Van Loon Museum, Amsterdam

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    A beautiful canal house: Van Loon Museum

    by pieter_jan_v Updated May 5, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Van Loon Museum - Amsterdam

    Visit the Van Loon Museum. It is a double-sized canal house from 1672. The first resident was painter Ferdinand Bol, one of Rembandt's pupils.
    In the nineteenth century, the Van Loon family bought the house. The Van Loon's were well known. Some even wer mayor and Willem van Loon was a Dutch East-India Company (VOC) administrator. Throughout the centuries, the interior and exterior have remained practically intact.
    Also the garden can be visit.

    Visiting hours:
    Mo: 11AM - 5PM
    Tu: Closed
    We-Su: 11AM - 5PM

    Admission: € 8.00

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    Musuem van Loon, Interior, Part III

    by von.otter Updated Jan 5, 2012

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    Musuem van Loon, Amsterdam, April 2011
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    “When I marry I shall please myself without the aid of Ministers or people.”
    — Wilhelmina, Queen of the Netherlands (1880–1962) Her Majesty’s response when her Prime Minister brought her a list of possible politically-desirable consorts. She indignantly tore the paper to bits.

    The Van Loons were a well-connected family, a number of female family members served as ladies-in-waiting to several queens of the Netherlands.

    Like other canal house museums in Amsterdam, the Museum van Loon is a time capsule. Its artifacts cross centuries of work: 17th-century decorative arts, left over from the time of its first owner Ferdinand Bol and they accumulated new fashions from each subsequent century. The ornate period furniture, precious silver and porcelain, and other interior details are all perfectly authentic for their time. The palatial residence is also studded with family portraits — paintings, pastels and photos —as examples of their personal history.

    In addition, the museum has distinguished itself in the contemporary art world; since 1996, it has hosted contemporary exhibitions, often in collaboration with other local galleries and museums of contemporary art.

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    Musuem van Loon, the Garden

    by von.otter Updated Jan 5, 2012

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    Musuem van Loon, the Garden, Amsterdam, 4/2011
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    “The arch-enemy of mankind”
    — Wilhelmina, Queen of the Netherlands (1880–1962), her view of Adolph Hilter, whose army overran her country, driving her from her throne to Great Britain where she made regular broadcasts to her subjects, eager for her words of encouragement.

    Behind Museum van Loon lays a beautiful garden. It was designed in the style popular for the 17th century. The garden boasts carefully tended hedges, arranged in geometric patterns and beyond that the coach house, modeled on a Greek temple, can be seen in the background.

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    Musuem van Loon, Coach House

    by von.otter Written Jan 4, 2012

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    Musuem van Loon, Coach House, Amsterdam, 4/2011
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    “[F]irstly all male descendance is applied, including all collateral male lines; but if all agnates become extinct, then the closest heiress (such as a daughter) of the last male holder of the property inherits, and after her, her own male heirs according to the Salic order.”
    — The Semi-Salic law that governs the line of succession for the Dutch monarchy

    The van Loon House has a beautiful garden behind it. The smart building with the blue niches in the distance is the van Loon carriage house.

    The coach house is part of the museum, but was closed for renovation at the time of our visit. The museum bought it from the van Loon family in 2009. The original city collection of house, garden and coach house has now been reunited.

    The van Loons were very fond of horses and carriages. When they were in need of a carriage the coach driver went through the rear exit, onto the Kerkstraat and pulled up in front of the main entrance to the house on the Keizersgracht. The Honorable Willem Hendrik van Loon loved driving coaches himself and often competited on Amsterdam’s Museumplein.

    In the coach house, the original van Loon carriages are displayed. The family’s horses’ harnesses and liveries can be admired in the place where they originally were used.

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    Musuem van Loon, Interior, Part II

    by von.otter Written Jan 4, 2012

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    Musuem van Loon, Amsterdam, April 2011
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    “Those Dutchmen had hardly any imagination or fantasy, but their good taste and their scientific knowledge of composition were enormous.”
    — Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890)

    A marble staircase with an ornately curlicued brass balustrade leads up through the house, connecting rooms filled with mementoes, furnishings, portraits and paintings belonging to the van Loon family.

    The stairwell’s walls (see photos #1, #2 & #3) boast some very fine stuccowork.

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    Museum van Loon

    by Jarin Written Jul 23, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museum van Loon

    Adriaan Dortsman designed the double canal house in 1672. The van Loon family, a very important family in Amsterdam, after which the museum is named, came to live in this house in 1884 only. The first resident was the painter Ferdinand Bol, one of Rembandt's most famous pupils.
    Throughout the time the interior and exterior have remained practically intact, so you can see the house, its collection and the garden, where concerts are held.
    It is opened from Friday until Monday from 11 a.m. till 5 p.m.
    JULY & AUGUST 7 DAYS per week.

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    Museum von Loon

    by yooperprof Updated Aug 27, 2008

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    step right up!
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    18th century house museum located on one of the grandest canals in the Golden belt. Several grand state rooms, and bedrooms that reflect the prosperity of the upper bourgeoisie. Lots of gilt!

    Interesting to see how nice the back of the house is - in many ways, more grand than the front. Spectacular garden - that was my favorite feature. I love a good parterre!

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    Musuem van Loon, Exterior

    by von.otter Written Jan 3, 2012

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    Musuem van Loon, Amsterdam, April 2011
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    “Painting is the grandchild of nature. It is related to God.”
    — Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (1606-1669)

    SECOND NATURE The celebrated Dutch painter, whose middle name means son of Harmen, has an indirect connection with the van Loon house. Ferdinand Bo, a pupil of Rembrant’s, was the first owner of the house after it was built in 1672, designed by architect Adriaen Dortsman.

    Today, the Van Loon House Museum occupies this doublewide canal house. Willem van Loon co-founded the Dutch East-India Company in 1602 and Willem’s grandson was the first family member to be mayor of Amsterdam. The family moved here in 1884. The house was a wedding gift from Hendrik van Loon to his son Willem.

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    Musuem van Loon, Interior, Part I

    by von.otter Written Jan 4, 2012

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    Musuem van Loon, Amsterdam, April 2011
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    “I still stick to the Dutch pronunciation of the double o—Loon like loan in ‘Loan and Trust Co.’ My sons will probably accept the American pronunciation. It really does not matter very much.”
    — Hendrik Willem van Loon (1882–1944, Dutch-American historian and journalist) his response when asked by The Literary Digest how to say his last name

    WHAT MATTERS Museum Van Loon, the former house of the van Loon family, is situated in the historic Amsterdam canal system. Willem van Loon was in 1602 co-founder of the Dutch East Indian Company. The first owner of the house, Ferdinand Bol, was a student of the Rembrandt. Beautiful portraits, impressive pieces of furniture and silver and porcelain from different periods can be found in all the rooms.

    The dining room could seat 20 guests. One interior feature that I liked was the family portraits hung throughout the house, especially those of the children from the early 20th century. Their fresh smiling faces were a welcome contrast to their sour-faced, 17th-century ancestors.

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    Museum Van Loon

    by sinjabc Updated Mar 3, 2011

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    The museum is a fine and elegant canal home dating back to the early 1600s from the Van Loon family (Willem van Loon co-founded the Dutch East-India Company). The house is filled with portraits of the family members, fine furnishings, silvery and porcelain from different centuries. The museum showcases the splendor of the Golden Age.

    Admission is € 8.00

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