Churches, Valletta

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  • Our Lady of Victory Church, Valletta
    Our Lady of Victory Church, Valletta
    by antistar
  • St. Paul's Cathedral, Valletta
    St. Paul's Cathedral, Valletta
    by antistar
  • Carmelite Church, Valletta
    Carmelite Church, Valletta
    by antistar
  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Our Lady of Victory

    by MikeAtSea Updated Jul 7, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our Lady of Victory

    This small church was the first the knights built in their new city to commemorate their victory in the Great Siege of 1565. De La Valette laid the foundation stone and was initially buried here before being interred in St. John's Co Cathedral.

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    Church of St. Catherine of Italy

    by MikeAtSea Written Jul 7, 2009

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    Church of St. Catherine of Italy
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    This church was designed by Cassar for the Italian knights and abutting their auberge. The facade and porch were added in 1713 and the octagonal church is still used today by the Italian community. The main altarpiece is of the Martyrdom of St. Catherine.

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    Anglican Cathedral

    by Balam Updated Sep 21, 2009

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    Anglican Cathedral
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    St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral, was the first Protestant church built in Malta. The building was conceived in 1838 by Queen Adelaide (Dowager Queen of King William IV) who at the time was convalescing in Malta due to a serious illness and could not belive that there was no place of Anglican worship on the island. Queen Adelaide contributed the sum of £10,000 towards the building, and the first stone was laid in March 1839.

    The site of the church was formerly occupied by the Auberge of Germany which was dimolished to make room for the Cathedral. The plans were drawn by a British architect, who also supervised the works during the construction some structural defects started to develop and the architect committed suicide. The works stopped for some time resuming in 1842 then under the direction of Frank Scamp who was another British engineer that happened to be in Malta engaged on the construction of the first drydock.

    The Cathedral was completed in 1844 at a total cost of 20,000 pounds and was consecrated in the same year by the Bishop of Gibraltar and it falls under the jurisdiction of the Anglican See of Gibraltar.
    A congregation of upto 1,500 persons can be accommodated inside the church

    The main attraction of the Cathedral is its fine classical portico made up of eight ionic columns and the Gothic spire which is 60 metres high and one of the landmarks of Valletta.

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    St Paul's Shipwreck Church

    by tim07 Written Nov 22, 2009

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built between 1639 and 1740 this lovely Baroque church is hidden away on Triq San Pawl. In the depths of the church is claimed to be the wristbone of St Paul & part of the pillar on which he was beheaded.

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    Our Lady of Mount Carmel

    by Eszter Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    Its giant dome is one of the most impressive points in Valletta's skyline. Originally, a church built in 1570 stood here, but it was destroyed in the second world war and this church was erected in its palce in the 1950s.

    Opening hours:
    daily 6.00-12.00 and 16.00-19.00

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    The Garrison Church

    by steventilly Updated Feb 13, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Garrison Church

    This building is close to the entrance of the Upper Barakka Gardens. It is the Garrison Church, once the church of the British garrison stationed in Valletta (no sh*t sherlock) and it is now the Maltese Stock Exchange.

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    ST. PUBLIUS CHURCH

    by balhannah Updated Sep 1, 2012

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    St. Publius Church
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    St. Publius was the 1st Governor of Malta and it's believed he was consecrated first Bishop of Malta.
    It was in 60AD, during the Roman period he was converted to Christianity.
    The people of Floriana, Valletta, chose Publius as their patron saint and dedicated to him their parish church.
    The first stone was laid in 1733, but during to lack of funds, work on the structure was delayed until 1792, when the nave was completed and the building was then consecrated as a vice-parish church. More additions were made later, and after the war. The statue of St. Publius, is carried in procession during the annual feast day, dating from 1815.

    I actually came across this Church by chance, and even though I couldn't go inside, I was impressed with what I saw.
    The temple fronts Granaries Square which is the venue of religious congregations and other gatherings of a social and political nature.

    Worth seeing!

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    FLIGHT TO EGYPT CHURCH

    by balhannah Updated Sep 1, 2012

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    Flight to Egypt
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    As I walked along the waterfront, I nearly missed this little Chapel, you would hardly know it's there. All that gave it away for me, was the different coloured door [white] and designs. It was nestled in amongst the Grand Harbour waterfront shops. The style of the façade is baroque, and has two bell towers, imposing cornices and baroque detailing.
    The Chapel was constructed under the reign of Grand Master Pinto in the 1750s, and was used by departing and arriving sailors. In this historic area, it is easy to stand here and imagine the crews of the galleons of the "Knights of St. John", and the many international seafarers and merchants coming here to worship.

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    OUR LADY OF VICTORIES CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Sep 3, 2012

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    Our Lady of Victories Church

    Our Lady of Victory Church was the first church to be built in Valletta by the Order of St John.
    Initially, this Church was dedicated to the Nativity of Our lady but later was dedicated to Our Lady of Victory, to commemorate the end of the Great Siege.
    The founder of the city, Grand Master La Vallette, was buried here, but his remains were later transferred to the Cathedral. Our Lady of Victory Church was rebuilt in its baroque architectural style in the mid-18th century.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    CHURCH OF ST. BARBARA

    by balhannah Written Sep 3, 2012

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    Church of St. Barbara

    St Barbara’s Church was built in 1573 for the Knights of the Auberge of Provence, which is just across the road. This quite small Church was rebuilt in1739, and in 1904, a statue of the Virgin Mary was placed in the facade of the church. The Statue was placed there to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the proclamation of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception. It is the parish church for English, French and German speaking Maltese residents.

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  • Oana_bic's Profile Photo

    Lovely squares, fountains & gardens

    by Oana_bic Written May 4, 2005

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    Walking around Valletta, you'll come across an intriguing historical site around every corner: votive statues, niches, fountains and coats of arms high up on parapets. And when you need to stop and take it all in, the city yields up squares, courtyards, gardens and any number of cafés, right on cue.

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    Shopping on Republic street

    by Oana_bic Written May 4, 2005

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    The city is a delight to shop in: narrow side streets are full of tiny shops selling antiques, maps, books, prints and jewellery. For good quality fashion though quite pricey, music and much more try Valletta's main streets - Republic Street and Merchants Street.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Carmelite Church

    by call_me_rhia Written Jun 12, 2010

    My two first impressions of La Valletta, seen from across the harbor in Sliema, were the protective walls that surround it completely and the large dome belonging Carmelite church that dominates the skyline. Imagine my displeasure when I found out that the dome did not belong to any significant building, especially the cathedral.

    This church was built in 1573, then it was heavily damaged in World War II and rebuilt. This time it was also enlarged and the dome was added: and guess what? It is just a bit higher than the nearby of St Paul's Anglican Cathedra’s spire

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    St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral

    by call_me_rhia Written Jun 12, 2010

    St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral is the other cathedral of La Valletta and it is also the first Protestant church built in Malta. It took 6 years and the suicide of one of the architects to build this cathedral, and it was completed only in Cathedral 1844 – the Bishop of Gibraltar consecrated it the same year.

    The cathedral can accommodate 1500 people and the pointed steeple, which you can see lit up at night from far away, is the 65 metres high. A curiosity: for some obscure reason this building falls under the jurisdiction of the Anglican See of Gibraltar.

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  • AnitaJRT's Profile Photo

    Be sure to see the church...

    by AnitaJRT Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Be sure to see the church right off the main square as you enter the city gates.
    Just gorgeous with marble, tile work, and lovely paintings.

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