Anne Frank House, Amsterdam

4.5 out of 5 stars 241 Reviews

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  • front of Anne Frank house
    front of Anne Frank house
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    Anne Frank House from across the street
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  • Statue of Anne Frank near the Anne Frank Huis.
    Statue of Anne Frank near the Anne Frank...
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  • Anne Frank House

    by sabsi Updated Apr 16, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Anne

    Anne Frank House hosts a museum on the terrible & short life of the jewish girl Anne Frank who together with her family went into hiding for 2 years during WWII.

    It's located in the original house and annex in which the Frank family was hiding for a long time before being caught in 1944. The house has been redecorated so that it looks like in those days. It's quite impressive with Anne's quotes on the walls and films and documents to see.

    Then you pass the bookcase that stood in front of the secret door to the annex. You make your way up the steep stairs into the original rooms which is rather depressing (especially if you have read the book!). To see Anne's decorations on the wall and to see how dark it was and how depressing it must have been not to be able to walk out into the sunshine, not to open the windows and to keep quiet all day. Scared of being heard or caught all the time.... Terrible! I almost fainted in these rooms. There were hundreds of people around me but I didn't even realised they were there anymore. I was just too shocked.

    In the end you come to another museum part where I was able to breathe again. Here you will find out about the deaths of the people in hiding (only Anne's father survived the concentration camp) and about the story of the book "Anne Frank's Diary".

    It took me quite a while to finally see Anne Frank House because the stories of long queues always scared me away. Now that I was back in Amsterdam I really wanted to see it. We went there in the late afternoon on good friday and queued for half an hour maybe so I guess that's ok really. Admission is 7.50 Euro and now that I have seen this place I have to say: It's a must to go. But read the book before!!!

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    Remember Anne Frank

    by vickss Updated Sep 29, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I had only a vague knowledge of Anne Frank and her story with the Nazi movement when I first visited the place in 2003.
    The place which is walking distance from Leidesplein and has a long queue to get inside.
    Inside you get a ticket for a few euros..(the latest rate as of September'09 is 8.5 euros for an adult). One can also book online and avoid average 15-20 minutes waiting time at the entrance queue. BTW the ticket desk accepts cash as well as credit card at the entrance gate.
    The place opens at 9 AM (barring few days of the year)and depending on the time of the year remains open till 9-10 pm max.
    The house which was basically used by Anne to hide away from the Nazis has been maintained pretty well with almost the same feel and with good visual media presentation at points to explain the room etc.
    At some places it is a steep climb of stairs and so it is not recommended for those who hv problem climbing.
    The house overlooks a canal and is a grim reminder of what all nonsense happened in the world!
    Theres a museum shop at the last leg of the house which has all kinds of books, etc..

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    Museums - the “Anne Frank House”

    by Pavlik_NL Written Dec 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Where Anne Frank was hiding for the bad world

    Anne Frank-house is the place where Anne Frank wrote her worldfamous diary after which she and her family were found and deported to the Nazi-concentrationcamps. The museum is not big, but the spirit of the dark days of war and procecution of jews is still felt in 'het achterhuis', the backside of a canal house, which was hidden behind a secret door with bookshelves

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  • JetlagCity's Profile Photo

    The Anne Frank House

    by JetlagCity Updated Jun 6, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    canal

    It really was a strange feeling to be in the "Secret Annex", the upper-floor rooms where 13 year-old Anne Frank and her Jewish family hid from the Nazis for two years(!). I've never read Anne's famous diary from this time period, but I might now that I've been here. It's very difficult for me to imagine actually having to hide for years. It's very hard to imagine NEVER going outside for two years. Also hard to imagine having to share your few rooms with other people who aren't your family, and not having any privacy.

    You can see where the entrance to the very steep, narrow staircase leading to the rooms was hidden behind a bookcase, and imagine the people behind it trying so desperately not to make noise. Walking through the rooms made it all seem a little more real. There are also videos playing of interviews with people who knew Anne and her family.

    My best tip, if you're here during high season, is to come in the evening. The Anne Frank House gets 12 million visitors a year so it can be crowded, but it's open till 9:00pm in high season. It was around 6:30 or 7:00pm when we went and there was no line to get in, nor was it crowded inside.

    You're not allowed to take pictures inside, so this shot is just a typical scene of bicycles by a canal.

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  • A Personal view of a human tragedy

    by fellman01 Written Apr 17, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    6,000,000 Jews died at the hands of the Nazi's during WW II. The individual human tragedies behind are sometimes hard to grasp but a visit to the Anne Frank house makes it possible. The hidden "House" was actually in the back/attic of a jam factory. Anne's father, Otto Frank, was the General Manager of the factory. He was the only survivor. He discovered his daugher's diary when he returned after the war and it has become a must read for anyone who wishes to better understand the tragic events of the 1940s. The Museum does a very good job explaining the Holocaust and the Frank family history. A must see.

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    Anne Frank Huise

    by Myfanwe Updated Mar 9, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Anne Franks house has been open to the public since 1960 and is an extremely popular tourist attraction. On entering the house there is a small exhibition showing plans of the house & giving snap shots of Anne Franks Diary on the walls. Anne and her family took up hiding in the annex of the house in 1942 when the German Nazi's occupied the Netherlands during World War II. Later on they were joined by the Van Pels and Fritz Pfeffer.

    On walking round the rooms you will see display cases containing information, pictures, forged documents. The rooms had an eerie feel to them. Anne's room still has the original posters and postcards which she used to brighten up the room.

    Also on Display is the original diary which Anne received on her Thirteenth Birthday. This is where she documented her thoughts,feelings and events whilst the families were in hiding, the diary was later published by her father Otto.

    Once you have finished the tour of the house you will come to a very nice coffee shop which has a reading table containing publications of the Anne Frank House which you can buy in the museum book store.

    As this is a highly popular tourist attraction it is always busy, to avoid lenghthy queues I would suggest getting there just as it opens. (see website for details) I did this, my visit was out of season - on a windy Sunday January morning. I got there just after opening time and still there were a few people in front of me!

    There are some steep wooden stairs leading to the annex in the house.

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    A must visit when your in Amsterdam

    by Whitewidow21 Written Apr 23, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Ann Frank musem was a great place to visit. I remember studing what she went through in school; it brings it all to perspective once you visit the musem. There isen't any tour guide, you just follow the arrow that guides you through a timeline of what the Franks and fellow friends went through. It was amazing because i actually saw her journal, the one she actually wrote in. The journal was in a glass memorabilia.
    It was unfortunate becase right when i stepped in and began taken photos; one of the workers enlightened me that i couldn't take any photos; luckily i took just one picture inside before i was stopped.

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    A Secret Annex

    by goodfish Updated Dec 13, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Building Front: Frank Offices
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    You've been living under a rock if you don't know the story but it takes on completely different perspective to experience where it all took place. This most-visited of Amsterdam's tourist attractions does a remarkable job - both through their extensive website and on-site displays - of dispelling any romantic notions of juvenile diary scribbling one may had gotten from book, play or movie and presenting the facts in stark reality.

    Casual readers of the diary may not know that the Frank family were not Dutch but German Jews who had fled Frankfurt to Amsterdam to escape the ominous beginnings of Hitler's regime when Annelies Marie Frank was little more than a toddler. The small plaid volume presented as a birthday gift shortly before the family went into hiding was really an autograph book that, because it had a lock, made a perfect vehicle for keeping a teenager girl's thoughts away from prying parental eyes. But the pages were quickly filled and she continued her writing on loose-leaf paper and notebooks, rewriting the original in hopes of having it published as a novel after the war. "The Diary Of a Young Girl" as it stands is Otto Frank's compilation of both original and revised material with passages edited out and selected use of Anne's pseudonyms for household members.

    The living quarters comprised 3 upper floors of a rear annex to Mr. Frank's larger office building that are reached via steep, narrow flights of stairs. The rooms are small, dark and unfurnished; the Nazi captors having emptied them of furniture and most possessions as was customary. The website has representations of how they would have looked when occupied so you can get the feel of how claustrophobic that 2-year confinement must have been for eight people.

    Exhibits in Otto Frank's former office and and newer wings of the building provide displays of some of the few relics that weren't appropriated after arrest, family photos, general overviews of the Holocaust and, of course, the diary and other of Anne's original documents. Online guides are available in 21 languages and the website is packed with great background information you should explore before your visit: VERY highly recommended if taking children.

    Know before you go:

    • Time-specific tickets can be ordered through the website: recommended as this is a heavily visited attraction

    • Because of the steep stairs it's not accessible to wheelchairs or other mobile disabilities and could be uncomfortable for persons who dislike small, crowded spaces. See the accessibility section of the website for visiting the cafe, book shop and new wing exhibits.

    • The I Amsterdam Pass is not valid here

    • They do not have a coat/bag check. Large backpacks or luggage must be left in lockers at the train station or at your hotel. Prams/strollers can be parked near the information desk.

    • No photos or filming of any kind is allowed, and please turn off your phone

    • The bookshop is a great place to buy a copy of the diary in any of 24 languages for daughters, granddaughters, nieces, etc.

    • Open every day of the year but hours vary so see this page for hours, ticket prices, etc.

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank House

    by Britannia2 Updated Jul 15, 2009

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    The entrance to the hiding place
    1 more image

    I had seen the new BBC drama in the winter on Anne Frank and really wanted to see the house again - I had seen it once before in 1975. Anne would have been 80 in 2009 and so it was a chilling experience to re-visit. Several tourists walked away when they saw the 8 euro admission price but I did want to see the house and at least a part of the entry fee goes to the Frank foundation. You walk through the warehouse where work carried on below the hiding family and then climb up through the floors and when you pass through the moving book case that was the entrance to the hiding place it really brought home to me how awful life must have been here in 1942.
    The rooms the visitor sees are not furnished and I would prefer for them to be so. However the small size of the rooms is easy to see and imagine how cramped it must have been.
    The visit ends with a section on the holocaust and how the Franks were sent to a death camp.
    All signage is in Dutch and English - this lead to non English speakers moving quickly through the house getting in the way of the people following the signposted route.
    There is a gift shop and cafe at the end of the tour. Not suitable for disabled people.
    If you find this house interesting do visit the Ten Boom museum in nearby Haarlem (see my Haarlem pages).

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  • JJBlondie's Profile Photo

    A Somber Moment to Reflect

    by JJBlondie Written Aug 19, 2004

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    I visited the Anne Frank House while I was in Amsterdam. How could I not visit it? It was one of the most interesting museums I've been in, and certainly one of the most educational. The stories, the letters, the videos, each and every piece touched my heart and brough tears to my eyes. This is a place to reflect on life. A place to reflect on the beauty of the human spirit to survive despite the oppression and difficult circumstances around.

    Anne Frank was a courageous little girl, and her death in the end is a tragic tale. My visit taught me about the holocaust, and about the things that happened in WWII that no one wants to remember, and yet no one can forget.

    Make this a part of your journey through Amsterdam. Its worth every penny, and every second you spend there.

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    Anne Frank House

    by rcsparty Written Nov 1, 2006

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    The Anne Frank House is one of th emost sees in Amsterdam. If you have ever read the book, walking into the hiding space, void of furniture, will bring back all the emotions you could pick up from her diary. It is a very moving experience, as you try to imagine two families hiding in this space for 2 years, always waiting to be discovered. It is amazing they didn't go insane. you can also view her actual diary in a glass display. The lines get extremely long, so get there early, or better yet, get there early on a week-day. If you do get stuck in a line, it does move somewhat quickly.

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    Anne Frank House

    by acemj Updated May 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Yes, it's one of the most popular and crowded tourist attractions in the city, but for some reason, I felt compelled to visit. It's amazing and sobering to think about how Otto Frank (Anne's father) found a place to hide in a small house right in the heart of Amsterdam. Eight people hid here for nearly two years in virtual silence, until the Germans tragically found them during a raid and sent them to concentration camps.

    To cope with the utter boredom, Anne kept a diary that his since been translated and published into many, many languages and is read worldwide. Sadly, only Otto survived the war.

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  • Boca24's Profile Photo

    Anne Frank House

    by Boca24 Written May 16, 2004

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    This is a must see for anyone. Most people have read (or at least heard of) Anne Frank's Diary, but to have the ability to actually walk through this house including climbing the staircase behind the bookshelf is an unbelievable experience.

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    Anne Frank Huis (Anne Frank House)

    by Jarin Written Jan 10, 2004

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    Anne Frank House

    It is in this house where Anne Frank wrote her famous diary when she, her family and family Van Daan, were hiding from the Nazis during the WW II.
    You can see here also the secret door to the room, where they were hidden. Further is this in fact a museum, which is visited yearly by approx. 800.000 people. Please note that there are long queues.

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  • Kajser-MK's Profile Photo

    Must not be forgotten

    by Kajser-MK Written Jun 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    I felt really unusual during my visit to this place. It was really frustrating to see what has happened there , how come a human beeings have been treated just because of religion /nationallity.
    War is a horrible thing, but killing people and destroying milions of them sipmply becuase of other ethnicity or religion is even more horrible.
    However, it was really nice to see this place- I remember I read the book in my teens couple of times, and this was really nice experience.
    Inside it is forbidden to take photos, so I only provide outer pictures.
    Entrance fee is 9 eur.

    Be prepared to wait in the line to enter. We went there around 9:30 and waitied some 45 minutes.
    When we were leaving the museum, the line was doubled in the meantime.

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