Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

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    Brochure detail"Rape of...
    by hquittner
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    by ostia
  • Van Gogh Museum
    by ostia
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    Beware of Blockbuster Art Exhibitions!

    by hquittner Written Sep 17, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Brochure detail

    Favorite thing: When we were there in May 2006, the Rijksmuseum and van Gogh were holding a joint show in the Exhibition Area in the lower back part of the vanGogh entitled "Rembrandt-Caravaggio". A combined ticket for all 3 was available and you had to enter the van Gogh to see the Exhibit (each advancing the cost). An audio guide was provided free (various languages). This was part of a year-long series of events to "celebrate" the 400th anniversary of Rembrandt's birth. Blockbuster Art Shows are a way for museums to make money,achieve curatorial notoriety and cement picture swapping ("loans") opportunities for more Blockbusters. They are intended to expand the viewing opportunities for the interested local suporters of the museum (most of whom are world travellers). 90% of the people who attend are barely interested in art and cling to their audioguides while ignoring the pictures and blocking your view.There was no crowd control. In other cities (eg the Grand Palais in Paris) you buy your ticket at a Ticketron for a controlled specific time of entry which lessens the crowd. The conceit of comparing the 2 great contemporary masters of chiaroscuro (who were unaware of each other and of different social environments) was "clever". It provided an opportunity to view over 15 examples of each (only a few of the Rembrandts were from the Rijks.). But it was not informative like a similar Exhibition elsewhere comparing Picasso and Matisse. Of course an expensive publication was available for those who could not see enough because of the crowd! Photography is almost never permitted at Blockbusters (and is not permitted anywhere in the van Gogh Museum). Thus museums have preserved the covetous stance toward collecting art established by their royal and aristocratic ancestors.

    Fondest memory: 17C Dutch Art and Architecture

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Van Gogh Museum

    by CoAir13 Written Feb 2, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Quotes on a Wall

    Favorite thing: This place was very special as I am a HUGE fan of the works of Van Gogh. To see so many of his pieces collected in one place was truly magical to me!! Even walking through the Museumplein was magical!!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Art Musuems

    by dragontml Written Dec 29, 2003

    Favorite thing: Amsterdam is proud of its museums. One of the most famous museums of the Netherlands is situated in Amsterdam. The Rijksmseum contains many paintings by Holland's 17th century painters, such as Vermeer, Van Hals, and Rembrandt. The famous "Nightwatch" is one of their most prized pieces. The other famous Dutch painter in van Gogh, who has a whole museum, called "the Van Gogh Museum, dedicated solely to his work.

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    Between Rieksmuseum and Van Gogh museum

    by chancay Updated Jun 19, 2003
    just a beautiful view at sunset

    Favorite thing: Van Gogh:

    "Vincent van Gogh was born near Brabant, the son of a minister. In 1869, he got a position at the art dealers, Goupil and Co. in The Hague, through his uncle, and worked with them until he was dismissed from the London office in 1873. He worked as a schoolmaster in England (1876), before training for the ministry at Amsterdam University (1877). After he failed to get a post in the Church, he went to live as an independent missionary among the Borinage miners.
    "He was largely self-taught as an artist, although he received help from his cousin, Mauve. His first works were heavily painted, mud-colored and clumsy attempts to represent the life of the poor (e.g. Potato-Eaters, 1885, Amsterdam), influenced by one of his artistic heroes, Millet. He moved to Paris in 1886, living with his devoted brother, Theo, who as a dealer introduced him to artists like Gauguin, Pissarro, Seurat and Toulouse-Lautrec. In Paris, he discovered color as well as the divisionist ideas which helped to create the distinctive dashed brushstrokes of his later work (e.g. Pere Tanguy, 1887, Paris). He moved to Arles, in the south of France, in 1888, hoping to establish an artists' colony there, and was immediately struck by the hot reds and yellows of the Mediterranean, which he increasingly used symbolically to represent his own moods (e.g. Sunflowers, 1888, London, National Gallery). He was joined briefly by Gauguin in October 1888, and managed in some works to combine his own ideas with the latter's Synthetism (e.g. The Sower, 1888, Amsterdam), but the visit was not a success. A final argument led to the infamous episode in which Van Gogh mutilated his ear.

    Fondest memory: "In 1889, he became a voluntary patient at the St. Remy asylum, where he continued to paint, often making copies of artists he admired. His palette softened to mauves and pinks, but his brushwork was increasingly agitated, the dashes constructed into swirling, twisted shapes, often seen as symbolic of his mental state (e.g. Ravine, 1889, Otterlo). He moved to Auvers, to be closer to Theo in 1890 - his last 70 days spent in a hectic program of painting. He died, having sold only one work, following a botched suicide attempt. His life is detailed in a series of letters to his brother (published 1959)."

    - From "The Bulfinch Guide to Art History"

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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    31.12.02

    by Lalique Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rare precious moments...

    Favorite thing: The begining of the end of 2002....

    Was surprised indeed.... After two days of permanent raining, it was a real present to see a bright sunshine.... was so delighted that after waking up immediately grabed my camera and took a pic from the window.... stop the moment and keep it.... :))))

    Museumplein, late morning of 31.12.02.....

    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort

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    As well as the Vondelpark,...

    by Gypsy_Saskia Written Sep 7, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: As well as the Vondelpark, Museumplein is a great chill out place. Lay in the grass and relax, grab some lunch at the supermarket underneath the square, visit the Van Gogh (also check their website: www.vangoghmuseum.nl), Rijks or Stedelijk (www.stedelijk.nl) museum or go shopping in the poshest street of AMS: the PC Hooftstraat.

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    visit the Van Gogh Museum at...

    by GUYON Written Sep 7, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: visit the Van Gogh Museum at Paulus Potterstraat 7.
    Open : 10AM - 6PM.
    Price : 15.5G.
    Audioguide in different languages

    Fondest memory: The quarter of the Van Gogh's work are here on display according to a chronologic order. We can follow the evolution of the artist between each of his period.
    See one of his paintings in travelogue.

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  • -Vincent Van Gough...

    by erica21 Updated Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: -Vincent Van Gough Museum
    -Anne Frank House

    Fondest memory: The first trip my husband and I went together was Amsterdam, so that right ther makes it something extra special for me. My husband is from the US and that was his first time visiting a major European city.
    It was just so much fun seeing him totally amazed about how different everything is compared to the US.
    I'm talking about the red light districts, the coffee shops, etc.
    But also seeing so much history, like the Anne Frank house. It sent shivers down our spines, knowing that we were actually standing in the place where she had spent some of the best years of her life, hidden away.
    Amsterdam is a great place, I promise.

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    Before everything, if you are...

    by Sarah97 Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Before everything, if you are a Gogh-lover like me absolutely Museum of Vincent van Gogh. I bought a copy of his painting 'Sunflowers.' And it is still hung on the wall at my mom's place. I like his touch especially, it's so wild, bold, passionate and powerful.

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  • See the Rijksmuseum & VanGogh...

    by rewolf Written Aug 24, 2002

    Favorite thing: See the Rijksmuseum & VanGogh museum. Take a canal tour. Sample the local weed. Cruise the red-light district. Check out the diamond wholesalers.

    Fondest memory: Hemp-hazed memory of walking the streets on a 'four season day'. It rained, snowed, warmed up like a spring day when the sun came out.

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    go_doggo's General Tip

    by go_doggo Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Fondest memory: We attended a free lunch concert at the Het Concertgebouw. These take place every Wednesday at 12:30 but get there early to get a seat! The day we went Julia Bronkhorst was singing and Henk van Lingen played classical guitar. The concert was wonderful and the Concertgebouw is beatiful! I definitely recommend you add this to your itinerary!

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    Van Gogh Museum

    by ostia Written May 9, 2005

    Favorite thing: Go to museum as often as you can - you can read this sentence in many languages on the wall of Van Gogh Museum

    Fondest memory: It can be read in Hungarian, too! Járjon többet múzeumba.

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