victory Church, Valletta
    Our Lady of Victory Church, Valletta
    by antistar
  • St. Paul's Cathedral, Valletta
    St. Paul's Cathedral, Valletta
    by antistar
  • Carmelite Church, Valletta
    Carmelite Church, Valletta
    by antistar
  • babettu's Profile Photo

    Our Lady Of Victory Church

    by babettu Written May 28, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our Lady Of Victory Church is said to be the oldest church in Valletta and was rebuilt in its Baroque architectural style in the mid/ 18th century . It was dedicated to the Virgin Mother as a child ' Il-Bambina". The feast is celebrated on the 8th of September, the same date of the Knights's victory from the Great Seige in 1565.

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    Our Lady of Mount Carmel

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 2, 2005

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    The large white dome of this church is a landmark on the Valletta skyline. This was Valletta's first functional church and opened its doors to the public in 1570. It has obviously undergone several transformnations since then and greatly rebuilt after severe damage in WW2.

    Carmelite church
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    St Paul's Anglican Cathedral

    by sandysmith Updated Feb 12, 2005

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    This church is built on a neo-classical style on the site of the former Auberge d'Allemagne - home of the German Knights of Malta. Its it spire though, rising over 200 feet which along with the dome of the Carmelite Chuch forms the classical view of Valletta.
    This classical view (seen in page intro pic) is best appreciated from the water on a harbour cruise or from Sliema.

    Anglican Cathedral spire
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    Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church

    by Balam Written Jul 28, 2009

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    Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church was originaly dedicated to Our Lady of the Annunciation was the first functional church in Valletta and first opened it's doors in 1570 soon after the Carmolite Friars were granted a piece of land by Grand Master Pietro del Monte, The church was designed by Gerolamo Cassar (c1550-92) but underwent many susequent modifications and additions, The Facade was rebuilt in 1852 to the design Giuseppe Bonavia.

    The Church suffered extensive damage durind World War II and it was decided to Rebuild the church, The 'new church' was constructed between 1958 and 1981 and is by far the most prominate building of Valletta's skyline with 12 Corinthian columns of a rusty red marble that support the huge Dome.

    The main attraction of the church is the early seventeenth century painting of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. This was the first painting on Malta to be 'crowned' by the Vatican in 1981

    Sculptor Chevalier Joseph Damato has sculpted all the interior of the church and work has been ongoing for over 19 years

    Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church
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    St Paul's Shipwreck Church

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 23, 2005

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    Ok Valletta has many fine churches but I just want to show you one more.....
    St Paul is considered to be the spiritual father of the maltese and many churches in Malta are named after St Paul. The Shipwreck of St Paul is a great event in the history of Malta and thus St Paul's Collegiate Church (Shipwreck Church) in Valletta is one of the most important in Malta. We were glad to be here when it was the festa day and the church was lit up like Blackpool illuminations!

    St Paul's lit up
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    The Anglican Cathedral

    by steventilly Updated Feb 13, 2005

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    St Paul's Anglican Cathedral is huge, with a neoclassical facade and a tall spire, which forms part of Valletta's most famous aspect as seen from Sliema. The cathedral dates from 1839 and is little used these days as the number of anglicans on the island dwindles.
    Inside the cathedral is clean and simple, bright and airy. We spent a nice half hour or so in conversation there with a Maltese/Canadian who now tends the cathedral.

    St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral

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    The Carmelite Church

    by steventilly Updated Feb 13, 2005

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    The Carmelite Church is the name more frequently given to "Our Lady Of Mount Carmel", the huge domed church that stands near Valletta's northern waterfront. This dome and the spire of St. Paul's Anglican make up part of the most famous view of Valletta, and perhaps of Malta.
    The church is huge - it's almost impossible to get a better shot than this too, as it is hemmed in by buildings making it almost impossible to get a shot from nearby.
    It is said (true or not?) that the church was built with the intention of overshadowing the Anglican Cathedral, something that it doesn't quite do - they simply complement one another (IMO).

    Carmelite & Anglican

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    Our Lady Of Victory

    by steventilly Updated Feb 13, 2005

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    This was the first building to be erected in Valletta, around 1566. It commemorates the lifting of the first Great Siege and used to contain the body of Valletta's founder - Jean De La Vallette (he's now in the Co-Cathedral).
    It's just one of several fine looking buildings clustered around the ruins of The Royal Opera House

    Our Lady Of Victories

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    Festa Experience

    by sandysmith Updated Feb 14, 2005

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    Normally the festa of St Paul's Shipwreck is Feb 10th but was brought forward due to Lent being early. The banners and decorations in the streets were all out and a party atmsosphere ensued - the actual processsion of the statue didn't take place though as possibility of rain meant the treasured staute that is normally paraded through the streets could be damaged. Even so it was a colourful expeience and if you are around for a festa - there are so many then go and enjoy the fun.

    festa scene
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    St Paul's Shipwreck Interior

    by sandysmith Updated Feb 12, 2005

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    The interior of the shipwreck church was richly decorated with red drapes - whether this was just for the festa or normal I'm not sure as the church had such a wealth of treasures inside - never seen so much on display in a church - and the paintings were really colourful. Certianly seemed a popular church to visit so put it on your must see list.

    peeping in

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    Shipwreck Church Prized Treasure

    by sandysmith Written Feb 12, 2005

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    The most prized, and most protected treasure in the Shipwreck Church is this claimed relic of the right wrist bone of St Paul and part of the column on which he was beheaded. Sometimes it is covered up and not for public viewing - this was the case of the festa day when so many people were milling around the church and outside on the streets - we quicklly popped in on another day and managed to see it.

    wrist bone relic treasure
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    Carmelite Church

    by antistar Written Jan 13, 2013

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    Easily the most outstanding feature of Valletta's skyline is the dome of the Carmelite Church. It was Valletta's first church, built in 1570, but has been damaged many times since. The greatest damage came during World War 2, and Axis bombs forced the reconstruction of the magnificent 62 meter high dome.

    Inside the Carmelite church is less spectacular, especially when compared to the Co-Cathedral nearby. The interior of the dome, however, is impressive and covers the atrium and altar.

    Carmelite Church, Valletta Carmelite Church, Valletta Carmelite Church, Valletta Carmelite Church, Valletta

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    Our Lady of Victory Church

    by call_me_rhia Written Jun 12, 2010

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    Our Lady of Victory is a special church because it was the first one to be built in la Valletta. The place where it stands is very symbolic: it’s where the first stone of the new city was set on 28 March 1566, after having defeated the Turks during the 'Great Siege' of 1565. The Grand Master Jean Parisot de Vallette was originally buried in this church before being moved to St John's Co-Cathedral.

    Initially, however, it was not a church but a chapel dedicated to Our Lady of Victory, it was only in the 18th century that the building was enlarged, a belfry added, and it became a church.

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    Our Lady of Victory

    by MikeAtSea Updated Jul 7, 2009

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    This small church was the first the knights built in their new city to commemorate their victory in the Great Siege of 1565. De La Valette laid the foundation stone and was initially buried here before being interred in St. John's Co Cathedral.

    Our Lady of Victory
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    Church of St. Catherine of Italy

    by MikeAtSea Written Jul 7, 2009

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    This church was designed by Cassar for the Italian knights and abutting their auberge. The facade and porch were added in 1713 and the octagonal church is still used today by the Italian community. The main altarpiece is of the Martyrdom of St. Catherine.

    Church of St. Catherine of Italy Church of St. Catherine of Italy
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