Sluis Travel Guide

  • Sluis
    Sluis
    by zadunajska8
  • Sluis
    by FlyingDutchmen
  • Sluis
    Sluis
    by zadunajska8

Sluis Things to Do

  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo
    Church of St Johannes de Doper 2 more images

    by zadunajska8 Written Jul 23, 2012

    Back in the middle ages Sluis had two churches. One was demolished in 1605 and the other burnt down in 1811. That church had been protestant but they sold the stone to the catholics who built a new church in the town which was in use for about a century before being replaced by the current church built 1n 1925 to 1927 designed by architect J. Oomen.

    A sort of pseudo-basilica the church has three wide aisles and fells very spacious inside(in fact it's the feeling of that vast open space at the heart of the church that made the most impression on me). It is built in a neo-gothic style but with some more modern touches, such as the more modern (and restrained in a most uncatholic fashion) stained glass windows.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo
    The Belfort 4 more images

    by zadunajska8 Written Jul 23, 2012

    Just as every Dutch town should have a windmill, every Flemish town should have a belfry. Since Sluis is said to be "the most Flemish town in the Netherlands" it has both. This is in fact the only Belfort in the Netherlands but it is a fine example.

    Built in 1386 and restored in the late nineteenth century, only to be destroyed by Allied bombing in 1944. The Belfort was then rebuilt in 1956- 1960.

    In the tower is the wooden statue of Jantje van Sluis, Flanders oldest carillon player, which I assume is the Red and Yellow figure that can be seen from the street below.

    Google Map

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo
    De Molen van Sluis 2 more images

    by zadunajska8 Written Jul 23, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The windmill in Sluis is possibly the biggest attraction as far as buildings go (shopping is the overall main attraction here). No Dutch town would be complete without a windmill and so Sluis proudly shows of it's one remaining mill built in 1739 which was also the first stone mill built in this area.

    The flour produced from the mill is used in the brasserie downstairs and outside the windmill and is sold in the gift shop. The brasserie looked great but on the day we visited the whole town was heaving with people and there were no seats so we didn't get a chance to stay.

    Google Map

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Sluis

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

101 travelers online now

Comments

Sluis Travel Guide
Map of Sluis

View all Sluis hotels