Tiraspol Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by lotharscheer
  • Local Customs
    by lotharscheer
  • Local Customs
    by lotharscheer

Most Recent Local Customs in Tiraspol

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    Patriotism!

    by lotharscheer Written Jun 20, 2015

    Tiraspol has monuments everywhere, tanks ready to defend, together with ortodox chapels, giant Lenin statues.
    1990 when Moldavia was considering uniting with Romania the citizens in Tiraspol (and Bendery) passed a referendum declaring the city as an independent territory. Schools teaching Romanian and Latin script have been closed. Now you see only Cyrillic script, mostly in Russian.

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    WHO’S THE DADDY (NOW)?

    by DAO Written Aug 2, 2014

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    Igor Nikolaevich Smirnov is the Father of Transdniester. In fact you will see his photo just about everywhere. He was scheduled to be President for Life in typical Soviet style, but has had a few problems in recent years. Smirnov was born in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in Russia on October 23, 1941. His father was a loyal member of the Communist Party and rose to the position of First Secretary of the Golopristanskiy Raion (district) committee in Soviet Ukraine. In 1952 his father was arrested and imprisoned for some charge or other that was common during the murderous rule of Joseph Stalin. Stalin died a year later and the Smirnovs reunited.

    Smirnov took a job in Ukraine and married Zhannetta Nikolaevna Lotnik in the early 1960. He served in the Soviet Army from 1963-1966 then joined the Communist Party of the Soviet Union after his service. He was given the directorship of the "Elektromash" Electronics Concern in Tiraspol in 1987. In 1989 he became the Chairman of the Tiraspol city soviet.

    As the Soviet Union began to unravel quickly in the 1980’s, people were divided in the Moldavian SSR over both language (Moldavian, Russian) and alignment (Romania or Russia). In August 1989 it was decided Moldovan would be made the only official language. Smirnov organised industrial workers in Tiraspol to create the United Work Collective Council and led crippling strikes in the region.

    When this didn’t work, Smirnov ran successfully in the 1990 Moldovan parliamentary elections. He then ran for the chairmanship of the Tiraspol local government at well. He began to work with other like-mined politicians to create their own Soviet republic that would remain a part of the Soviet Union and not become independent with the rest of the Moldova. Interestingly the USSR government was against such a move.

    Smirnov helped create First All-region Congress of Transnistrian June 1990 and he was elected Chairman. He then declared himself President of the Pridnestrovian Moldovan Republic (PMR). These separatists moves started to result in hostile action from opposing parties and Smirnov worked with the locally stationed Red Army unit, most being locals, to gain weapons and ammunition. Igor then declared independence from Moldova on 2 September 1990.

    Between March and July 1992, there was an actual small scale war with Moldova. It was concluded by a ceasefire – which has left the whole situation with Transdniester and Moldova unresolved.

    With support of the Putin/ Medvedev monopoly in Russia, Smirnov won three further elections after 1991. All were by Soviet Union type margin of victory of course. The leaders of United Russia, the ruling political party of Russia, fell out with Smirnov prior to the December 2011 elections. Igor Smirnov came in third with 24.82% of the vote.

    People who upset Putin never do well, but Igor is having the last laugh here. He is the secret and success behind the second largest business in Transdniester – called ‘Sheriff’. The largest store and in fact a lot of businesses in Tiraspol are all Sheriff stores. And the ‘national’ football (soccer) team and stadium? Yes it called Sheriff. So good old Igor is laughing all the way to the bank!

    FATHER IGOR MEDVEDEV (PUTIN'S BITCH) AND DADDY IGOR LOOK OUT IGOR - HE'S BEHIND YOU ! WHO'S THE DADDY? STILL IGOR
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    WHAT IS THE NAME AGAIN?

    by DAO Updated Jul 24, 2014

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    Tiraspol is the Capital City of - well - now it gets confusing! The city and the surrounding area declared itself separate from Moldova on 2 September 1990. Since then, and even interchangeably now, they have a multitude of names for this new 'country'. This is not helped by the fact that they have 3 official languages: Russian, Moldavian, and Ukrainian. So to start with you have:

    • Russian: Приднестровская Молдавская Республика (Pridnestrovskaya Moldavskaya Respublika), abbreviated ПМР
    • Moldavian Cyrillic: Република Молдовеняскэ Нистрянэ (Republica Moldovenească Nistreană), abbreviated РМН
    • Ukrainian: Придністровська Молдавська Республіка (rydnistrovs'ka Moldavs'ka Respublika), abbreviated ПМР

    Then in English you have varieties like:
    • Transnistria
    • Trans-Dniester
    • Transdneister
    • Transdniestr

    Moldavian Cyrillic:Република Молдовеняскэ Нистрянэ BACK IN THE USSR ! EVEN THE MONEY IS CONFUSED ! STILL IN THE USSR?
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    DRINK A KVAS

    by DAO Written Jul 21, 2014

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    Kvas (looks like KBAC in Russian) is a most Eastern European drink. Essentially it is fermented bread that has a low alcohol content of about .5 to 1.5%. It is made from stale rye bread, sugar, yeast, water and raisins. Dark rye bread is used for a darker version and some variants are flavoured with herbs, mint or fruits like strawberries. For just over half of a US Dollar you can get a full litre of this classic drink.

    Kvas is an ancient Slavic drink that derives its name from the old Ukrainian language and means simply ‘sour drink’. Because it is high in vitamins B and C it has always been held up as a health drink. In fact it can stave off Scurvy. In Soviet times it was a cheap, popular drink that was cheap to mass produce. It is widely drunk across the former Soviet Union, Baltic States, here in Moldova and Poland.

    So how does it taste? Well, personally I don’t rate it. It tastes kind of bland and slightly sour. I would recommend some of the flavored Kvas varieties available from the larger Kvas stalls. They also served it chilled which makes it taste better.

    KVAS VENDOR KVAS VENDOR KVAS VENDOR KVAS VENDOR KVAS VENDOR
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    THE FLAG OF TRANSDNISTRIA

    by DAO Written Jul 21, 2014

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    Tiraspol and the rest of 'Transdnistra' declared themselves independent of Moldova on 2 September 1990. They flew a variety of flags at first including the old USSR Flag. They finally settled on the current version on 3 July 2000. It is actually a version of the old Moldavia SSR (A Soviet Republic) including today's Moldova. More official versions actually have a hammer and sickle on the flag as well.

    THE FLAG OF TRANSDNISTRIA THE FLAG OF TRANSDNISTRIA THE FLAG OF TRANSDNISTRIA THE FLAG OF TRANSDNISTRIA
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    The capitol that ain't!

    by arturowan Updated Jan 29, 2014

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    Tiraspol' is the 'capitol' of the Pridnestrovian Republica of Moldaviya - I use inverted comma's, because it's an unrecognised capitol in a disputed territory, which is recognised by the UN as still constituting Moldova...
    0fficially it is a civil war zone, although there has not been a resumption in hostilities between the neighbours with the Dniester river running between them, since the original territorial split in 1990
    The War of Transnistria took place in 1992 - but received little international coverage...
    Rather than "war, war", these days both sides prefer, in the words of Winston Churchill, to "jaw, jaw" - each accusing the others government of being corrupt & a centre of international drugs, arms, & prostitute smuggling...
    Many claim that the disputed, TransDniester area is a throwback to the era behind 'the iron curtain' - however, centralised control from Moscow did not tolerate breakaway states, & intervened with a heavy use of troops, at just the hint of insurrection...
    In this respect, however unchanged the streets of Tiraspol' might be from bygone communist days, the fact it even claims to exist, is at distinct odds with all that was the Soviet Union ('sovyetskiy soyuz' = 'council of unions'...)
    Tiraspol' is very exact about its national identity, (despite the fact it's a small city in a country that when divided, is about half the size of an Englsih county), & as you can see from the photo, has chosen its national colours to stand out from its neighbours...
    For somewhere known for a past of drab, communist-era tower blocks, its primary school bright, flag of identity, is a stark contrast to the politics it's supposed to still represent...
    I cannot recommend or not, whether you visit Tiraspol', because I did not get there - I did not wish to go alone, because of all the scare stories I had read about crossing the border...
    However, though I feel rather a fake in adding this tip to somewhere I have not (yet) been, my original reason for visiting Ukraine was in order to meet some1 from Tiraspol' (!)
    I use an exclamation mark, because I have never met anybody quite like this person from Tiraspol' - even by the idiosyncratic nature reputed to 0dessans, (& she had lived in 0dessa half her life, because work is reputedly, uneasy to find in Tiraspol') my enigmatic host, was, in the words of Eddie Cochrane - Somethin'Else...
    The local slang for such a person, is 'teepcheek', which literally translates as; 'a type'...
    I still do not know what to make of her - I think she was what you might call, a flibberty-gibbet - anyway, she was so unreliable in introducing me to 'her' city of 0dessa, I did not care to push my luck & venture to Tiraspol', only 100km to the west...
    This is now a great regret, because I survived all that befell me in Ukraine, including the supposedly 'criminal city' of 0dessa...
    So, I reserve judgement on Tiraspol', until I actually go there, & knowing what I do now, about local attitudes, customs, & language, I hope I achieve this in the not so distant future...
    (The official 'yizik' of Tiraspol' is Russian, which includes a letter known as 'the soft sign', which affects the pronunciation of the final 'l' - see photo - therefore I use an apostrophe to indicate it...)

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    Currency - Transdniester Rouble

    by pure1942 Written Nov 3, 2011

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    Since 1994 Transdniester has had its own currency, the Transdniester Rouble. Roughly equal to the Moldovan lei in value (€1 = 16MDL $1 = 11MDL) the rouble can only be used within Transdniester and is worthless outside the region. Dollars and even MDL may be accepted within Transdniester but you should change some currency to be on the safe side. You can easily change lei/hrivna/dollars/euros at the train/bus station on arrival in Tiraspol and you can change back whatever you have left over when leaving. Makes a nice souvenir too. Banknotes are issued in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200 and 500. Transdniester also has its own coinage (kopecks).

    Transdniester Rouble

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  • Use the Transnistrian Ruble

    by Jetgirly Written Oct 31, 2010

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    Since 1994, Transnistria has been using its own currency. Previously, they had been using Soviet and Russian bills with little stickers stuck on! Today, there are about ten rubles to the US dollar.

    Because Transnistra isn't recognized internationally, the Transnistrian ruble isn't of any use outside the region. There are two currency exchanges at the bus and train station in Tiraspol; they will convert your Moldovan lei into Transnistrian rubles, and they will also convert your remaining rubles back into lei when you depart (make sure to buy your bus ticket and snacks first though!). Nobody outside of Transnistria will change your rubles, nor accept them for payment.

    I actually kept all of my rubles when I left Tiraspol... after all, it's not often you get your hands on the currency of a country that doesn't exist!

    25- , 5- and 1-Ruble Notes in Transnistria
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