Fun things to do in Provincie Gelderland

  • Burgers ZOO
    Burgers ZOO
    by JuliaMac
  • Raadhuis Overloking Its Square
    Raadhuis Overloking Its Square
    by johngayton
  • The Modern Replacement
    The Modern Replacement
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Provincie Gelderland

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    Elburg - city walk

    by vtveen Updated Nov 18, 2014

    Elburg is a very old fortified city, already built in the 14th century. The city has not changed a bit since then. It is situated between its walls in a square outline with straight narrow streets; the old houses, churches and other buildings are crammed together.

    We have been several times in Elburg and it is always a pleasure to stroll through the cobble stoned streets, along all the monuments. Besides the city offers some nice shops and side walk café’s for a cup of coffee or a lunch.

    If you are first time visitor I highly recommend going to the Visitor Information Centre (VVV) in the city. They do have a brochure (€ 1,75) with a very interesting walk. So you won’t miss any of the most important monuments.
    If possible try to ascend the tower of the “St. Nicolaaskerk”. From the top there is a lovely view over the city and the neighbourhood.
    Attention: the stairs are very steep, winding and narrow !!!

    On your walk you will see the “Vischpoort”; behind this city gate is the harbour. In the former days Elburg was also a fishing village. Nowadays there are just pleasure yachts and some old restored fishing boats.

    (If you have some spare time I recommend visiting the Zwaluwenburg, nearby Elburg.)

    Information: VVV - Visitor Information Centre, located in the 'Museum Elburg', Jufferenstraat 6-8

    Elburg - harbour Fisherman's house Former city hall St. Nicolaaskerk View from St. Nicolaaskerk
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Bronkhorst, one of the smallest CITIES

    by vtveen Written Nov 18, 2014

    When visiting Bronkhorst almost nobody will say this village is a real city with 'city rights'. In a matter of fact this settlement became these rights already in the year of 1482. The little church at the square even dates from 1344 !!

    But the 'city' did never increase and has almost the same size as it had in the middle ages. A lot of buildings are from this period and walking around on the cobble stoned streets we always feel if we are walking back in time.

    Just stroll along the narrow streets, take a look in one of the galleries, visit the Dickens Museum, do some shopping, walk to the old Jewish Cemetery or have a coffee or tea on one of the side walk cafe's.
    Most shops and galleries are also open on Sundays (afternoon) en holidays.

    Bronkhorst: one of the main streets Bronkhorst: town square Bronkhorst: one of the galleries Bronkhorst: Dickens tour Bronkhorst: ferry over the river IJssel
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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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    Arnhem - Winter in the ‘Open Air Museum’

    by vtveen Written Nov 18, 2014

    On one of the coldest days of the year (2006) we went to the Netherlands Open Air Museum (Nederlands Openluchtmuseum) to experience ‘the Winter in the Museum’. Since a couple of years the museum is also open during the winter season, which means from early December till mid January (see for openinghours the website of the museum).

    During this time there are special winter activities in the museum. The most remarkable is the outside skating ring, where one can enjoy ice skating and it is no problem if you don’t have your own skates, you can borrow them free of charge.

    Every day there are different (winter) activities like demonstrations of old Dutch crafts, singing of a choir in a church, a procession with lanterns for children and baking bread on open fires. We saw also a movie with pictures of some real Dutch winters.

    Of course a lot of the old buildings, farmhouses and mills are open and can be visited during the opening hours. Walking around we met some ‘inhabitants’ doing their daily jobs. The old grocery shop was open and in the bakery we had an ‘oliebol’, a Dutch delicacy during this time of the year.

    !! Be aware on Boxing Day it can be overcrowded on some places !!
    Opening hours and admission see website of the museum.

    Open Air Museum: winter Open Air Museum: ice skating Open Air Museum: 'inhabitant' Open Air Museum: sometimes overcrowded Open Air Museum: sometimes really cold
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Apeldoorn - Apenheul, walking between monkeys

    by vtveen Written Nov 17, 2014

    It was already a long time ago since my last visit to the Apenheul, the primate park in Apeldoorn. I really have to admit that there have been a lot of changes within the Apenheul and I almost did not recognise it. The setting in the middle of the woods of ‘Park Berg en Bos’ is amazing with bamboo bushes, lots of flowers and everywhere small streams and ponds. Sometimes I felt walking in the ‘rain forest’ (perhaps because it rained cats and dogs during the day of my visit).

    Absolutely highlight of the Apenheul is the fact that many of the monkeys are allowed to mingle with the visitors. And it is so fascinating seeing them running, playing, fighting, eating so close to you.
    Specially the feedings are worth visiting (at the entrance of the ‘zoo’ you get a leaflet with a schedule of these feedings). Other groups are living on large islands surrounded by water.
    There are almost 30 species of primates in Apenheul among them gorilla’s, urang utan's, barbary macaques, sifakas, gibbons, bonobos and squirrel monkeys.

    Apenheul: entrance Apenheul: barbary macaque with her baby Apenheul: primates mingling with visitors Apenheul: gorillas on their island
    Related to:
    • Zoo

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    Apeldoorn - Paleis Het Loo, a must see sight

    by vtveen Written Nov 17, 2014

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    ‘Paleis Het Loo’ was built in 1686 by Stadtholder William III and used for almost 300 years as a (summer) palace by members of our Royal family. Queen Wilhelmina lived here till the year of 1972. After a huge restoration palace and gardens are back in their original state. Since 1984 ‘Paleis Het Loo’ is a national museum and open for public.

    Roughly there are four parts of the museum, which can be visited:
    - Just behind the ticket booth are the Stables and Coach Houses with (royal) carriages and old cars. In one part of the building is a yearly changing exposition. There is also a Grand Café 'Prins Hendrik Garage'.
    TIP: this part of the palace can be visited free of charge !

    - Two wings of the palace: the East Wing with an art collection and the Museum of the Chancery of the Netherlands Orders of Knighthood and an art collection (open from 13.00 hours). The West Wing always offers temporary exhibitions.

    - The main building with lots of rooms to visit (guided, audiotour or unguided). Rooms are decorated with original furniture, china, portraits, court-dresses and so on. They display the lives of the members of the House of Orange-Nassau, especially the members of the Dutch royal family who lived in the palace. In the main building is another café and the museum shop with unique ‘royal’ gifts.

    - The gardens; here you will understand why ‘Paleis Het Loo’ is called ‘Versailles of the North’.

    Be aware you will have to do a lot of walking when visiting the palace. From the car park through the palace to the end of the Upper Garden will be a couple of km’s !!

    Special Events
    - "Winterpaleis": with "Christmas at the Palace Het Loo", an ice rink and some special evening openinghours (see for more info website: 'Tentoonstellingen, nieuws en evenementen').
    - A Royal View over the gardens: the roof of the palace is open for public on Easter, Queensday, Whit Sunday and Monday and on Wednesday’s in June, July and August;
    - Monthly concert: every last Friday in the Ballroom of the palace (see for more information www.paleisconcerten.nl).

    Openinghours and admission: see website (Dutch, English, French and German).

    If you have some spare time also visit the three nearby monuments: The Man with Two Hats (Canadian Liberation Monument), Queen's Day Attack Monument and 'De Naald'.

    Palace Het Loo Gardens seen from the roof of the palace Lower Garden Upper Garden (New) entrance building with ticket office
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

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    Zutphen - Librije: a hidden gem

    by vtveen Updated Nov 17, 2014

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    The ‘Librije’ is a unique 16th century public library in Zutphen and a REAL hidden gem:
    - it is hardly known by others than citizens of Zutphen
    - it is more or less hidden as ‘a part’ of the St. Walburga’s Church and even in the church the entrance is through a simple inconspicuous door.

    The public library was founded as a stronghold against the popularity of the Reformation around 1550. Two church-elders planned this reading room, convinced that people by reading the right books, they would be cured of their errors and become true believers of the Roman Catholic faith. The building of the ’Librije’ started in the year of 1561 and took three years to complete.
    The ‘Librije’ is one of the most important cultural monuments in the Netherlands and abroad, because there are only two other similar libraries: one in Italy (Cesena) and in Britain (Hereford).

    The interior of the reading room with its desks and beautiful decorated pillars didn’t change since the old days. Also the books are original ones and dating back to the 15th and 16th century. Many of the 300 books in the room are chained to the ‘lecterns’ and some newer ones (17th century) are in a bookcase.

    The ‘Librije’ is open for visitors during ‘summer season’ (couldn’t find exact information, but was told so during my visit) and special events. Entrance fee is € 4,00 (November 2014) for adults; which means a guided tour in the library and church. In the church is a small exhibition (text only in Dutch) about the library and art of printing and a booth selling postcards and books. There are leaflets in different languages.
    For opening hours better check their website > “Openingstijden”

    It is not allowed to take pictures inside the ‘Librije’, so I can not show you too much.

    Librije: reading room Part of the exhibition in the church Entrance to the St. Walburgiskerk en Librije
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Kootwijkerzand - shifting-sand

    by vtveen Updated Aug 20, 2013

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    This part of the Veluwe has an unique scenery with the biggest shifting-sand area of Europe. Surrounded by forests and just close to the very small village of Kootwijk, it is one of the most remote parts of the Netherlands. Therefore it is such a pity that tourist facilities, like camping sites and holiday parks are coming closer and closer to this unique spot.

    The only way to explore “Kootwijkerzand” is to walk. Personally we prefer to stroll around without using paths. It is such an amazing landscape, sometimes the sand is almost white, other parts are covered by moss or small pines. And always the sand is drifting in the wind and the landscape is constantly changing. Sometimes it seems to be a little Sahara, specially when temperatures in the sun reach 50 degrees Celsius !!

    If you don’t like to walk, just find a nice spot on one of the hills (they are called a ‘fort’) and just sit down and look around, see the living skies and enjoy this beautiful scenery.

    Kootwijk is within easy reach of the highway between Amersfoort and Apeldoorn. In the village turn left on the (only) junction; follow “Kerkendelweg” and turn right into “Houtzagersweg”. At the end of the sealed road is a car park. Go through a small gate and walk for about 500 metres straight on. Suddenly you will reach this huge sandbox. Stroll around, but just take care you don’t get lost and can not find your way out !!

    (on the road between Kootwijk and Harskamp is a car park with a short sign posted track, but we don’t like that part too much, because it is ‘overcrowded’).

    Directions: www.viamichelin.com

    Sand hills everywhere North Sea coast, Sahara......no Kootwijkerzand living skies one tree left the scenery is always changing
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    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Zaltbommel: more than ‘gutter ghosts’

    by vtveen Written Oct 25, 2012

    Zaltbommel is quite an old city: dating back to 850 AD, at which time it was a small settlement, called “Bomela”. In 1231 the settlement was given municipal rights by Count Otto II van Gelre. The ramparts and fortifications of the town date back to those days.

    Zaltbommel is located in the province of Gelderland and although I live in the same province it didn’t feel like ‘my’ province when visiting. It is quite different from the other parts and does look more like Brabant.

    As very often we made a town walk through the old part – surrounded by the former ramparts and the river Waal – of the city. We started our walk at the city hall, where you also will find the tourist information center (TRIP). We bought a small leaflet ‘Wandelroute’, which is also available in English and German.

    During our walk of about 1 1/2hours we did see a lot of interesting buildings and other things:
    - the city hall from the 18 th century
    - - a lot of old houses, among them the oldest of Zaltbommel from the year of 1400.
    - lots of nice and interesting details on houses and doors
    - several so called ‘gutter ghosts’ (gootspoken)
    - the city castle (open from 13.00 – 17.00 hours; closed on Monday)
    - St. Maartens Church with its 70 meters high tower (for visiting hours better ask the tourist office)
    - the quaint church square with the Gouverneurshuis (1550)
    - Waterpoort, the only remaining g city gate of Zaltbommel
    - the former fish market
    - the promenade along the river Waal
    - the old ramparts and moat
    - and much more ….

    When walking around you will pass a lot of local owned shops and cafes and restaurants for a bite or a drink.

    Zaltbommel: gutter ghost Zaltbommel: city hall Zaltbommel: entrance to the city castle Zaltbommel: Waterpoort (Water Gate) Zaltbommel: St. Maartens Church
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Groenlo, walking in a fortified city

    by vtveen Updated Nov 11, 2011

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    The Netherlands has quite a lot of fortified cities. Some of them are well known (mostly located in the western part of the country), but there is one which is more or less unknown as such.
    That is the city of Groenlo in the eastern part of the Netherlands (close to Germany).

    Groenlo – which has been known through the centuries as Groonloo, Gronlo and Grol – was founded around the year 610 and was awarded city rights in 1277. The city is mainly famous for its illustrious history. It played a prominent role in the Eighty Year War between the Netherlands and Spain. In 1627 the battle for Grol, fought between the troops of Prince Frederik Henrik and the Spanish, put the town at the centre of the action.

    The best way to explore the history of this fortified city is to walk around or even better by following a signposted walk through the town. Best thing is to get the brochure ‘Vestingstad Wandeling’ at the local VVV-office (Mattelierstraat). During my last visit - July 2011 – they didn’t have information in English, but the brochure has a map. The VVV-building houses also the City Museum, a good start for your visit.

    The walk brings you to the ramparts (with replica cannons), bulwarks and the city moat, but also to all other interesting historical sights in Groenlo;
    - Old Calixtus Church: the oldest building in town
    - City farm (dating back from the 17th century)
    - Calixtus Church, with an interesting interior
    - City Hall from the 16th century
    - Market Square
    - Brouwery De Klok, ‘birthplace’ of the famous Dutch Grolsch Beer.

    Opening hours
    For opening hours of the Tourist Information (VVV) office in Groenlo, see:
    http://www.vvvoostgelre.nl/bekijk_op_google_maps/vvvs/oost_gelre/

    Groenlo - cannon on a rampart Groenlo - moat Groenlo - city farm Groenlo - market square Groenlo - Calixtus Church, altar
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

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    Kröller-Müller Museum

    by RusskiPower Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Superlative modern art museum near the village of Otterlo, Gelderland Province.

    It houses a stellar Vincent Van Gogh collection, with 93 paintings and 183 drawings, plus superb works by Seurat, Monet, Gauguin, Picasso, Gris, Courbet, Corot, Millet, Mondrian.

    To top it off, it is located in the centre of the National Park De Hoge Veluwe, the original royal hunting grounds.

    More pictures here: Culture-Vulture And Gourmet Drives On 3 Continents

    St. Hubertusslot by Berlage
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    • Museum Visits

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    Ooijpolder – fascinating Dutch landscape

    by vtveen Updated Dec 23, 2010

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    Although most of the polders are in the western part of the country, the Ooijpolder (and some other polders) are stretching from Nijmegen till the German town of Emmerich. On one side surrounded by the rivers Waal and Rhine and on the ‘land’ side by the hills of ‘Beek’ and ‘Ubbergen’.

    We started our biketour at the so called Hollandsch-Duitsch Gemaal. This pumping-station was built in 1933 and is still responsible for draining away the water from the German polders into the river Waal.
    Our route follows the signs (ANWB) of the ‘Ooij route’ and it was very easy to find our way.

    Main parts of the trip we were biking on the dikes, which meant we had great views of the beautiful scenery of meadows, agricultural land, orchards and wetlands with the typical willows. But most impressive are the numerous ponds, pools, small canals and the river Rhine and Waal with everywhere a lot of water birds.
    In the small village of Kekerdom we followed the signs to the ‘Millinger Theetuin’ and entered the nature park of the Millingerwaard with swamps, wetlands and river dunes. The track is unsealed and sometimes rather bad. You might encounter Polish Konik horses and Scottish Galloway cows.
    Follow the bike track along the river Waal and you will see the ‘Ooij route’ signs again, which we followed back to our car.

    We passed some remnants of the IJssel Linie (old line of defence dating back from the Cold War), several dike houses and a couple of quaint old villages. Before heading to Ooij make a detour to the ‘old’ church and the remnants of Castle Ooij (dating back to 1184). Persingen, almost at the end of the route, is supposed to be the smallest village of the Netherlands with a church (15th century), a former guesthouse ‘de Bonte Os’ and a couple of houses.

    This bike tour is 48 km’s long and with a couple of stops an ideal day trip through a really fascinating Dutch landscape.

    Ooijpolder - water everywhere Ooij - remnants of Castle Ooij Ooijpolder - along the bike track Ooijpolder - Persingen, smallest village Ooijpolder - Hollandsch-Duitsch Gemaal
    Related to:
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    Acquoy

    by OlafS Updated Nov 4, 2004

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    Acquoy is a tiny village with a tiny church. There is little that reminds of the time that it was a barony. That's long ago, and baron of Acquoy, or better: baroness, is nothing more than one of the many titles of the queen.

    The village is nice, with cute old houses standing on a dyke and orchards wherever you look. In Spring this must be a lovely place. The most important sight however is the tower of the church. If you want to see a leaning tower and don't want to go to Pisa, here is one. It was built so badly that it was never finished. The original church was destroyed in a storm in 1674.

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    Nijmegen

    by OlafS Written Nov 2, 2004

    Nijmegen is the oldest city of The Netherlands (and NOT the oldest of Holland, as some people will suggest), but unfortunately proof of this can only be seen in a museum. War and post-war reconstruction have taken a huge toll of the city, but there are a few very nice spots, like the Valkenbergpark, where you can see the remnants of German emperor Barbarossa's castle.

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    Arnhem

    by OlafS Written Nov 2, 2004

    The provincial capital is well known world wide for the battle that took place here in September 1944. During the war much of the town was destroyed, and reconstruction afterwards resulted in some really ugly buildings. See my page about Arnhem to see what I have to say about it.

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    Tiel

    by OlafS Written Nov 2, 2004

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    My birthplace. Perhaps quite a boring place if you have to live there for your entire life, but I escaped when I was 20 and therefore I still like it. Much of the town was destroyed in the closing months of World War Two, but there are still a few old buildings left, like the church of St. Maarten. You'll also find a museum here about the fruit processing industry that once was very important here.

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Provincie Gelderland Hotels

  • NH Rijnhotel

    10 Onderlangs, Arnhem, Gelderland, NL 6812 CG, The Netherlands

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Couples

    Hotel Class 4 out of 5 stars

  • Manna

    Oranjesingel 2c, Nijmegen, 6511 NS, The Netherlands

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Solo

  • Van der Valk Hotel Apeldoorn - de...

    Van Golsteinlaan 20, Ugchelen, Apeldoorn, 7339 GT, The Netherlands

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Families

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