Central Station, Amsterdam

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  • Central Station
    by alyf1961
  • Central Station
    by alyf1961
  • Central Station
    by alyf1961
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Amsterdam CS - map.

    by breughel Written May 30, 2013

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    Centraal Station.
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    The architecture of Amsterdam CS is remarkable as well as its location along the water. The works on the square are now nearly finished and travelers, trams, busses, metro, taxis, all are dancing their ballet on what is the central transportation point of Amsterdam.

    I added here a map of the station and square. You can see in front of the station exits the locations of the trams. The metro is to be reached by stairs (no escalator) but there is one elevator near the GVB tickets and info offices. The bus stops are somewhat further. Taxis are standing on the right of the exit.

    The busiest station of the Netherlands has still no waiting room for the Thalys train travelers, at least I did not find one. So that if you are early to catch your train to Brussels you have to wait standing. Brussels has a special waiting room for the Thalys trains.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Central Station Exterior

    by nicolaitan Updated Jan 10, 2013

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    Central Facade
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    Leaving the Central Station after a long trip, one is unlikely to appreciate the beauty of the building. Turn around on the way out to the tram or GVB station and have a look.

    The facade is largely light red ( more expensive ) brick separated by vertical lines of stone, typical of late 19th Century Dutch architecture. It features large towers and reliefs as well as multiple coats of arms. At the time, many in largely Protestant Amsterdam were upset by the ornate decorations, likening them to a church ( Cuypers was a Catholic ). The towers are famous for two clocks, one a real clock and the other a disguised weathervane with the dial moving with the prevailing winds.

    In the center the coat of arms of The Netherlands as it appeared in the 19th and early 20th Centuries with the lions facing forward and crowned. The more modern coat of arms has the lions facing. Below is the coat of arms of Amsterdam flanked by coats of arms for 14 European nations. The main entrances are flanked by classic reliefs, vertically stacked triptychs.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Central Station

    by nicolaitan Updated Jan 6, 2013

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    Entrance
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    The largest majority of Amsterdam's 4 million visitors and 16 million day trippers arrive through this red brick neo-Renaissance building located on the shores of the IJ. It serves as a hub for ferries northbound, the majority of Amsterdam's tram lines, the commuter oriented metro train service, and trains throughout the Netherlands and beyond ( over 50 international trains per day ). Conveniently located across the Stationplein is the GVB office where chipcards up to one week duration can be purchasesd ( open only during business hours and on weekends only after 1000 as we learned the hard way ). It was built between 1881-9. The functional aspects were handled by AL van Gendt, an engineer/architect with extensive train experience and the architect Pierre Cuypers, more involved with aesthetics ( also architect for Rijkmuseum ). The cast iron roof is from England. The station is supported by over 8000 piliings sunk into three artificial islands and cannot be fully imaged from the ground with even a wide angle lens.

    The original site of the station was quite controversial in late 19th Century Amsterdam. The local government wanted the station more centrally located but the government in The Hague insisited on this site, wisely avoiding disrupting the center district by lots of train tracks and noise.

    The hallways of the station offer all the necessary business establishments including a travelex office selling chipcards up to 3 days duration but are understandably a bit dingy after so many years and with extensive reconstruction coinciding with construction of a new north south train line. When finished, the concourses will resemble a modern day airport, light and airy, as seen on available sketches, and be more oriented toward the waterfront. The original site placement decision will certainly turn out to have been correct. One can only get an idea of how beautiful the station must have been by checking out the tiled ceilings through accumulated grime.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Central Railway Station

    by HORSCHECK Written Dec 2, 2012

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    Central Railway Station
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    The history of Amsterdam's Central Railway Station building (Amsterdam Centraal) dates back to 1877 when the constructions began. It was built on three artifical islands as well as on 8687 wooden piles.

    The impressive Neo-Renaissance building was designed by the Dutch architects Pierre Cuypers and A. L. van Gendt. The front facade is decorated with the coat of arms of the Netherlands, Amsterdam and cities to which train connections exist, such as Madrid, Vienna and St. Petersburg.

    Directions:
    Amsterdam's Central Railway Station stands near the northern end of the busy Damrak street. The backside of the building faces the lake IJ.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Amsterdam Centraal

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 17, 2012

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    Amsterdam Centraal
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    Amsterdam Centraal is the central train station of Amsterdam. It is also one of the main railway hubs of the Netherlands and is used by 250,000 passengers a day, excluding transferring passengers. In addition, it's also the starting point of Amsterdam Metro lines 51, 53, and 54.
    Amsterdam Centraal's building was designed by Pierre Cuypers and A. L. van Gendt. It first opened in 1889 and features a roof span of approximately 40 metres fabricated in cast iron by Andrew Handyside of Derby, England.
    The building of Amsterdam Centraal is situated on three man-made islands, themselves resting on 8,687 wooden piles which have been driven deep into the muddy and sandy soil.

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Centraal to Everything

    by von.otter Written Dec 22, 2011

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    Centraal Station, Amsterdam, April 2011
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    “The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    — Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890)

    Centraal Station is Amsterdam’s main train station; some consider it the heart of the city. Every day 250,0000 people pass through the Amsterdam Central Station; it is the biggest public transport transfer location, serving visitors and locals alike. The final stop for several tram lines and buses are here, as well as waterfront stations for ferries, taking cars and passengers to Amsterdam Noord. Amsterdam’s main Tourist Office is located here, as well as departure quays for tourist boats that motor around the city’s canals.

    Designed in the Neo-Renaissance style, the building was opened to the public in 1889. Built on 8,600 wooden pilings rammed 30 meters into the sandy soil, a necessary building technique anywhere in Amsterdam, Centraal Station was designed by architect Pierre J. H. Cuypers, who also designed the Rijksmuseum. A. L. Gendt, designer the Concertgebouw, helped helped with Centraal Station’s design.

    Because in the spring of 2011 the whole station area was a construction site to allow for the creation of a new metro line, which will be completed at in 2015, I could not get an obstructed photo of the entire Station. Only details of the Station are included.

    The rear of the station faces the Ij harbor that separates downtown Amsterdam from North Amsterdam. When the station was built, the Ij had been Amsterdam’s connection to the open sea. Building the station where it is, cutting off the city from the waterfront, was a controversial move.

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  • klj&a's Profile Photo

    Central Station

    by klj&a Written Jun 27, 2010
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    I'll bet to the citizens of Amsterdam, this just the ole train station. But to me it's one of the most impressive buildings in Amsterdam. When walking around the area, be careful. There are tons of bikers, pedestrians, trams, etc. It is the main train station after all.

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  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Amsterdam Centraal Station

    by June.b Written Jun 20, 2010

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    The impressively designed red huge train station sits on a man made island right in front of the harbor was constructed with controversies - well that's the story or history - which you may not notice unless maybe if you're a city planner or ...uv read the story online.

    Anyhoo, chances are you'll end up here if you're getting in or out of Amsterdam to/from your next destination. There are lots of tram that starts and end here - but I prefer to walk, Amsterdam is not that big. The train from Haarlem stops here - a 15 miuntes ride.

    For me, it does not only serve as a transport hub, I used it for other handy things. For one, There is a "I amsterdam" tourist office inside the station where I bought a shirt and some other stuff, while most people buy their tours from there, transport cards, maps, and free tourist info.

    Secondly, it's a good place to meet up with friends, almost everyone knows the place.

    Third, there are some fastfood restaurants inside, stores, a toilet for EUR0.50 and lastly ---

    ....I took a shower there for EUR5 before boarding the overnight train to Munich - juz cuz checkout time in hotels is normally before noontime and I roam around the city the whole day until late afternoon and feeling dirty. Cost not including towel though which is an extra. Well worth it instead of paying a hefty extra extention rate from the hotel.

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Popinstituut

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Feb 7, 2010

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    Popinstituut

    Established since 1975, the Dutch Rock & Pop Institute (a.k.a. Nationaal Pop Instituut) is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Culture to promote Dutch music at home and abroad. Apart from pop and rock, it also promotes hiphop, urban, dance, crossover, roots and world music. In Holland all these musical styles can be classified in the overall term ‘popmuziek’ (pop music).

    Mediatheek Business hours:
    Mo - Fr: 10 AM - 5PM

    Admission: free entrance

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The authentic monument

    by viddra Updated Jan 16, 2010
    the station
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    When you step out the train, this is the first tourist attraction you’ll see in Amsterdam.

    This monument is in fact a masterpiece by Pieter Cuypers, the architect who also designed the Rijksmuseum. It was built at the end of the 19th century and was erected on three artificial islands.

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  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    Amsterdam Centraal Station

    by malianrob Written Nov 25, 2008

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    The hotel we stayed at was very close to the entrall Station soit made it very easy to get from thr Station to where we were staying at and also very easy to take trips outside of Amsterdam.
    The Cetraal Station can be alittle confusing but there are always someone around to help and evryone there speaks english. The Station was built between 1884-1889 on three man made islands. If you are a fan of architecture you will love this place. It is concidered a Dutch neo-renaissance design.It is a towering structure that really stands out.
    Whenever we got lost walking around Amsterdam I would just ask someone which way to the Centraal Station and I would find my way back with no problem.

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  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    Central Railway Station - Estación central

    by spanishguy Written Sep 15, 2008

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    Centraal Station
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    Amsterdam Centraal is the central station of Amsterdam. It is one of the main railway nodes of the Netherlands and is used by approximately 150,000 passengers a day. The station building was opened in 1889. It features a roof span of approximately 40 metres fabricated in cast iron. The station is currently under reconstruction so it was a pity not to see this beautiful building without all the working tools in front of them.

    The building of Amsterdam Centraal is situated on three man-made islands, themselves resting on 8,687 wooden poles which have been driven deep into the muddy and sandy soil.

    Amsterdam centraal es la estación central de Ámsterdam, uno de los principales nudos ferroviarios de Países Bajos, usado por aproximadamente 150.000 personas al día. El edificio de la estación abrió en 1889. Tiene un techo de unos 40 metros fabricado en acero. La estación está ahora restaurándose, fue una pena no poder ver este bonito edificio en todo su esplendor, sino con todas las máquinas delante.

    El edificio de Amsterdam Centraal está sobre tres islas artificiales construidas por el hombre, descansando sobre 8687 pilares de madera que han sido introducidos profundamente en el embarrado y arenoso suelo.

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  • dila's Profile Photo

    2nd wooden house cafe in t Aepjen

    by dila Updated Jul 20, 2008

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    second wooden house also a cafe

    the second wooden house is one of the 2 oldest wooden houses in amsterdam.
    it is located in a cafe filled with curious. the name of the cafe is 't Aepgen.
    it is built around 1518
    has been a store / shop before.
    the cafe is daily open 15.00 - 01.00

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  • dila's Profile Photo

    Centraal Station

    by dila Written Jul 20, 2008

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    Here you can take the trains, busses trams. On the north side you have the ferry s.
    picture is taken at the front side on the east part of central station.
    on the east side you have information, tickets and info and koffiehuis Smith.
    Tramlines 4,9,16,24,25 and 26 are on the eastside.
    tramlines 1,2,5,13 and 17 are on the westside.
    It is a mess at the moment probably till 2011 because the building the north south metro line.
    So be carefull where you walk

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  • VincentJJ's Profile Photo

    VTmeetingpoint

    by VincentJJ Written Jun 27, 2008

    Well Kenny. It's forbidden, after July the f1rst, to smoke tobacco, BUT!!!!
    you are allowed to smoke a 'joint'!!!!
    So no problems for the coffeeshops till now!
    b.d.w.=>
    MINI VTmeet saturday 19th 12:00 Smit's koffiehuis acros central Station!
    greetings

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