Schreierstoren, Amsterdam

4 out of 5 stars 10 Reviews

Prins Hendrikkade 94/95 +31-20-4288291

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  • Schreierstoren
    Schreierstoren
    by HORSCHECK
  • Schreierstoren
    Schreierstoren
    by HORSCHECK
  • Schreierstoren, Weeping Tower, Amsterdam, 5/2011
    Schreierstoren, Weeping Tower,...
    by von.otter
  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Schreierstoren

    by HORSCHECK Updated Dec 2, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Schreierstoren (Tower of Tears) is one of the few remains of Amsterdam's medieval stone city wall. It was errected in 1485.

    From here the English sea explorer Henry Hudson set sail in 1609 on his discovery journey to Northern America. A plaque on the tower reminds on this event.

    Nowadays the tower is home to a cafe with a small outdoor terrace.

    Directions:
    The Schreierstoren tower can be found at the wide street Prins Hendrikkade, almost opposite to Amsterdam's Central Railway station.

    Address: Schreierstoren, Prins Hendrikkade 94/95, 1012 AB Amsterdam

    Schreierstoren Schreierstoren
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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Screierstoren (Weeper's Tower)

    by codrutz Written Aug 15, 2004

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    From the Centraal Station area you can spot this round, rather low tower, at the end of the Geldersekade ("kade" meaning wharf or quay).

    This tower marked the place where sailors embarked for long voyages both to known lands and to countries still to be discovered. It is called "Weeper's Tower" because the wifes of the sailors cried as their husbands sailed away.

    Weeper's Tower

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    the schreierstoren

    by doug48 Written Jul 27, 2006

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    the schreierstoren, (weepers tower), was a defensive tower in the medieval city wall. built in 1480 it is one of the few medieval fortifications that still exist in the city. in 1609 henry hudson set sail from here for the east indies, of course as all new yorkers know, he discovered a river in america instead.

    schreierstoren
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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    Buildings - Schreierstoren (Tower of tears)

    by Pavlik_NL Written Dec 20, 2003

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    The "Schreierstoren" was part of the city-wall that surrounded Amsterdam from 1494 and took around 13 years to be built. The wall had a defensive character and on the corners watchtowers were placed. Other constructions were the entrance gates in places where the wall crossed main roads that let in and out the city. The "Schreierstoren" was built in 1487 and is the only one that's left from the pure defensive towers. Originally it was called the "Schreyhoeck"-tower as for the sharp curve (hoek = corner) that the wall made here. History however slowly changed the name, as many stories were told about women crying here while saying farewell to their men that sailed away from the "Gelderse" Kay (schreien = to cry). A wonderful plate with this scene inscripted added in this new, more popular name of the tower.

    Where legends says many tears are shed

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  • Jarin's Profile Photo

    De Schreierstoren (The Weeping Tower)

    by Jarin Written Jan 10, 2004

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    This tower was a part of the mediaeval brick-built city-wall (1480), to protect the city from intruders and flooding.
    The legend goes that the name of "Weeping Tower" is because from this tower weeping women saw their beloved ones sail away.
    Nowadays the tower houses a pub and a restaurant.

    De Schreierstoren
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    A/7 Schreierstoren

    by ATLC Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While making the previous picture, Igraine came out and called us in. We were indeed, a little late!
    Handshaking and kisses all around. Familiar faces with familiar names, familiar names and unfamiliar faces, new names and new faces!
    On the photo the interior of the VOC Café in Schreierstoren and Nighthawk in the background looking over some free publicity postcards.

    Schreierstoren built around 1487 is the only defence tower left of the fortifications built between 1481 en 1494.
    It's original name was Schreyhoecktoren, probably because of the sharp angle ("schrey") where Gelderse Kade and Oudezijds Kolk meet. But it is better known as the place where women saw their loved once leave for the sea. "Schreien" means "to cry".

    VOC stands for Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (Eastindian trading company), the world's first multinational which brought The Netherlands great riches.

    AMSTERDAM INSIDE SCHREIERSTOREN
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    B/8 Setting out

    by ATLC Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The first thing pieter_jan_v said to me when we arrived at the VOC pub was: You need new shoes. Now, wherever did he get that from?
    He was busy phoning people from the other VT meetings that were taking place that day (and he continued trying all day). I teased him with the enormous paperwork that he carried around. He did that in Rotterdam too, last August!

    AMSTERDAM SCHREIERSTOREN ON PRINS HENDRIK KADE
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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Don’t Cry for Me, Amsterdam

    by von.otter Written Dec 5, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    “Many of the streets of Amsterdam are narrow, but others are remarkably spacious, and have a magnificent appearance, such as the Heeren Graft (Lord Street), the Keyser’s Graft (King Street), and the Prinssen Graft (Prince’s Street), which are upwards of a hundred and forty feet in width, and following the crescent shape of the town, are each about two miles in length. All the streets are remarkable for their cleanliness, and arc very neatly paved, chiefly with brick, but there is no separate path for pedestrians. In most of them, a canal runs along the centre, bordered on each side by a row of noble elm, oak, or linden trees.”
    — The Saturday Magazine, January 1834

    ON THE STREETS The Saturday Magazine was a single-topic, British publication of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. The uncredited author misspelled gracht as graft, canal; heren as heeren, lord; kaiser as keyser, emperor; and prinsen as prinssen, prince.

    Erected in 1482, Schreierstoren was part of the defensive wall surrounding the city. During Holland’s Golden Age, the 17th and early 18th centuries, most of those fortifications were demolished. This stout brick tower survived because it served as a checkpoint for ships belonging to the Dutch East India Company.

    Because Schreierstoren commanded the best view of the ships at port, Amsterdam’s women waved and wept from this point as their men headed out to sea. It came to be known as the Tower of Tears or the Weeping Tower. Today, it’s a shop. Attached to Schreierstoren is a plaque (see photo #5) honoring Henry Hudson. From here, in 1609 he set sail in the Half Moon, to find a direct route to the East Indies; he found what would become Nieuw Amsterdam instead. This plaque was placed on Schreierstoren by an organization from my hometown, the Greenwich Village Historical Society.

    Schreierstoren, Weeping Tower, Amsterdam, 5/2011 Schreierstoren, Weeping Tower, Amsterdam, 5/2011 Schreierstoren, Weeping Tower, Amsterdam, 5/2011 Schreierstoren, Weeping Tower, Amsterdam, 5/2011 Schreierstoren, Weeping Tower, Amsterdam, 5/2011
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    No, woman, no cry

    by ozalp Written May 22, 2007

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    This tower seems like a building on its own but it was a remainder of the old city walls. It was built in 15th century and it was a part of the defense walls during Golden Ages. Also it was a checkpoint for the ships. Because of the situation, it was a farewell point for women.
    In this web page (http://www.euronet.nl/users/warnar/schreierstoren1.html) it is said that the Old Dutch name has a completely different meaning. It means “astride” because of being on the corner between two waterways, the Ye and the river Amstel.

    I've read that it was a café now.

    Schreierstoren Taken from the website Sign
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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    This Schreierstower dates from...

    by filipdebont Written Aug 24, 2002

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    This Schreierstower dates from 1480 and was part of the medieval city-walls.
    A legend tells that the name comes from the weeping of the ladies who were supposed to take leave of their husbands who left from this spot with their ships. (Schreien = to weep)

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