Delfland water council house, Delft

6 Reviews

Oude Delft 167

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  • Delfland water council house
    by Gypsystravels
  • nice house..
    nice house..
    by truus_s
  • The substructure is actually an empty space.
    The substructure is actually an empty...
    by iandsmith
  • Mique's Profile Photo

    Dyke conservatory board of Delfland

    by Mique Written Feb 13, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Yep, i could live here ;-)

    Build in 1505 this building has seen some history. It started out as a private house but housed among others the Court of Holland during the rise of Holland. It also was the home for Filips, count of Hohenlohe who was married to the eldest daughter of Wiliam of Orange..

    In 1652 it got the function it has still today

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The tower, what it's all about

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 18, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The substructure is actually an empty space.

    This was the next thing to catch my eye.
    In the 19th century people realized that polluted drinking water could cause cholera and typhus. They then came up with systems for the distribution of drinking water. The water came from ´clean´ areas where it was filtered in a natural way. After yet another epidemic of cholera in 1866, large cities got their first water-supply system. The drinking water was stored in purified water cellars and from there pumped to an elevated tank.
    Delft got its waterworks in 1887. The water-collection area was the dunes near Monster, where a water tower was built. The loss of water pressure caused by the large distance necessitated a second elevated reservoir in Delft. It was decided to build a water tower on the site of the former bulwark near the Haagpoort, where the town cemetry was situated from 1829 till 1874. The tower was designed by the town architect M.A.C. Hartman, and is 29 metres high. It was built in 1895. The construction consists of brickwork and steel joists. The water was held in the cantilevered upper part: a riveted steel tank (contents 600 m3) with a double vaulted bottom. With its ring-shaped edge it seats at the body of the tower. Its neo-renaissance style is characteristic for that time. With its merlons and its beautiful green surroundings, the tower reminds us more or less of a romantic castle.
    Since the tower has been built, its exterior hardly changed. Inside a concrete floor and an iron spiral staircase were added in 1908. At the same time the pump was placed outside the tower. Because of the increased use of water, a purified water cellar (contents 1900 m3) was built next to the tower in 1918.
    Since 1921 Delft's drinking water has come from Rotterdam, and is purified Rhine water. The distance necessiated a second pumping-station. Up to 1996 the old water tower was used to regulate the pressure in the system, but it fell into disuse as reservoir much earlier, because through the years Delft needed more than 1250 m3 water per hour!

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  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Gemeenlandshuis van Delfland

    by ATLC Written May 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    DELFT GEMEENLANDSHUIS VAN DELFLAND

    This is the official name of the building and of the photo in the previous tip.
    It's luxury shows the power of the board that worked within: a council that ruled the polders and dykes.
    Water is so important in The Netherlands. There are various old and historical water councils that decide stuff about the water and everything that has to do with it. The council is an elected one.

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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    More remarkable houses along the Oude Delft (2)

    by Pavlik_NL Written Apr 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The wealth of the watership's governement

    Besides the "Wapen van Savoyen" another spectacularly beautifuly decorated house deserves your full attention. This huge canal house dates back to 1505 and was built by Jan de Huyter in late-Gothic style. Since 1645 it is the seat of the "Hoogheemraadschap Delfland" (= Waterscape society or "Dyke Conservancy Board of Delfland"). Water and waterlevels are of vital importance to the Dutch landscape. So important that already in medieval times special governements were formed to organise and control the water in various parts of the Netherlands. Delfland was a very important one and stretches out over a vast terrrain towards the sea between The Hague and Hoek van Holland (a very low and fragile part of Holland). Remarkable are the coats of arms of the various parts within this part of the Netherlands, falling under the protection of the Delfland Board.

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  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Architectural opulence

    by ATLC Written May 30, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    DELFT POLDER BOARD HOUSE DELFLAND

    Late gothic private house, most of it still original. Built in 1505 by Jan de Huyter. In 1652 the coats of arms of the members of the polder board were designed by Pieter Post.

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  • truus_s's Profile Photo

    Dike board"s office of delfland

    by truus_s Updated Oct 12, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    nice house..

    Built as a privatehouse..a like this house ...so beautifull to see!!Nice colors ..beauty for a photo.Every time when I come to Delft..I go to this house..Great!!

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