Tiraspol Warnings and Dangers

  • Karl Marx Street
    Karl Marx Street
    by pure1942
  • Lenin Street
    Lenin Street
    by pure1942
  • They want to be a part of Russia
    They want to be a part of Russia
    by A-Friend-Of-Belarus

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Tiraspol

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    Russian Street Signs

    by pure1942 Updated Nov 4, 2011

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    Lenin Street
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    People arriving in Tiraspol from Chisinau may be taken by surprise by the absence of ANY signage written in the Latin alphabet. As a region almost more Russian than Russia itself, a Latin alphabet user shouldn't expect easy navigation through the streets of Tiraspol. All street signs are written in the Cyrillic alphabet and you will need to familiarise yourself with Cyrllic characters. I have included a basic cyrillic to latin list below. I hope it's accurate, a friend I met travelling wrote down the characters for me and they have never let me down... if anybody spots any mistakes please let me know ;)
    BTW - Moldovan/Romanian is almost as useless in Transdniester as a latin alphabet. Very few people here speak (or at least admit to speaking) Moldovan/Romanian. A few basic Russian phrases may come in useful.

    a - 'ah'
    б - 'b'
    в - 'v'
    г - 'g'
    д - 'd'
    е - 'yay'
    ё - 'yo!'
    ж - 'zh'
    п - 'p'
    з - 'z'
    и - 'ee'
    й - 'y'
    к - 'k'
    л - 'l'
    м - 'm'
    н - 'n'
    о - 'oh'
    р - 'r'
    с - 's'
    т - 't'
    у - 'oo'
    ф - 'f'
    х - 'kh'
    ц - 'ts'
    ч - 'ch'
    ш - 'sh'
    щ - 'shch
    Ъ - silent
    ы - ‘e’ or ‘i’
    Ь - silent
    э - 'eh'
    ю - 'yu'
    я - 'ya'

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    Taking Pictures

    by pure1942 Written Nov 3, 2011

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    You will hear a lot of horror stories about Transdniester involving incidents of corruption and brushes with the law. Some of these are nonsense and some should be heeded as warnings. One piece of advice I was given to avoid any unpleasantness in Transdniester was to refrain from taking any pictures of sensitive buildings, bridges, military installations and political offices. Sounds like common sense but apparently in Transdniester this borders on the obsessive with many tourists having their cameras confiscated in the past amid accusations of taking photos of sensitive objects. Things don’t seem quite as bad as this but nevertheless you should probably steer clear of taking pictures anywhere near the river and bridges, presidential palace and a definite no-no is taking pictures of military personnel and when crossing the border.

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    Registration

    by pure1942 Written Nov 3, 2011

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    Rules and regulations for entry and staying in Transdniester seem to change like the weather but during my visit in August 2011 visitors no longer needed to pay for an entry card and could stay for up to 8 hours without registering. Some reports indicate that you can stay for 24 hours but this seems to have changed. On entry you will be told what time to leave by and this time will be written on the top of your entry/departure card and this time indicated that I had 8 yours to leave or else to register with the authorities. If you plan on staying overnight or for longer than 8 hours you must register with OVIR on ul. Kotovskogo no. 2A. This office is open Mon – Fri 9.00-17.00. Outside these hours you must go to the Tiraspol Militia Office on Roza Luxembourg. You may or may not be able to register here so try and make it to the OVIR office if you can. Bear in mind that hotels are very reluctant to accept guests who have not registered.

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  • Frontier bribery

    by socheid Written Aug 11, 2011

    I read some of the online comments about bribing the corrupt officials at the frontier. I was traveling by public mini bus. The bus driver collected the passports of the passengers and sure enough since I was traveling on a UK passport, I was summonsed into an office where there was 2 border guards waiting for me. They spun me a few lines about my passport and visas not being in order and how he would have to send me back to Chisinau. Then of course came the 'I pretend I do not see if you pay some money'. I handed over the cash that was in my wallet, around 200 Moldovan lei. The officer said that he wanted more. I told him that was all I had on me and indeed showed him that my wallet was now empty. I said that if he wanted more we could go to an ATM.

    I was given back my passport and I continued with my journey.

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    Politics

    by A-Friend-Of-Belarus Written May 24, 2010

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    They want to be a part of Russia
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    Avoid political conversation. The vast majority of people in Tiraspol believe Pridnestrovie is an independent country that has nothing to do with Moldova. That's why you can see all these pro-Russian billboards and posters on the streets.

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  • Transnistria

    by metox Written Sep 11, 2007

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    Coming from Moldava, there is no Moldavian Border Post. You will pass the Russian Peacekeeper post, nothing happens there.
    Then you come to the Transnistrian border post, you have to show your passport, your details are written in a book and you get a little piece of paper (the visa?) Thats it is your entrance to Transnistria.
    If you want to leave the passports are checked by an Officer, he collects the little piece of paper and asks you to come to the office. You have to go into a background room (some big knive will be visable or similar things) and you are told that your papers are not in order. The officer who is examinating you (it is just one officer) will give you pressure. After searching your belongings (to find out how much he can get out of you) he will tell you that you have a problem, no stamp in your passport. After some discussion he will tell you how much it is to solve the problem. Negotiation is difficult, I think he is under pressure to deliver money to his officer. After some useless negotiation you will pay. He will make you understand that you are in a bad situation and it feels really awful, you just want to get out.

    I had to pay about 40$ to get out, unfortunally I had a big wallet with me. My compainion was a student and it was obvious that he had less money, he had to pay about 25$.

    Tips: If you pay in a foreign currency - have a bill of the exchange rate with you, otherwise the exchange rate will be fixed on his will and of cause that is to your disadvantage.
    Make a copy of the piece of paper you get, if he tells you that something is missing you can provide copy of the missing papers (I have not tried this but it might help to negotiate - perhaps it is a bad idea - I have not tried it) Better have several copies.
    Dont take any valuables with you, as few money as possible, the bribe is estimated by the impression you make. You will be searched for hidden pockets. I have been there by public bus, not in my own car. The bribe may be different if you go there by car.

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  • lotharlerch's Profile Photo

    Find the OVIR immediately after arrival!

    by lotharlerch Updated Apr 18, 2005

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    Transnistrian 5 Rouble

    As a non-post-soviet foreigner you are only entitled to enter Transnistria for three hours. Before the 3 hours are over you have either to show up at the frontier post or register with the OVIR. I hope you succeed to find the OVIR early enough in this case.. Do not expect to find it on a street map of the city -such a thing does not exist because that is treated as a military secret. And nobody is able or allowed to help you with any useful information to find it - for more see my travelogue.... If you fail to reach OVIR in time you will at least have to pay hefty fines in Dollars.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips

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Tiraspol Warnings and Dangers

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