Koninklijk Palais - Royal Palace, Amsterdam

4 out of 5 stars 89 Reviews

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  • Koninklijk Palais - Royal Palace
    by Vanity666
  • Koninklijk Palais - Royal Palace
    by alyf1961
  • Koninklijk Palais - Royal Palace
    by alyf1961
  • Beautiful and very Historic Baroque Palace

    by fellman01 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Palace facade

    The old city hall and court house became the home of Napoleonic Royalty (and its current name) in the early part of the 19th century. The Royal family only rarely uses this central Amstserdam palace but that means it is accessible to the general public.
    It has spectacular Baroque frescoes, sculptures, and some very historic stories. It is also, surprisingly, not very crowded so is a good stop when you are looking for a break from the crowds.

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    Visit the royal palace

    by carolineraat Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Royal palace

    Amsterdam´s royal palace was once world´s 8th miracle, being the largest secular building in Europe. It was built in the 1600s in a wonderful classic style. Especially the marbe interiors are worth seeing. For instance, the large hall that is 30 m. high!

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    Royal Palace

    by jo104 Written Sep 22, 2010
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    I visited here on open monument day as it was half price entry and loved the feel of the stately rooms. The Royal Palace is used for state visits and I could only guess what nobility had slept in those beds. It was originally built as a town hall from 1648 - 1808 and you hear the tales of the torture room whilst the magistrates looked on. Next it became the palace of Louis Napoleon and the gold guilding gives the feel of the palace of versailles. So today the Palace of Orange came into exisitance from 1813 when Prince William of Orange returned to the city.

    Inside the palace you are led by guided audio tour and will see lavish furniture and intricate chanderliers.

    The palace is usually open except for a few weeks when there are state functions. Opening times 12- 5pm cost Adults Eur 7.50 children Eur 6.50

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    The Royal Palace

    by June.b Written Jun 18, 2010

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    Located right at the Dam Square and dominating the area, but there's a restoration/renovation going on during the time I was there (May 2010) and the complete facade of the building is covered in white.

    It is a 17th century city hall, then became the royal palace by King Louis 1.

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    Royal palace

    by Vanity666 Written Jun 6, 2010

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    The Royal Palace in Amsterdam (Dutch: Koninklijk Paleis Amsterdam or Paleis op de Dam) is one of four palaces in the Netherlands which is at the disposal of Queen Beatrix by Act of Parliament. The palace was built as city hall during the Dutch Golden Age in the seventeenth century. The building became the royal palace of king Louis Napoleon and later of the Dutch Royal House. It is situated in the west side of Dam Square in the centre of Amsterdam, opposite the War Memorial and next to the Nieuwe Kerk.

    On top of the palace is a large domed cupola, topped by a weather vane in the form of a Cog ship. This ship is a symbol of Amsterdam. Just underneath the dome there are a few windows. From here one could see the ships arrive and leave the harbour.

    The interiors, focusing on the power and prestige of Amsterdam, were completed later.

    Paintings inside include works by Govert Flinck (who died before finishing a cycle of twelve huge canvases), Jacob Jordaens, Jan Lievens and Ferdinand Bol. Rembrandt's largest work, The Conspiracy of Claudius Civilis was commissioned for the building, but after hanging for some months was returned to him; the remaining fragment is now in Stockholm.

    In its time the building was one of many candidates for the title of the Eighth Wonder of the World. Also, for a long time it was the largest administrative building in Europe.

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    The palace

    by viddra Updated Jan 14, 2010
    the palace

    This imposing building dominates the famous square. It was built in the 17th century, according to Van Campen’s designs, and served as the city’s seat of government for over a century. It is now used for official ceremonies.

    On the façade, you can see numerous allegorical sculptures by Artus Quellijn, and inside, there are several Halls, the magnificent Citizen’s Hall, where the present Queen Beatrix celebrated her wedding in 1966, the Minor Affairs of State Hall and the Judgement Hall, where judges used to meet to pronounce death sentences.

    The palace is open from mid-June to mid-September.

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    Royal Palace on Dam Square

    by malianrob Written Nov 24, 2008

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    The Royal Palace was built in the 1600's and it served as the town hall. This is originally where the city began when the Dam was built here. This is also a great place to take pictures. This place was designed by Jacob van Campen when the old town hall burnt down.
    This is the official home of the king or queen of the Netherlands. When they stay here this place is closed to visitors.

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    Dutch Royal Palace - Palacio Real Holandés

    by spanishguy Updated Sep 8, 2008

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    Royal Palace
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    The Royal Palace in Amsterdam, in the Dam, is one of three palaces in the Netherlands which is at the disposal of Queen Beatrix by Act of Parliament. In fact when I saw this building for first time I thought it was the town hall, but not the Royal Palace. Actually this building was opened has the city town hall in 1655. It was first a royal palace with Louis Napoleon Bonaparte, brother of Napoleon Bonaparte, when he became King of Holland in 1806. After his investiture as King William I of the Netherlands, however, Amsterdam was made the official capital of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands (the seats of government being Brussels and The Hague). The new King realised the importance of having a palace in the capital, and the Town Hall again became a royal palace. Currently it is used by the Queen for entertaining and hosting official functions, such as state visits, the New Year reception, and the presentations of different prizes.

    It's a bit dark and not very beautiful, but aparently it is wonderful inside. In fact, in its time the building was one of many candidates for the title of the Eighth Wonder of the World. Also, for a long time it was the largest administrative building in Europe.

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    The Royal Palace

    by Rupanworld Written Feb 2, 2008

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    The Royal Palace is situated on the Dam Square in the middle of Amsterdam, quite close to the Centraal Railway station. Originally built to be used as the city hall by the magistrates of Amsterdam in the 17-th century, presently it is one of the three Palaces under the Queen's control. It is used for official state functions like the Queen's New Year reception and for other official ceremonies like prize ceremonies.

    It was designed by architect Jacob van Campen, starting 1648. The entire building was made with white stones, none of which are visible now because of the dark tanning of the stones across centuries. On a close watch one can see very beautiful decorations on the building. Some of the interiors are done by the paintings of the famous painter Rembrandt. The building served as the city hall for about 150 years. In 1806, the brother of Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte, Louis Napoleon was appointed as the King of Holland. He started living in this building and so the city hall was transfromed into a Royal Palace. The building since then houses a huge collection of Empire furniture bought by Louis Napoleon. After the defeat of Emperor Napoleon in 1813, Prince William, who then became the King and started living in the Royal Palace. In 1936 it finally became state property.

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    Palace

    by el_ruso Updated Aug 29, 2007

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    The actual capital of the Netherlands is The Hague - the queen resides there permanently, and the parliament is located there as well. However, Amsterdam is a ceremonial capital.

    This large building was built as the city hall in the XVII century when the power and prestige of the Netherlands and Amsterdam were at their historical zenith. It served as a royal palace very briefly when Napoleon appointed his brother Louis as the Dutch king, but he did not like it, abdicated and left. Since then this is the official residence of the royals when they are visiting Amsterdam.

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    Koninklijk Paleis

    by BMer Updated Aug 18, 2007

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    The Royal Palace, which served as the city hall from 1655 until its conversion to a royal residence in 1808. Beside it are the 15th-century Gothic Nieuwe Kerk (New Church) and the Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum.

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    The Royal Palace

    by heryanta Written Jul 8, 2007

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    This beautiful building is unmissable due to its location right at the heart of the city center.
    The building is used by the Queen to host reception for other heads of state and also for formal royal processions, like the wedding of the crown prince in 2002.

    Normally, the palace is open to public during the summer months where it houses an exhibition of the history of the building and the history of the Dutch royal family.

    It is currently closed for renovation, but will be open again in early 2008. If you are going to Amsterdam in 2008 I advise you to pay a visit, as it gives a brief and enjoyable introduction to the Dutch royalties.

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    Royal Palace

    by darkjedi Updated Mar 15, 2007

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    The Royal Palace on the Dam is mainly used for official state functions. The Queen's New Year reception and various prize givings are held here. The Royal Palace is open to the public (individuals and groups) when it is not being used for official occasions but was closed for some time when I visited (Jan 2007). It was originally built as the city hall for the magistrates of Amsterdam.

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    Royal Palace

    by rcsparty Written Nov 1, 2006

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    The palace was built in the 16th century to replace the existing town hall. It was built on over 10,000 piles to give it stability in the marshy area. It was converted to the Royal Palace by Napolean's brother during his brief rule, and is still the official residance of the queen. Although it is only used for official functions. It may have been the grey skies, but I found the palace to be somewhat bland and un-distinct.

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    Koninklijk Paleis

    by mightywease Written Nov 14, 2005

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    Koninklijk Paleis

    The Koninklijk Paleis was built in the mid-17th Century when Amsterdam and the Netherlands were at the height of the countries trading power. It was not built to be a Royal Palace but was commissioned to be the grandest Stadhuis (Town Hall) in Europe. The intention being that it should be a representation of the power and influence enjoyed by the city at that time.
    It is certainly an impression building, in sheer bulk as much as anything else. Detail on its exterior includes statutes representing peace, war, prudence and justice and, at the rear Atlas holding up the world. Also at the rear is a wonderful triangular carved relief which shows Amsterdam, represented as a woman, surrounded by the personifications of the continents with which she trades and also the goods that are being traded. For example Asia ? a women in long robes ? holds the reins of a camel while children offer spices and jewels, there are also elephants and other exotic animals from Africa and sugar cane and tobacco from America. If you are wondering how my eyesight is so good at spotting all those details high up on the building I didn?t! There is a wonderful model of the relief in the Rijksmuseum. You can also see pictures ? contemporaneous with its building - of the Town Hall in both the Rijksmuseum and the Amsterdam Historical Museum and which give a feel of how proud the city was of its new Town Hall.
    In 1808 when Louis Bonaparte ruled as monarch during the French occupation he changed the Town Hall into a Royal Palace, as which it has continued since.
    Unfortunately the opening times vary and I have never been inside the palace but a walk round the outside allows you to see how imposing the building must have been when first built , and still remains now.

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