Anne Frank House, Amsterdam

4.5 out of 5 stars 241 Reviews

Prinsengracht 267 +31-20-5567100

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  • front of Anne Frank house
    front of Anne Frank house
    by jlynyc
  • Anne Frank House from across the street
    Anne Frank House from across the street
    by monica71
  • Statue of Anne Frank near the Anne Frank Huis.
    Statue of Anne Frank near the Anne Frank...
    by zadunajska8
  • elPierro's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank huis

    by elPierro Written Oct 1, 2006

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    Queue in front of the Anne Frank huis

    The house where Anne-Frank hided for the Nazis is preserved and nowadays a Museum. A vital piece of WW2 history and a must-see.

    Don't be scared by the modern entrance, the real house is a few doors further at number 263 (you can find a small sign on the door) and you will be walking in the real building where she wrote her diary behind the bookcase in a little room in secret.

    Not only do you see the house where she and her family lived during the war, there is also a brief summary on her life, attributes and naturally you can her see the real preserved diary of which so many copies in so many languages now populate the world.

    Entrance is €7,50, be advised that this place is popular so come early if you don't want to wait in a queue.

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  • Rixie's Profile Photo

    The Secret Annexe

    by Rixie Written Jan 1, 2006

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    Brochures, Anne Frank Huis

    We timed our visit to the Anne Frank Huis for late afternoon, about 5:00 p.m., in an attempt to avoid long lines, and it worked: we waited only about 20 minutes to get in.

    It was a very sobering experience to be in the Secret Annexe I'd read about when I was a child (Otto Frank's heavily edited version) and when I was a young adult (the unabridged version, a much better, more complete "picture" of Anne). The Annexe was much larger than I had imagined it, taking up two floors of the building. But, of course, there were three families living there, and however large a prison is, it's still a prison.

    There were short video loops, photos, exhibits, and excerpts from Anne's diary to look at as you wound your way through the rooms and up and down impossibly narrow, winding staircases. Some of the steps were so small and short that I had to put my feet diagonally onto them, very carefully, to get a foothold. This is a hazard that nobody mentions: elderly or large people should be forewarned. I wonder what the British couple ahead of us did -- they had a baby in a stroller.

    I can't imagine living like that, in silent, darkened rooms, for two years, depending on friends for food, and being in constant fear. It brought tears to my eyes when, at the end of the self-tour, I read a passage in which Anne said how grateful she was to God for giving her the ability to write.

    I'm so glad that we were able to see the Anne Frank Huis. It's important to be reminded not only of the cruelty that exists in the world, but also of the resilience, and eventual triumph, of the human spirit.

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  • Rupanworld's Profile Photo

    The Anne Frank Haus - A must

    by Rupanworld Written Jan 29, 2008

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    A secret photo of secret door to the secret annexe
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    For anybody visting Amsterdam, a visit to the Anne Frank House is almost a must. And if you visit there please ensure that you have sufficient time in hand, not only for waiting in the queue outside before entering but also to have alook at everything inside patiently. I had agood experience and did not have to wait in queue as I had already booked an entrance ticket a day before on the website of the House. So I could enter immediately. As I arrived there at 10.30, the crowd was also less and I could really see around with alot of time. but people arriving beyond 11.30, I saw them in queues even inside the house and in such a situation you really don't have an option to move about as per your choice and spend more time near the exhibit that you want to but be compelled to move with the queue even though you might not have finished seeing a particular exhibit. So my advice is to book tickets in advance if possible and go to visit the house at around 10 am to 10.30 am, so that instead of spending time in the queue outside you have more time for the inside.

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  • MikeySoft's Profile Photo

    Ann Frank House

    by MikeySoft Updated May 13, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I spent most of the morning here. No pictures are allowed inside like there were on my first trip during my college days. Too bad I cannot find my old pictures, that was a long time ago.

    I did not go during my 2002 trip because of the long lines so arrive very early or very late should you be in Amsterdam during the tourist season. . No problems with lines early in the morning at the end of September.

    See the web link for additional information.

    You should go when you are in Amsterdam.

    Please rate this and my other tips whey you find them useful.

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  • Sprucebeer's Profile Photo

    Anne Frankhuis

    by Sprucebeer Written Dec 28, 2004

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    Anne Frankhuis

    Definitely a must see. Brings you back to an important time in history. I knew the story of Anne Frank, but seeing the house… I couldn’t get over how small the living quarters were, where they remained for two years. Makes you think about the horror they went through for 2 years and the even greater horror to follow.

    You can roam around the whole canal house except for the top attic.

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  • garridogal's Profile Photo

    An Emotional Experience

    by garridogal Written Feb 7, 2004

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    A small memorial to an amazing little girl
    1 more image

    A strange thing happened to me when I went to the Anne Frank Huis. As soon as I walked in to the museum, my eyes welled up and I found myself fighting back tears. Considering that it was the most crowded of the museums that I visited while in Amsterdam, I felt the sadness contained in the walls of this structure.

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  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank house - Casa de Ana Frank

    by spanishguy Updated Sep 7, 2008

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    Anne Frank's tree
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    The Anne Frank House is a museum dedicated to this Jewish girl, who hid from Nazi persecution with her family and four other people in hidden rooms at the rear of the building. As well as the preservation of the hiding place and an exhibition on the life and times of Anne Frank, the museum acts as an exhibition space to highlight all forms of persecution and discrimination. It opened in 1960 with the aid of public subscription.

    The Secret Annex is the rear extension of the building. It was concealed from view by houses on all four sides of a quadrangle. Its secluded position made it an ideal hiding place for the Frank family. They remained hidden here for two years and one month until they were anonymously betrayed to the Nazi authorities, arrested, and deported to their deaths in concentration camps. Of the hidden group, only Otto Frank, the father, survived the war. Before the building was cleared a woman who had helped hide the families, returned to the hiding place against the orders of the Dutch police and rescued some personal effects. Amongst the items they retrieved was The Diary of Anne Frank. In this diary she speaks with real pleasure about a horse-chestnut tree, which is terrify ill nowadays. One way or another there is an association who is trying to save this tree, a real symbol of superation.

    La casa de Ana Frank es un museo dedicado a esta niña judía, que estuvo escondida de la persecución nazi con su familia y otras cuatro personas en habitaciones ocultas en la parte trasera del edificio. Además de la conservación de la parte oculta del edificio y una exposición sobre la vida y los tiempo de Ana Frank hay una zona de exposición que resalta todas las formas de discriminación y persecución que existen. Fue abierto en 1960 por subscripción pública.

    El Anexo Secreto es la parte trasera del edificio, que no se veía porque las casas formaban un cuadrado total que lo ocultaban, Esta posición secreta fue el refugio ideal esconderse la familia Frank. Estuvieron escondidos durante dos años y un mes, hasta que fueron traicionados anónimamente a las autoridades nazi, que los arrestaron y deportaron hasta su muerte en diferentes campos de concentración. Del grupo que se escondió sólo Otto Frank, el padre, sobrevivió a la guerra. Antes de que el edificio fuera desalojado una mujer que ayudó a las familias escondidas volvió al lugar escondido contraviniendo las órdenes de la policía holandesa y rescató algunos objetos personales, entre los que se encontraba el Diario de Ana Frank. En éste diario ella habla con verdadera ilusión sobre un castaño, que está bastante enfermo en la actualidad. De todos modos se ha creado una asociación que trata se salvar el arbol, un verdadero símbolo de superación.

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  • GrantBoone's Profile Photo

    ANNE FRANK HOUSE.

    by GrantBoone Updated Apr 17, 2004

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    My friend Jeff outside the house.

    Anne Frank , the jewish girl who during the second world war hid along with her family for 3 years in a secret annexe in the top two floors of an Amsterdam house before being discovered by the Germans just a few months before the end of the war.

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  • tweetycaro's Profile Photo

    House of Anne Frank

    by tweetycaro Updated Dec 22, 2004

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    I think everyone had read the book at school and always remembered the life of Anne Frank, visiting the house made a really big impression on me.
    The former hiding place, where Anne Frank wrote her diary, is now a well-known museum. The museum tells the history of the eight people in hiding and those who helped them during the war. Anne Frank's diary is among the original objects on display.
    Don't get scared of the long waiting line in front of the house, it is worth it !!!!!!

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  • Stef619's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank

    by Stef619 Written Jun 2, 2006

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    Growing up I read Anne Frank's Diary more times than I can remember. So when I planned my trip to Amsterdam her house was a "must see". Words cannot express how I felt walking through the home where she and her family and two other familes hid during World War II. Everyone who visits Amsterdam should take some time and visit so that no one ever forgets.

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  • ChrsStrl's Profile Photo

    Long queues for Frank

    by ChrsStrl Written Jul 11, 2004

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    A memorial sculpture

    The Anne Frank House has long queues. It is where the teenage Frank lived hidden with seven others of her family before being deported to Belsen where she died. Money raised from the sales of her 'diary' fund the Anne Frank Foundation which combates racism - so buy one!

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  • siaki68's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank House

    by siaki68 Written Jan 4, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ok, I think that the story of Anne Frank and her diary (the original diary is on display in the museum) is well known. The most important is that this particular museum does not only keep the memory of Anne Frank alive, but also makes a great effort to inspire people to become actively involved with the ideas of freedom and human rights, training schools and other organizations. And the best is that everyone who would like to help can become a “friend of the Anne Frank house”. More details about this and about the museum, at www.annefrank.nl.

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  • lamentforicarus's Profile Photo

    The Anne Frank House

    by lamentforicarus Updated Feb 13, 2005

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    As the Nazi party gained power in the mid 1930's, the Frank family relocated from their hometown of Frankfurt to Amsterdam, which was then considered to be a safe haven. In 1940, the Nazis moved into the Netherlands, slowly and systematically forcing the Jewish residents into a corner of the city. The Frank family would eventually go into hiding in the office building of Otto Frank, Anne's father. The small annex inside the building was soon the sanctuary of Hermann and Auguste van Pels and their son Peter, as well as Fritz Pfeffer who later joined. Office Personnel would protect the secret annex until in 1944 it was betrayed and discovered by Nazi soldiers, who deported the people in hiding to death camps. Otto Frank was the only survivor.
    Today, the home can be entered via the adjacent neighborhood house. The route winds through the different rooms of the house, where TV screens and texts on the wall slowly reveal the tragic tale of the Frank family. A flight of steep stairs and narrow corridors lead to the secret annex, where a few items left behind by the Franks can be viewed. Walking through the crammed quarters of the Frank family and the other people in hiding gives the visitor an eerie look at just how difficult it must have been to be confined to such a small space for nearly two years. For fear of alerting the neighbors to their whereabouts, the group in hiding was forced to keep out of sight and make little noise, restricting their movements around the annex and limiting any activity. The most haunting part of the visit is stepping into the room which houses the famous diaries themselves. Many of the pages have been torn out and are in disarray, but the books themselves are in remarkably fine condition. After completing a tour of the house, visitors return to the ground floor, where copies of the diary can be purchased in dozens of languages, along with many other souvenirs.

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank House

    by Paul2001 Written Nov 6, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Anne Frank House

    The Anne Frank House is one of the sites in Amsterdam that I think that all should visit as a moral obligation. It was here from July 1942 to their discovery by the Nazis in August 1944, that Anne Frank, a young teenage girl, and her family hid in very cramp conditions. While in hiding, Anne Frank recorded her impressions of her life here for the two year period in a now famous diary.
    The rooms in which here eight family members lived in are largely left as they were back during World War II. As you tour the building you can get a vivid idea on how difficult the conditions were for Anne Frank and her family and for the thousand other Jews that were being hidden from the Nazis throughout Europe. As we must always remind ourselves where unbridled hatred leads to, I think that this museum should be a must-see for all. Today the house is a museum dedicated to the Frank Family and to those who died during the Holocaust. There is an addition to the house where there are multimedia exhibits about the Holocaust and a word of warning about any resurgence of such catastrophes
    As for the Frank Family, they were betrayed in August 1944 and sent off to various concentration camps in occupied Europe. Anne herself died of typhoid in Belsen in March of 1944 just two weeks before the camp was liberated by the British Army. Only here father survived imprisonment.
    One word of warning. This is a very popular attraction, as it should be, therefore there are very long lines to enter and to pass through the museum

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  • 416Guy's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank House

    by 416Guy Updated Mar 20, 2004

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    Exterior shot of Anne Frank House

    An absolute must see when visiting Amsterdam in the historic Anne Frank House. I actually looked out the same windows that the Franks looked out, it was a very moving experience and one that I will never forget. Sorry, no photographs or video are permitted. Admission is 7,50 euros for adults and museum card is not accepted.

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