Enkhuizen Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Igraine
  • Things to Do
    by ATLC
  • Things to Do
    by ATLC

Most Recent Things to Do in Enkhuizen

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    history of the Sea

    by Igraine Updated Apr 4, 2014

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    Old wooden ship
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    The Zuiderzee musuem consist of two parts an indoor and an outdoormuseum. Due to the weather we didnt see the outdoor part. This is the nicest part though. There they have rebuild the houses and dwellings from about 1850 - 1930, to show us how it was. Because when the Afsluit dijk closed in 1932, the old life vanished quickly. In the summer time, people are "living" in this village.

    The indoor museum is also interesting and shows us, the struggle against the water, some whaling history and other shipping history.

    See more pictures in my t-logue.

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    Zuiderkerk

    by King_Golo Written Apr 21, 2013
    Zuiderkerk

    Zuiderkerk (also called Sint Pancras) is the most easily visible landmark of Enkhuizen. It's a beautiful church with an interestingly designed spire. Built from 1423 to 1524 in late Gothic style, the church is the centre of the legend of the "Greedy Lady". She is said to have had a lot of money, but when she was about to die she asked her maid to hide it from the family. She was to put it under the lady's head in the coffin which she did, but soon after the family enquired where their heritage was. Eventually they found out about the cache and opened the coffin. But instead of a treasure they found snakes and lizards aplenty and sulphurous smoke was coming out the coffin. The family ran away and later the grave was sealed. It was considered to be a warning not to be greedy.

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    The Harbour

    by King_Golo Written Apr 21, 2013
    Oude Haven
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    Always full of impressive yachts and antique ships, Enkhuizen's harbours (there are actually several) are a pleasant place to go for a walk. They are located as centrally as possible: Buitenhaven is just outside the train station, next door to the Drommedaristoren, the defense tower which was once used to guard the harbour is Oude Haven. There are a few cafes and restaurants close by as well. The other three, Buyshaven, Krabbershaven and Compagnieshaven are not as picturesque, although walking to the latter is a nice pastime as well.

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    Bottleship Museum II - How to build a bottleship

    by King_Golo Written Apr 9, 2013
    Not a ship, but the captain's cabin in the ship!
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    When you see a bottleship for the first time you will most likely scratch your head about its very absurdity. First of all, how did it get into the bottle? How is it possible that a ship of some 10cm height fits through a bottleneck that measures no more than 3cm in diameter? Second, even if they somehow manage to squeeze a ship through the bottleneck, how do they create the landscapes (or rather seascapes) around it? How do they chuck in tiny harbour cottages, detailed scenes of maritime life, almost realistic-looking animals and the like? Third, why would anyone in the world come to the idea to fit all that stuff in an empty bottle? In this tip, I shall try to answer these three questions.

    First and foremost, how does a bottleship get into a bottle? Well, that is basically the easiest part. The ship's body is first carved from a piece of wood, then equipped with the tiniest of holes so that the masts find a place later on, then fitted out with a set of very thin wires which are used to erect the masts. All of this, including the masts made from toothpicks and the sails made from shreds of paper, is then fixed to the body. The whole ship now looks like a piece of wood with a lot of untidy stuff on top of it. All of this must of course not be higher than the bottleneck's diameter. With the help of a few tools such as tweezers and bent knives everything is carefully shifted through the bottleneck. The bottleship builder needs to have very calm hands, that is for sure! Anyway, once everything is in the bottle, the masts are erected. By pulling one of the wires all of the masts go up simultaneously. This wire is now cut, and the bottle is sealed.

    Second, how does the landscape get in? We need to take a step back now, because logically the landscape has to be inside the bottle before the ship. So before we stuff everything in, we first paint the inside walls of the bottle using a bendable paintbrush of the most minuscule size imaginable. We then stuff a special kind of Plasticine into the bottle, press it hard to the ground and use a knife plus some more paint to create an image of a wild sea. Any fishing village scenes or the like are carved from wood and pressed into the Plasticine so that they will be fixated. Eventually, we do the same with our ship. The Plasticine mass will eventually turn hard and hence make the ship plus the landscape impossible to move.

    Third, why would anyone go for such a painfully fiddly kind of work? It was actually quite a favourite pastime among seafarers during long periods of lull. While the ship was bobbing on the waves, they grabbed any materials they could find on board and started building bottleships. I suppose that while there normally was quite a generous supply of rum bottles and the like, pieces of wood, shreds of paper and something similar to a toothpick could also be found easily. Naturally, the first of these ships were not as sophisticated as most of those in the museum. But they must have seemed similarly impossible to make to all those who stayed at home than they seem now to the uninitiated ones.

    If you want to know more and see a video of somebody building a bottleship, you ought to visit the Bottleship Museum.

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    The Bottleship Museum I

    by King_Golo Written Apr 9, 2013
    One of the

    The Bottleship Museum is one of the most impressing museums I've seen in my life. It's home to the world's largest collection of bottleships (in Dutch: Flessenscheepjes), among them the smallest bottleship that has ever been built plus lots of other incredibly complex specimens. A very informative video explains in detail how the ships or even whole landscapes end up in the bottle. Afterwards, you can try to figure out yourselves how they did it with particular samples of which the museum has some 1,400. The friendly and enthusiastic museum guides will show you some particularly important ships and explain about their technical details in case you're interested.

    While children and adults alike will "aaah" and "oooh" at the ships on display, they are not the only thing that is interesting. The building itself is a preserved "spuihuis", a house built on a sluice used to regulate the water supplies of Enkhuizen. It's a tiny little building with lots of character. Immediately after the entrance door you can still see the water through the duct which was part of the now disused sluice.

    See also my second Bottleship Museum tip, "How to build a bottleship".

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    No doubt about it: the Zuiderzeemuseum

    by ATLC Written Feb 25, 2013
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    This is definitely the museum to go to when visiting Enkhuizen. As a matter of fact, it is a highlight of The Netherlands, I kid you not. It's right there along the flower shows at Keukenhof, the WorldHeritage site Kinderdijk windmills...it shows you how life used to be in the fishing villages and towns a 100 years ago, a lot of Dutch culture, loads to do for children as well.

    Visit the website for all details and how to get there.
    The outdoor museum opens again on 29 March 2013.

    And here are some photos on my recent visits.

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    Sailing

    by Twan Updated Oct 22, 2012
    Sailing on the IJselmeer
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    The 17th century was the heyday of Enkhuizen. The city had the largest herring fleet of the Netherlands, and also possessed a chamber of the VOC. The West India Company was represented in the city. By trading on the Baltic Countries, England, West Africa and India was rich Enkhuizen. The city had 25,000 inhabitants, considerably more than the current number. In 1671, the road between Enkhuizen and Hoorn ready, the first in the province of Holland, with which the connection to the hinterland significantly improved.

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    Take the ferry!

    by nighthawk Written Apr 23, 2012
    On the ferry
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    At the outskirts of Enkhuizen is a huge car park, where you can park your car for a fee. Then go into some kind of transit hall where there is lots to look at, buy a ticket for the ferry and get on it!
    Why? So you can travel over water to the Zuiderzee Museum!
    It is a nice quiet trip, fun to watch fellow visitors, and it is also great fun to look at all the boats you pass. The city on the left greets you and soon the ferry will anchor and you get out and explore the museum!
    Real houses, real re-enacted scenes, a laundrette, candy store, and much more.
    Children love it too!

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    The Zuiderzee Museum..... canals

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Canals


    You can take a boattour through the canals of the museum, and I really loved the idea. But the tour starts only every half hour, and there are only a few people that can go on the boat.

    When I was there, the queue was very long and I didn't want to wait such a long time. I really was disappointed, until the boat passed me. It looks beautiful on the picture, but it is not as easy as it looks. The skipper was singing songs in Dutch and the whole boat had to sing along with him. Not so easy when you don't know the lyrics, and when you really can't sing like me :-) So I just watched them and smiled, relieved that I didn't wait to go with the tour.

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    Multi-media journey through the Netherlands

    by ATLC Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is fun!

    Your day begins at Waterlooplein in Amsterdam where a very special attraction awaits you: Holland Experience. When you arrive at 10 AM you are greeted with a cup coffee or tea and then conducted to an aircraft seat mounted on a moving platform. Then it's fasten seatbelts for a genuinely 'sensational' tour of the many faces of Holland. As you whizz through the Dutch landscape you will smell the fragrant bulb fields, feel the swell of the Waddenzee and sample the carefree atmosphere of Dutch ice culture. All this and more courtesy of multi-dimensional film and theatre techniques, smell and sound effects.

    After the performance you make your way by car or public transport to the Zuiderzeemuseum arriving around 1 PM, in perfect time to sit down to a delectable lunch in the museum restaurant, Het Amsterdamse Huis. The rest of the afternoon you are free to explore the indoor and outdoor museums on your own.

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    Walk around Enkhuizen

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2009

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    On one of the city buildings
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    This Town has some really interesting buildings and pretty sites. In Summer, the VVV (information centre) has 2hour walking tours. It also has maps for other times, when you go alone. There is St. Gomaruskerk, 16th Century with its Gothic Hall, and opposite it, the 16th century Old Mint. The Town Hall is worth seeing, and so are the Gothic Houses. I found nice canals, Outdoor Cafes, Parks, Museums, Statues and an interesting Antique shop.
    Its a great town for exploration, so leave yourself plenty of time to see the Zuiderzeemuseum as well as the Town.

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    Tourist Office & Harbour

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2009

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    The unknown Paddlesteamer
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    On arriving by Train from Hoorn, My 1st destination was the Tourist (VVV) office, which is located on the right side of the Harbour as you walk out the train station. Here I picked up a brochure (it was only written in Dutch) but it had a good map with all the importantsites & there locations in it.
    The Harbour is very pretty, and here I saw this Paddle steamer. I have tried to find details on it, but can't, so if anybody knows the history on it, please drop me a line. It was beautiful!

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    SAINT PANCRAS of ZUIDERKERK

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2009

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    Saint Pancras
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    This Church dates back to the 15th century, with the 75 metre high tower being built in 1450. Originally, it wasn't this high, but in 1526 the octagonal section and onion dome were added. It also has a 45 bell carillon. There are paintings on the wooden ceiling dating back to 1484. They were originally covered in whitewash, but that has since been removed.

    Open Mon - Friday 1.30 - 5pm Saturday 11 - 5pm
    In Summer, there are volunteers that will give you a tour.

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    ZUIDERZEEMUSEUM

    by balhannah Updated Jul 7, 2009

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    On the farm
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    This is one EXCELLENT MUSEUM.
    It is what I call an open-air Museum. Here you will find 130 complete old authentic Industries, Church, School, Homes, Farms, a Fishing Village all recreated so that you can see how people lived from 1880 - 1930, in the Zuiderzee region. They are all decorated in the Period Style. You can also see Craftsmen working at their industries. Sometimes they are dressed in Dutch traditional clothes.
    This is a large museum to walk around, and it takes quite a while if you have a proper look at all the buildings.

    It is open daily from 10 - 5pm
    ADMISSION in 2009 13euro adults, child 4-8yrs 7.8euro, family ticket 30 euro.
    This is one of the best Open Air museums I have ever been to.

    This museum is a MUST SEE.

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    Zuiderzeemuseum - FISHING VILLAGE

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2009

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    Lime Kilns
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    Around this area is a 1930's household, the Brush maker and of course the Fishing village & more. Nearby, are a pair of bottle shaped Lime Kilns that used sea shells as the raw material for making quick Lime.

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Enkhuizen Things to Do

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