Terwolde Travel Guide

  • Nijbroek - church
    Nijbroek - church
    by vtveen
  • Dorpsplein (village square)
    Dorpsplein (village square)
    by vtveen
  • Terwolde - church tower with saddle roof
    Terwolde - church tower with saddle roof
    by vtveen

Terwolde Things to Do

  • vtveen's Profile Photo
    Terwolde - church on the square 3 more images

    by vtveen Updated Jul 9, 2010

    The old Protestant church of Terwolde is a real ‘village church’. It is located on the tree lined square, the heart of the village with the only super market and the church. The square in front of the church has a bench - meeting point for the locals - and an old water pump.

    The church - dating back about seven hundred years - is early Gothic and demonstrates that Terwolde must have been a significant village in the Middle Ages. The church is owned by the parish, the tower on the other hand by the civil community. Church. organ and tower are protected monuments. The plump tower has a remarkable saddle roof and can be seen from some distance.

    The interior has some nice wall and vault paintings, but I have to admit that I didn’t see them till yet (only on the internet, see for instance: http://www.historischcentrumoverijssel.nl/NR/rdonlyres/4DD1AEA6-8933-4A2B-BB00-52A6C7F2552C/0/03.pdf. or http://www.santiago.nl/jacobaliafoto/jac-ge-30.html and http://picasaweb.google.com/jackardolus/CosmasEnDamianusTerwolde#)

    As many churches - especially in smaller villages - in the Netherlands the church isn’t open for visitors. Just during regular services and special events it is open. But perhaps an inhabitant could help you, because I’m sure they are very proud of this little gem.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    Flour mill 'De Ooievaar' 4 more images

    by vtveen Written Jul 7, 2010

    ’De Ooievaar’ (The Stork) has had quite a couple of changes since the construction of the original mill in 1854. After a fire in 1896 a new mill was built, which was called ‘De Ooievaar’. In 1973 it burned down again and it took 12 years before the reconstruction was started and in 1990 the mill was reopened. Parts of a mill from Deventer were used for the reconstruction .
    ‘De Ooievaar’ is a so called smock mill (named after the shape of the linen smock of a countryman), built on a brick base with an octagonal wooden thatched tower.

    Driving back home on a Saturday I saw that the mill in Terwolde had its doors opened and I decided to take a look inside. On the ground floor are a small mill shop - selling all kinds of flour - and a kind of office for the miller. I was allowed to take a look on my own in the whole mill and started climbing the steep staircases till the third floor.

    This floor is holding the milling machinery with its impressive mill stones; the other floors do have ancillary machinery; among them appliances for filling bags and sacks with flour. On the second floor is a small door to the gallery of the mill and walking around I even could touch the tip of the sweeps.

    It is obvious the mill is still in order grinding grain for bakeries, shops, other mills and consumers with their modern bread makers. If possible the mill is using the wind, if necessary there is an engine to drive the stones.

    I found flour everywhere: on the floors, the machinery, the windows and the steps, which make them rather slippery.

    If you ever want to see a flour mill, still being in order, you should travel to Terwolde and take a look inside ‘De Ooievaar’. At least I found it very interesting.
    The mill(shop) is open Thursday and Friday 1.00 pm - 4.00 pm; on Saturday from 10.00 am – 4.00 pm the mill can be visited.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    Nijbroek - 'city center' 3 more images

    by vtveen Updated Jul 4, 2010

    Nowadays Nijbroek is one of those peaceful and quiet rural villages in the Netherlands. And driving, biking or walking around it is almost unbelievable it ever had city rights and there were plans to make it a real city. Most probably it was cancelled because the city of Deventer was too close to Nijbroek.
    Nijbroek was a separate municipality until 1820, when it was merged with Voorst

    Nijbroek is located in the middle of a polder, which was reclaimed by monks in the 14th century. In 1814 the area around the village had its last flooding. Originally Nijbroek has a so called ribbon development along the Middendijk and the most historical buildings/farmhouses are standing along this dike.

    A lot of the heritage of Nijbroek can be seen when walking the so called ‘Niebroekerpad’, a signposted path through the rural landscape. See for info and a map: http://www.pressart.nl/import/assetmanager/6/2356/Niebroekerpad_folder.pdf

    At the ‘Dorpsplein’ (village square) you will find two monuments; one of them is the MKZ (Foot and Mouth Disease) monument, referring to the 2001 epidemic which took part also in this part of the Netherlands.

    By far the most important touristy site of Nijbroek is the 14th century village church. The original chapel, devoted to Saint Remigius, became in the year 1339 a Parish Church with an own pastor and was dedicated to Saint Gregory.
    The church and tower date from the 14th century and its tower was raised in the 15th century, the old belfry lapsed. The choir dates from the 15th century. In the church are remains of 15th century paintings found. The organ was built in 1816 by H. Knipscheer.
    In the early eighties of the twentieth century the church was restored.

    We visited Nijbroek on a sunny Sunday and it was just a pity the church was not opened for visitors (as often - Protestant - churches are closed for visitors in the Netherlands). In the meantime I had a phone call with one of the volunteers of the church and heard it is only open during services, special events and by appointment (Mw. H.T.Hilbrink 0571-291885). You also could ask some of the locals to help you around.
    I will try to visit again as soon as possible and add pics of the interior.

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Terwolde Restaurants

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    blooming and smelling roses 4 more images

    by vtveen Updated Jul 1, 2010

    On one of our bike trips around our hometown Apeldoorn we came across this tearoom, which we never had heard about. Owners told us they just started their ‘business’ a year ago.

    They are open from April until October and perhaps the best time for a visit is a nice summer day as we had. It is so lovely sitting in the garden in the shadow of a fruit tree just drinking your tea (or coffee) and enjoying the quietness of this spot. ‘De Stamroos’ is servicing tea, coffee, soft drinks, cakes and pies - highly recommend having a home made apple crumble pie- and ice cream. By appointment it is also possible to have a high tea.

    The garden has a huge variety of roses with a (frog) pond in the middle; nice to walk around.
    If you want to start your own rose garden, you can buy roses in pots.

    If the weather isn’t that good visitors find a seat inside in a tasteful converted shed. It has a wood stove and a shop whit ‘rose related’ gifts.

    Opening hours
    From April 1th to October 1th on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday from 10.30 am - 6.00 pm.
    Or by appointment with at least 6 persons.

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