Fun things to do in Groningen

  • Martini church, Groningen
    Martini church, Groningen
    by ATLC
  • Martini church, Groningen
    Martini church, Groningen
    by ATLC
  • Martini church, Groningen
    Martini church, Groningen
    by ATLC

Most Viewed Things to Do in Groningen

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    Martinikerk and Martinitoren

    by vtveen Updated Mar 5, 2014

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    The tower of the church - Martinitoren – is with its height of 97 metres the most well known and remarkable landmark of the city. It can be seen from almost everywhere in town and will lead you (together with the signposts) to the main square ‘Grote Markt’.

    Church
    The church got its name from Sint Martinus or Sint Maarten (Saint Martin) and still some murals of him as well as others can be seen in the choir of the church. These beautiful paintings are dating back to the year of 1545. The ceiling has a warm blue colour.
    The nave of the church is really impressive and has one of the biggest baroque organs in northern Europe. The construction of this organ started already in 1480 and was finished in the 19th century. In 1984 the organ was restored.

    The church is still used for services, but nowadays also can be rented for different events.
    The church can be visited; for opening hours and admisssion fee see their website.

    Martinitoren
    Originally the church had an indoor tower, but after it collapsed a new tower was built (between 1470 and 1550) west of the main church. This tower became the landmark of Groningen. The people of Groningen call it ‘d'Olle Grieze’ (Old Grey One) after the colour of the bricks.
    Due to some accidents we couldn’t visit the tower, but I have read it is open again for visitors. Be aware there is no elevator, so you have to climb a lot of stairs to the viewing platforms.

    If you want to visit the tower you have to buy your ticket at the Tourist Information Centre, just opposite the street. For opening hours see the website of the Martinikerk or ask the Tourist Information Centre (0900 202 30 50).

    Groningen: Martinitoren Groningen: Martinikerk - 'Schnitger organ' Groningen: photo Martinikerk
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    Lunch concert at De Oosterpoort

    by Nemorino Updated Sep 10, 2012

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    There’s no such thing as a free lunch, but there is such a thing as a free lunch concert, not only at the opera house in Lyon and the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, but also at De Oosterpoort in Groningen.

    The musicians in the first photo are Anne-Elise Thouvenin, a French cellist from Nîmes (you can hear her playing her cello if you click on the link), and Rolinka Niers, a Dutch clarinetist.

    At the time, they were both finishing up their studies at the Prince Claus Conservatory in Groningen.

    Unfortunately I didn’t get a photo of their colleague Romana Porumb, a Romanian violinist who was also doing advanced studies at the Prince Claus Conservatory.

    Next: Hoge de A

    The musicians People arriving for the concert
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    Hoge der A

    by Nemorino Updated Sep 1, 2012

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    This is the sort of place where you snap a picture of it first and then look to see what it is.

    The name, Hoge der A, is rather mysterious, but it turns out that “A” is the name of the river (sometimes spelled “Aa”), and that Hoge means high.

    On the other side of the river there is a street called Lage der A (Lage meaning low), and there is also a church of the A somewhere nearby.

    Starting in the 12th century, this was the commercial harbor where wealthy merchants lived and had their warehouses. Some of the picturesque old warehouses still exist (over two hundred of them, supposedly), but most of them are now used as residences.

    Next: Northern Maritime Museum

    Hoge der A Hoge der A
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    De Oosterpoort concert hall

    by Nemorino Written Sep 1, 2012

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    Groningen does not have an opera house, but it does have a modern, state-of-the-art concert hall called De Oosterpoort, which is a major venue for all sorts of music, from classical to rock.

    Besides the large concert hall, there are also two smaller auditoriums and a cultural center in the same complex.

    The name Oosterpoort does not mean that there used to be a port here, as I naively thought when I first saw the word. What it really means is “East Gate”. In former times there was a large stone gateway on this site, as part of the city walls.

    Next: St. Matthew Passion at De Oosterpoort

    Riding past the concert hall De Oosterpoort concert hall In the lobby Riding past the concert hall
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    St. Matthew Passion at De Oosterpoort

    by Nemorino Updated Aug 29, 2012

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    Since I was in Groningen on Good Friday (not that I had planned it that way), I had my choice of two different performances of the St. Matthew Passion by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750), one at the New Church and one at De Oosterpoort.

    Actually I could have seen them both, because one was in the afternoon and one in the evening. But I decided one was enough, so I went to the one in the evening at De Oosterpoort. The concert was sold out, but I was second on the waiting list, so as people started coming in I simply loitered around near the cash desk by some beautiful white orchids. Soon two ladies came along with three tickets, since their friend was sick and couldn’t come. So I bought their third ticket from them for € 35, which is what they had paid for it, and had an excellent seat in the middle of the sixth row.

    This was the first time I had seen a full performance of the St. Matthew Passion (because as a Sunday School dropout I tend to prefer secular music when I have a choice), but I must say I was very impressed. Bach composed the Passion for a double choir and a double orchestra, and sure enough, the right half of the orchestra was a mirror image of the left, meaning there were oboes on both sides, flutes on both sides, etc.

    But the ones on the left got to play all the really brilliant solo parts, so the two orchestras weren’t equally weighted after all.

    There were six solo singers: The Evangelist (a tenor), Christus (a baritone) and four others who were simply called Soprano, Contralto, Tenor and Bass. These last four also took on various roles such as Judas (the bass), Peter, Pontius Pilate and various priests and maids. They all had beautiful arias and duets to sing, just as in an opera – all except the Evangelist, who sang the narration as a sort of recitative.

    Sometimes the Evangelist had a long paragraph of narration to sing, but sometimes only two to four words, such as “They said” or “Jesus spoke to him”. I think those must have been the hardest parts.

    They sang in the original German, but the program booklet had a parallel translation into Dutch so people could follow along. The German pronunciation of the singers was excellent, even though only one of them was German.

    I also thought the orchestra was very good. It was the Noord Nederlands Orkest (North Netherlands Orchestra) conducted by Geert-Jan van Beijeren Bergen en Henegouwen.

    (For more on Johann Sebastian Bach, please have a look at my tips on his birth house in Eisenach and his statue in Leipzig.)

    Next: Lunch concert at De Oosterpoort

    In the concert hall In the intermission In the concert hall Program booklet with text in German and Dutch
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    University Museum

    by Nemorino Written Aug 26, 2012

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    The University Museum describes itself as a “Museum of man, nature and science”.

    The entrance is somewhat inconspicuous (first photo), in a narrow passageway between two buildings. In the courtyard of one of the traditional university buildings that have built a modern addition (second photo) which serves as the entrance hall and is also used for temporary exhibitions. When I was there they had an interesting exhibit on modern aboriginal art of Australia.

    When you go upstairs and into the old building you get to the Geology Hall (third and fourth photos), which has intentionally been preserved as a traditional museum with old-fashioned wooden display cases to emphasize the four-hundred year history of the university.

    The older part of the museum also includes the consulting room of Dr. Aletta Jacobs (1854 - 1929), who was the first female student in the Netherlands, the first female physician and the first woman to obtain a doctorate. The room includes her desk (fifth photo) and other personal objects, as well as information on her campaigns to improve the conditions of working class women, her birth control clinic, her involvement in the international Women’s Peace Party and her campaigns to give women the right to vote.

    Next: Grafisch Museum

    Entrance to the University Museum New and old museum buildings Geology Hall Geology Hall Desk of Dr. Aletta Jacobs
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    Grafisch Museum

    by Nemorino Written Aug 26, 2012

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    This is the least expensive museum in Groningen, but in my opinion one of the most interesting.

    Because of my advanced age I only had to pay € 3.75 for admission in 2012. You younger folks have to pay € 4.75, but that is still a very reasonable price.

    The museum has an impressive collection of historical printing presses from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including some that were driven by steam power (second photo). A steam engine turned a large revolving rod that hung from the ceiling, and the force from this revolving rod was transmitted to the machines by means of long transmission belts. (Old mills using water power often used a similar arrangement.)

    Typesetting in those days was usually done by hand. The letters were made of lead and the typesetter was a skilled worker who chose one letter at a time from a tray or drawer and placed it in its proper position. But the museum also has some examples of early typesetting machines (fifth photo).

    The printed explanations are only in Dutch, but there are also numerous photos and diagrams to help visitors understand how the machines were used.

    The Grafisch Museum is not in the city center but is still very easy to reach because it is right behind the central railroad station.

    Next: The Groninger Museum

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    VVV Tourist information

    by Nemorino Written Aug 25, 2012

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    The Tourist Information (which in the Netherlands is always called the VVV) is a rather gaudy little building on Grote Markt. They have numerous publications and souvenirs for sale, but not much to give away. Even a small map of the city, which would be free in most places, cost € 1.95 here. (It was a useful map, however, so I think I got my money’s worth.)

    The only thing they gave me for free was a weekly folder of things that were going on in Groningen. In fact they gave me two of them, because I arrived on a Wednesday, and these folders give the theater, cinema and concert listings for the week from Thursday to Wednesday. Of course the theater listings didn’t help me because I understand too little Dutch, but I did find about concerts and such through these listings.

    There is one really nice thing about the tourist information, however, and that is that on one side there are lots of wooden steps going up to an observation platform on the roof. Lots of people climb up to take a look (I took the second, third, fourth and fifth photos from up there) and the local teenagers spend hours sitting on the stairs. Since there aren’t any other decent stairs to sit on in Groningen, the building fills a real need, because of course all teenagers like to sit on stairs.

    Next: De Pronkjewail

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    De Pronkjewail

    by Nemorino Updated Aug 25, 2012

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    All you loyal readers of my Bruchsal page (thanks again to both of you) will recall that I have a thing about old-timey mechanical musical instruments such as our great-grandparents used to listen to.

    So I was glad to see (and hear!) that Groningen has a genuine authentic (and loud!) mechanical street organ called De Pronkjewail. Whenever there is any kind of festival in Groningen, De Pronkjewail is bound to be there.

    You can hear it here.

    You can see and hear it here. Note the people going past on bicycles in the background.


    Next: Annual Flower Market (Bloemenjaarmarkt)

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    Annual Flower Market (Bloemenjaarmarkt)

    by Nemorino Written Aug 25, 2012

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    If you happen to be in Groningen on Good Friday (as I just happened to be, but some people plan it that way), by all means go to the Annual Flower Market (Bloemenjaarmarkt) at the Grote Markt in front of the City Hall (Stadhuis).

    The center of Groningen is really full on that day. People who live in Groningen come in by bicycle, of course, but people from outlying regions tend to drive in by car, park in one of the parking lots or garages at the edge of town and come in by shuttle bus. So there are big shuttle buses constantly running back and forth. I don’t think anyone had to wait for more than two or three minutes for a bus to come.

    I took the first three photos from the roof of the tourist information office.

    Next: Canals

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    Canals

    by Nemorino Written Aug 25, 2012

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    Like any other self-respecting city in the Netherlands, Groningen has lots of canals and bridges.

    The first photo is one that I took from the Hampshire Hotel, not from my room but from the other side, looking northeast at the Oosterhavn and Eemskanaal. (I love the way they spell Oost with two Os and Kanaal with three As.)

    The Trompbrug (second photo) is a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the Verbindungskanaal. By way of this bridge it was barely five minutes by bicycle from my hotel to the concert hall.

    Next: Children in Groningen

    Oosterhavn and Eemskanaal Trompbrug Verbindungskanaal by the concert hall Barge and houseboat on the Verbindungskanaal

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    Groningen - city walk(s)

    by vtveen Updated May 30, 2012

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    The best way to discover Groningen is making a city walk. The Tourist Information Centre (Grote Markt 25, opposite the Martinitoren) has a leaflet with two walks for just € 1,50.

    These ‘walks’ brought us to the highlights of the city like the Martinitoren and Church and the market squares - lined with old houses and buildings, but also to a lot of hidden gems, which we hadn’t seen otherwise. A couple of the most interesting sights along the route:
    -‘Prinsenhoftuin’: a rose and herb garden, dating from 1625.
    - ‘Nieuwe Kerk’; this church was built in 1664 and is surrounded by a nice park.
    - Academic Buildings: the oldest part of the university, inaugurated in 1909. I think we never have seen so many bicycles together as in front of these university buildings.
    - Canals ‘Lage der A’ and ‘Hoge der A’: with former warehouses, most of them are now apartments.
    - a very modern urinal.
    - ‘Aa-Kerk : dating from the 15th century wit a very remarkable tower.
    - Alms- and orphan houses: always hidden behind a gate
    - Railway station: a building with ‘jugendstil’ and ‘renaissance’ elements; especially the interior of the main hall is worth a visit.
    And many many more …

    On our way there was time enough for a cup of coffee, having a lunch or to do some shopping. We passed also a lot of museums and it is no problem at all to spend a whole day in this most northern city of the Netherlands.

    Groningen: city walk north Groningen: city walk south
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    Country side When...

    by nighthawk Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    When travelling through Groningen, one should hire a canoe and make a trip through the canals, locally known as 'maren'. You can really see how beautiful the countryside of Groningen is when canoeing. The peace and quite you will find here is unique.

    Countryside Garrelsweer
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    'Nieuwe Kerk' ... is an old one

    by vtveen Updated Nov 27, 2010

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    The Nieuwe Kerk (New Church) was built just after the Reformation in the Netherlands (1660 – 1665) on a new development north of the ‘old’ city. As usual in these days the church was surrounded by a graveyard; now a nice green oasis in the city. The address is still Nieuwe Kerkhof (New Graveyard).

    Architect Coenraet Roelofs was inspired by the ‘Noorderkerk’ in Amsterdam, the most well known protestant church in its time. It is a so called ‘cross church’, which does have the shape of a cross. In the ‘armpits’ were houses of a police officer, the sexton and the gravedigger. One of these ‘buildings’ is now the main entrance with a plaque and some very nice stuccowork above the door.

    It was a pity we couldn’t visit the interior of this impressive church. As far as I know the church is not open for the public (except for special occasions). You may find some nice pictures on the website of the church:
    http://www.nieuwekerk.org/foto_s/gebouw/gebouw.html

    Groningen: Nieuwe Kerk (New Church) Nieuwe Kerk: a house in a armpit of the church Nieuwe Kerk: plaque above the entrance Nieuwe Kerk: stuccowork
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    Prinsentuin - hidden gem

    by vtveen Updated Nov 27, 2010

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    The ‘Prinsentuin’ (or ‘Prinsenhoftuin’) is the garden, which belonged to the ‘Prinsenhof’. It dates back from the year of 1625 and is now considered as one of the most authentic Renaissance gardens in the Netherlands.

    This walled garden has nice rose and herb gardens, as well as a small orchard with some old fruit tree varieties. One part of the garden has some nice shady ‘berceaus’. Above the entrance gate – at the inside of the garden - is a beautiful sundial.

    Depending of the weather the ‘tearoom’ in the garden is open; but we were lucky and could enjoy this unexpected hidden gem having a nice cup of tea.

    The ‘Prinsentuin’ is open daily and is free of charge.

    Groningen: Prinsentuin Prinsentuin - flowerbeds seen from the 'berceaus��� Prinsentuin: roses Prinsentuin: sundial Prinsentuin: walking along the rosesl
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