Anne Frank House, Amsterdam

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 241 Reviews

Prinsengracht 267 +31-20-5567100

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  • front of Anne Frank house
    front of Anne Frank house
    by jlynyc
  • Anne Frank House from across the street
    Anne Frank House from across the street
    by monica71
  • Statue of Anne Frank near the Anne Frank Huis.
    Statue of Anne Frank near the Anne Frank...
    by zadunajska8
  • The Anne Frank Memorial Statue

    by Mariajoy Written Apr 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Her story will live on forever
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    Just around the corner from the Anne Frank House, on the Westermarkt, is a a very sweet statue (by Mari Andriessen) of the little Jewish girl who lived in the Secret Annex until her family were found and she died at Bergen-Belsen, 3 months before her 16th birthday.
    On the day that I visited there were an elderly gentleman and his grandaughter (greatgrandaughter??) - she was looking intently at the statue and listening to his explanation... it was for me one of the most moving moments of all my visits to Amsterdam.

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    Anne Frank's House

    by Rachael71 Updated Aug 12, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Anne Frank House and Museum

    More VT tips are written about Anne Frank's House than any other attraction in Amsterdam, and with good reason. It's an extraordinary monument, not just to Anne, but to the millions of people who suffered under the Nazi regime.

    Upon entering the museum, you pass through an interesting exhibition about Anne and the others who were in hiding with her, before reaching the rooms in which they lived for several years. Anne's own room still has the pictures of film stars that she pasted to the walls. The museum is so busy and bustling that it is difficult to experience the same silence that they must have had to bear day after day - I imagine that if you were there on a quiet day it would be quite eerie.

    It's an extremely moving place to visit, compounded by the additional exhibition at the end of the museum that reminds us that even today people all over the world are experiencing the same prejudices and victimisation as Anne and her family did more than 60 years ago.

    A tip - if you are visiting in the summer, go to the house in the early evening. It is open until 8pm, and the queues don't snake around the block as they do during the day.

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    Anne Frank House

    by malianrob Updated Nov 24, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    No trip can be complete to Amsterdam unless you have seen the Anne Frank house. I remember reading the book when I was a little girl so it had special meaning to me. It was like having read the book then coming here made it the more real to me. It was even alittle emotional. You cant take pictures in here but at the end of the tour there is a bookstore where you can purchase postcards of all the pictures you might have wanted to take. The post cards are about 1 euro each.
    Here you can see pictures of Anne Frank and her family. There are also video clips of the father Otto Frank and other people who worked with, were in concentration camps, or knew either Anne frank or her family. The video clips of Otto Frank I found the most emotional. You can take a self guided tour of the house, see the bookcase that hid the entranceto their hiding place and see Anne Franks room. There are also pictures of what the place looked like back then. I think this place is a must see. You dont have to be Jewish to appreciate or to get emotional about what happened here.
    Get here very early or very late to avoid the crowds. We came in November around 10am. We walked from the hotel we stayed at andthere was no line at all.

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    Anne Frank House

    by zadunajska8 Written Jan 15, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of Anne Frank near the Anne Frank Huis.

    We found the Anne Frank house to be quite a moving experience if you know the story of this poor girl and her family. The place does have a rather somber atmosphere as one should probably expect considring the subject matter, so perhaps more people should consider this when bringing children here if they can't keep them under control.
    The entrance isn't included in the "I amsterdam" card and so it was one of only two entrance fees we had to pay during our visit to the city but it is something you must see if visiting Amsterdam.
    We had been tipped off that we needed to go either very early to be there ready for opening at 9am or late after 7pm (it's open until 9pm) to avoid long queues. We went early and got in fairly quick but the place then started to fill up quickly and as it is, by it's very nature, a small space it soon got quite crowded in parts. The queue when we came out at about 10.30 was shocking! Down the road, round the corner, down that road and round the next corner!

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    Anne Franks House

    by mallyak Written Sep 7, 2008

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    as seen from  the canal.
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    The Anne Frank House is a museum where visitors are given the opportunity to personally envision what happened on this very spot.
    The rooms of the Secret Annex have been maintained in their authentic state thanks to conscientious preservation activities. The rooms in the Secret Annex are empty, because the furniture was carted away directly after the arrest. Salvaged documents and objects belonging to the eight people in hiding are now displayed in the Secret Annex.

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    Anne Frank museum

    by jo104 Updated Aug 12, 2009

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    No-one should leave Amsterdam without a visit to the house where Anne Frank and her family hid from the Nazi’s for 25 months, from 6 July 1942 to 4 August 1944.

    The first translation of “The Secret Annex” appeared in Dutch in 1947 and since then the book Anne Franks diary has been translated into more than 60 languages.
    The original diary is on display in the museum.

    I first read this young girl's diary as part of my school cirriculum. The feeling I felt when being inside the secret annex was one of sadness, how brave she was in the face of adversity and terror. Her father Otto Frank survived Auschwitz of the 8 people that were in hiding.

    Be advised there are very long queues so get her early or later in the day. Also bear in mind that you are not allowed to take photographs inside the museum. It does get exceptionally busy inside and you are asked to pass through the house in a respectfull manner.

    As at 2009 Aduts E8 Children 10-17 E4 tour lasts approx an hour no guided tours. There is limited disabled access. The information is posted in English and dutch. No discount for I-amsterdam card or museumkaart
    Opening times winter months 9am - 7pm summer 9am - 10am

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  • The Anne Frank House

    by Mariajoy Updated Feb 19, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Anne Frank House

    Having read the diary at school and again more recently, I knew this was one place I wanted to see. I found it to be a deeply moving experience. We went on a chilly winter morning - there were no queues. If you haven't read the book I suggest that you do before you visit.

    We paid 6.50E entry.

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    anne frankhuis

    by doug48 Updated Aug 24, 2006

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    door to secret annex
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    between 1942 and 1944 two jewish families, the franks and the van daans hid in the attic of this house from the nazis. 13 year old anne frank wrote a diary about her life in hiding. in 1944 they were discovered by the nazis and sent to concentration camps. anne's father otto frank was the only one to survive the war. anne franks diary was published by her father and has sold millions of copies. a sign in the house states that this is just one of six million stories. a disturbing but historically important place to visit.

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    The number one Amsterdam tourist attraction

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    Anne Frank House - Amsterdam
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    The Anne Frank House is Amsterdam's number one tourist attraction. As such each day a long line of visitors is waiting to get inside. If you want to avoid that line be early (8.45AM) or visit the house in the evening in the Summer period.

    The Anne Frank House with its "Achterhuis" is the place where Anne Frank and her family hide from the Germans during World War II.

    Annelies Marie Frank was born at 12 juni 1929 at Frankfurt am Main-Germany. She is the second daughter of Otto Frank and Edith Frank-Holländer. Her sister is Margot who is three years older. Otto works at a bank owned by the Frank family.
    In 1933 the NDSAP with Adolf Hitler as its leader comes to power and the discrimination of Jews starts. Otto starts a company in the Netherlands and Edith looks for a house that she finds at the Merwedeplein at Amsterdam. In 1934 he two girls move to the new house after having stayed at their grandmother Holländer at Aachen.
    Anne attends a Montessori school.

    At May 10, 1940 the German Army invades the Netherlands and many restrictions are forced upon Jewish population.
    On her 13th birthday Anne gets a diary. She starts writing from that day on. The rumours that Jews will be transported to Germany are true. At July 5, 1942 Margot receives a notice to report herself.
    The Frank family had expected the notice and father Frank already had started preparing a hideout at the building where he his office is (the present Anne Frank House).
    Not only the Frank family hides at the Achterhuis; also the van Pels family, Hermann and Auguste and their son zoon Peter, also do.
    The families are helped by the office workers Miep Gies, Johannes Kleiman, Victor Kugler and Bep Voskuijl. In November 1942 Fritz Pfeffer joins to two families.

    Life is difficult. The eight people hiding have to stay indoors day and night. During daytime when the office and basement warehouse is in operation, they have to stay quiet and not operate the bathroom. Living so close together is hard without quarrels. At times the situation gets tense.
    During lunchbreak they get the latest news on the ongoing deportations and what is happening in the concentration camps. In 1944, after D-Day, they are waiting to be liberated and hope for peace.

    Unfortunately someone betrays the families and at August 4, 1944 a SS-officer and three Dutch policemen enter the building and force Victor Kugler to show them the hideout. All are arrested and brought to prison. Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl stay behind and save Anne's diary.

    The families are transported to camp Westerbork at August 8, 1944. At September 3 1019 Jews, including both families, are deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau in a terrible three day train journey. Men and women are seperated and two families are forced to hard labour. Hermann van Pels is the first to die.
    At the end of Octobre Anne and Margot are being transported to Bergen-Belsen and both die in March 1945 from typhoid fever. Their mother who stayed at Auschwitz already died in January.

    Otto Frank is the only one who survives the war; Auschwitz is liberated at January 27, 1945. Otto returns to Amsterdam at June 3, 1945. He knows his wife died, but still has hope to find his daughters. He meets the four office workers who helped the family and they return the personal belongings, including Anne's diary. At July 18 Otto meets the sisters Brilleslijper who witnessed the dead of Anne and Margot. After reading Anne's diary he decides to grant Anne's wish to publish her experiences after the War.

    Opening hours:
    January through mid-March:
    Daily: 9AM - 7PM

    Mid-March through June:
    Su-Fr: 9AM - 9PM
    Sa: 9AM - 10PM

    July through August:
    Daily: 9AM - 10PM

    September through mid-September:
    Su-Fr: 9AM - 9PM
    Sa: 9AM - 10PM

    Mid-September through December:
    Daily: 9AM - 7PM

    Admission fee: € 8,50 (adult)

    Avoid waiting in line.

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  • Bluedawg1968's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank House

    by Bluedawg1968 Written Feb 21, 2006

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    Anne Frank House

    Daily from 9:00 AM - 7:00 PM.
    March 15 through September 14
    from 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM.

    Last Admittance:
    Thirty minutes prior to closing.

    Exceptions
    January 1: 12 noon - 7:00 PM.
    May 4: 9:00 AM - 7:00 PM.
    June 24: 9:00 AM - 7:00 PM.
    December 21: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM.
    December 25: 12 noon - 5:00 PM.
    December 31: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM.

    Closed on Yom Kippur.
    In 2006, on Monday October 2.

    Adults: ? 7,50
    Age 10-17: ? 3,50
    Age 0-9: free
    Euro 26-Card: ? 3,50

    "Museumkaart" not valid. No group discount. Payment cash or with Maestro or through Visa- or Mastercard, at the entrance.

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    263 Prinsengracht

    by BMer Updated Aug 18, 2007

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    263 Prinsengracht
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    A must-see when in Amsterdam. For me, it was a sad and interesting experience.

    A visit to the Anne Frank House is about an hour long. There are no tours or guides. A tour brochure with background information about the different rooms in the museum is available at the entrance.

    The museum is open from 9AM - 9PM (summer hours). Get there early or late in the day to avoid lineups. Admission is € 7.50 (adult).

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  • Very moving.....

    by CoAir13 Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Anne Frank Huis

    I think the Anne Frank House is a requisite when visiting Amsterdam! While this museum has gone through a lot of renovation to handle the amount of people who visit, the Secret Annex has maintained its authenticity. Once you step foot past the bookcase that hid the secret stairs, you can feel what it must have been like for 8 people in hiding. Don't let the long queue outside discourage you from visiting...it moves quickly. The video clips of Miep and Otto are particularly moving, as are the actual writings of Anne herself!

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  • kymbanm's Profile Photo

    A glimpse into WWII history

    by kymbanm Updated Feb 21, 2005

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    Keisersghracht Canal, near Anne Frank House

    I was only in AMS for 2 days, and had a short list of 'must do's' ... the Anne Frank House was on this list. Everything I had read about timing for entrance to avoid lines was correct - get there early! We left our hotel near Damrak to begin our walk about 0800, when we arrived about 15 or so minutes later .. there was already a line! Fortunately, since we were there before opening, the line moved quickly.

    Not only do you get to tour the living areas described in the diary I read as a child, the end of the tour is a series of museums, they included interviews w/ other camp survivors, those who knew the Frank family, as well as newsreels of events of the time; the diary is displayed under glass in this area too.

    I found this activity touching and coudln't imagine missing it!

    The end of the tour is a giftshop (of course), with the Anne Frank Diary for sale in numerous languages. Most of my family is studying various languages, so instead of buying them books, I had just picked up tour pamphlets in the requisite languages upon my entry into the tour ... less expensive, and less heavy to carry home :)

    We started walking w/ a general idea of the area we were heading towards .. but had forgotten our maps and such .. once you are in the region, there are signs to help point the way. The canal shot shows the side of the building we ended up going to for the start of the tour ... the modern looking one down that side street :)

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  • Helga67's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank's home

    by Helga67 Updated Oct 20, 2004

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    Anne Frank huis

    This museum is a must-see when you are interested in the situation of the Jewish people during WWII. The museum tells the life of a Jewish child during WWII. Anne Frank kept a diary during her period of hiding for the German Nazis. Her family went underground in the backhouse of her father's company and they stayed there for about 2 years until someone gave them away to the Germans. They were transported to the concentration camps and only the father survived the cruelty. He published his daughter's diary after the war, which got world famous.

    You can visit the house where you are informed by personal documents, photos and videofilms about the life of this family and what happened afterwards. You can visit the backhouse to see how they lived. The furnish, however, is gone but photos and a scale-model give a good impression of how it looked like.

    There is always a long line waiting in front of the museum. Try to come as early as possible or late in the afternoon. It will take you about 1.5 hours to see it all. Unfortunately, you are not allowed to take pics inside.

    Open from 9 am to 7 pm
    Admission price: 7.5 EUR

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  • elPierro's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank huis

    by elPierro Written Oct 1, 2006

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    Queue in front of the Anne Frank huis

    The house where Anne-Frank hided for the Nazis is preserved and nowadays a Museum. A vital piece of WW2 history and a must-see.

    Don't be scared by the modern entrance, the real house is a few doors further at number 263 (you can find a small sign on the door) and you will be walking in the real building where she wrote her diary behind the bookcase in a little room in secret.

    Not only do you see the house where she and her family lived during the war, there is also a brief summary on her life, attributes and naturally you can her see the real preserved diary of which so many copies in so many languages now populate the world.

    Entrance is €7,50, be advised that this place is popular so come early if you don't want to wait in a queue.

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