Martinikerk - Martini Church, Groningen

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  • Martini church, Groningen
    Martini church, Groningen
    by ATLC
  • Martini church, Groningen
    Martini church, Groningen
    by ATLC
  • Martini church, Groningen
    Martini church, Groningen
    by ATLC
  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Martini church

    by ATLC Written May 8, 2013
    Martini church, Groningen
    4 more images

    Quickly popped into the Martini church whose tower (Martini tower) is a landmark that can be seen from outside Groningen.
    They ask a 2.50 euro contribution per person (just for the church) but strictly speaking it is not an entrance fee.

    Mind you, here is one of the finest and oldest Dutch church organs in the country! Some of its parts are even from before 1450 AD.
    It may be a good idea to visit one of the concerts. There is a free and rather portly brochure to be had, if you're interested.

    Here is an impression of the church in photo's.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Music
    • Architecture

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  • slothtraveller's Profile Photo

    Martinikerk

    by slothtraveller Written Jun 13, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Martinikerk

    The number one sight to see in Groningen is undoubtedly the Martini church tower. The tower is the fourth highest in the Netherlands and can be seen from afar. The church itself is around 800 years old and houses one of the largest Baroque organs in northwest Europe.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Sprucebeer's Profile Photo

    Martinikerk

    by Sprucebeer Written Jan 30, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Martinikerk on 1616 map

    The History of the Martini Church and Tower begins in ninth century, around the year 800 as a wooden church. It has undergone many changes starting in the 13th century when a brick roman style church was built. Between 1415 and 1425 the current church choir was created. After that an indoor tower was built.

    Inside the Church you will find beautiful murals and alcove paintings. The Church organ, built by Arp Schnitger, is considered among the most renowned baroque organs in the world.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Martinikerk

    by tompt Written Sep 8, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    frescos in the Martinichurch

    The Martinikerk is the church adjacent to the Martinitoren. It was originally a romanogotic crosschurch from ±1230. The choir was built in 1430 and is much higher then the rest of the church. The church has some frescos from the 13th century.The organ, built by Arp Schnitger, is one of the biggest in europe. The Martini church has its name from Saint Martin.

    For a small entrance fee (1 Euro) you can go inside and see the beautifull paintings. Open easter to 11 november: tuesday-friday: 12.00-17.00. A guided tour starts at 13.30 each day when the church is open

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    • Religious Travel

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  • martin_nl's Profile Photo

    Martini Kerk

    by martin_nl Written Aug 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Martini Tower and church

    Right next to the Martini Tower is the Martini church. I didn't visit the church because you had to pay € 1,00 and you could see quite a lot already by just taking a quick look around the corner. What you will see directly is the beautiful organ. There are alo wall painting about the life of Jesus.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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  • OlafS's Profile Photo

    Martinikerk

    by OlafS Updated Mar 12, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Groningen: Martinikerk

    The Martini church, with its huge gothic tower, one of the tallest in the country. The church itself is an unusually big example of romano-gothicism, a style only found in the northern provinces. The gables at the sides of the church are reconstructions. You can still buy souvenirs with a picture of the church where it still has a completely different roof.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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