Fun things to do in Delft

  • Tower in the distance
    Tower in the distance
    by leics
  • From the rear
    From the rear
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  • From the rear 2
    From the rear 2
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Delft

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    Windmill de Roos

    by gordonilla Written May 30, 2006

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    The windmill is the last remaining of the 15 mills which were built into the perimeter of the defence walls of Delft. The mill and the adjacent living quarters is one of the most impressive monuments in Delft.

    "De Roos" is a tower grainmill with a stage and was built in 1679 and replaced a post mill which was destroyed by a storm. The living quarters were added in 1728, and the superstructure was rebuilt of stone.

    Many generations of millers have called "De Roos" their work and home; one of the more colourful millers was van Rhijn and he became the owner in 1860 and for more than 60 years, the mill was known as "De Molen van Rhijn". In 1926 The Dutch Windmill assocaitiontook over the running of the mill from the van Rhijn family. Three generations of the De Vreede family have lived and worked in the mill.

    Thanks to voluntary millers "De Roos" is still fully operational.

    The view from the street the platform and wheel the workings Darren leaving the mill Blue Flag flying means you can enter the building

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    Delft

    by smd3000 Written Mar 20, 2006

    There is so much to do in delf but you could also spend all day just wandering about and taking in the nice buildings ect........ I would recommend taking a trip up the tower of the church in Markt Square although it is a hefty climb up all the stairs so it does get tiring. Its the church where William prince of orange is buried. At night there are so many nice bars and restaurants to choose from but it your after a nice bar with a friendly fun atmosphere and also good food (although you may have to book) I would recommend cafe v its on voorstraat on the other side of the canal from the school but then again you can't really go wrong with any of the pubs.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Study Abroad

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    Cheerful Warfare

    by Rixie Written Dec 31, 2005

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    We went to the Dutch military museum (Legermuseum), which is housed in a 17th century arsenal, mainly because I had read on www.goholland.com that there was a section on the Dutch Resistance movement in World War II. If it was there, we missed it, and the teenager at the desk was perplexed by my question. In response, she pointed to the WWII section on the map, but we had already been through that section and hadn't seen anything on the Resistance.

    All of the labels and explanations on the exhibits were in Dutch, so we never did figure out what some of the exhibits were, e.g. the soldier in the gigantic gyroscope, wearing a stethoscope in his ears. There were two vintage newsreels in English, which helped. One was about post-war Berlin.

    The medieval section was a little bizarre: there were hands-on exhibits for children that made warfare seem cheerful rather than horrifying ("Crawl through the castle and see how many instruments of torture YOU can find!"). The maces and spiked clubs made me shudder.

    I'd like to go back to this museum someday with a Dutch speaker to translate for me.

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    TECHNOLOGY MUSEUM

    by nada.c Written Oct 28, 2005

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    If you are in Delft and your kids are with you, DON'T miss this.
    My child was delighted.
    This is not usual musem. It is interactiv. And your kids can play there.
    It is full of creativ games.
    You also can buy some of them.
    We all played together!

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
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    BEAUTIFUL HOUSE IN DELFT

    by LoriPori Written Aug 20, 2005

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    The following is a quote from the plaque displayed on this beautiful building. "Very large and luxurious late-gothic private house with stone facade and a nice turret. Built for Jan De Huyter about 1505. Since 1645 Seat of the Dyke Conservancy Board of Delfland. Coats of arms above the entrance designed by Pieter Post (1652).

    Dyke Conservancy
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    MARIA VAN JESSEKERK

    by LoriPori Updated Aug 20, 2005

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    This lovely church was located in the centrum. MARIA VAN JESSEKERK is a neo-gothic Roman Catholic parish church, originally named St. Joseph's Church. Built in phases between 1875 - 1882. Designed by E. Margry.
    Services held 10:30 en 18:30.

    Maria Van JesseKerk
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    MARIA VAN JESSEKERK

    by LoriPori Updated Aug 20, 2005

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    This lovely church was located in the centrum. MARIA VAN JESSEKERK is a neo-gothic Roman Catholic parish church, originally named St. Joseph's Church. Built in phases between 1875 - 1882. Designed by E. Margry.
    Services held 10:30 en 18:30.

    Marie Van JesseKerk
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    • Family Travel

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    NIEUWE KERK

    by LoriPori Updated Jun 2, 2005

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    Built between 1383 and 1510, the NIEWE KERK has strong connections to the Dutch Royal Family of Oranje. The present Queen Beatrix late husband Prince Claus is buried here.
    You can climb the 365 steps to the tower of the Neiuwe Kerk for wonderful views of the city.
    Entry fee is E 2,50

    Nieuwe Kerk View
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    • Family Travel

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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    From monastry 'til Animal Market

    by Pavlik_NL Written Apr 13, 2005

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    The square that you pass on your way to the Oostpoort is the "Beestenmarkt" and offers in summertime a sea of terraces where students drink and celebrate life (in stead of studying - haha). Here is where a monastry used to be. From 1449 the Franciscans were welcomed and allowed to built here their home. But the "beeldenstorm" (storm for the statues) in 1566 the monastry got damaged and the brothers moved to the "Vondelingenhuis" In 1572 they could return, but the reformation lead to tearing the buildings down in favour of a square that became used as the "Cattle Market". Soon the nickname "Beestenmarkt" (Animal Market) appeared. Until 1972 this kept going, after which it for a while was a parking. Now it has it's happy recreational function.

    The animal market has now coloured art animals

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    Johannes Vermeer, one of the great Dutch painters

    by Pavlik_NL Written Apr 13, 2005

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    Another famous citizen of Delft is Johannes Vermeer. This Dutch painter, that falls in line with the other great ones, such as Rembrandt van Rijn, Vincent van Gogh and Jan Steen, lived his whole life in Delft in a house on the Market and many of his paintings were made here and even showing pieces of Delft. Johannes Vermeer. His View of Delft is a famous portret of the town that then counted 25.000 inhabitants. More about him in a "local customs" tip on this page.

    Here's where Johannes spend his days at home

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    The Koornbeurs, centre of trading grane

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Apr 13, 2005

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    Near the town hall of Delft another old buildings stands in it's shade. this is the Koornbeurs (Grane Market hall) where in the past the grane was distributed after being sold. In 1295 Floris the Fifth granted Delft the rights to built a Meat, as well as Bread, markethall. This was usual in these times, when people started to become aware of the benefits of better hygiene, when these goods were sold in closed and controled circumstances. The original building however got damaged so much in the 1536 cityfire, that is was torn down and the present building in Dutch Classicistic style was put in it's place. After centuries of being the grane and bread centre of town, the building got a series of functions, such as: bicycle storage, commando centre (WW II) and even a mushroom cultivation house. After the worldwar the SSRD (a reformatorian student society) settled into the building and this lead eventually to the present pop podium that is situated within the old Koornbeurs.

    Here's where our daily bread also came from ...

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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    The fish is still sold overhere

    by Pavlik_NL Written Apr 12, 2005

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    Inside a squareshaped street between the Markt (Central Square) and the Old Church are strange low buildings that stand against the usual canalhouses that Delft has so many of. These are the "Fish banks" or the places where the fish used to be sold. Now-a-days still there is a "visboer" (litteraly translated this means "fish farmer", but we actually mean a "fish sales man") present . The variety changed enormously, but the price of the fish is ... high.

    The Fishbanks, where still the fish is sold

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    Remonstrants hiding out in Delft

    by Pavlik_NL Written Apr 12, 2005

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    After the main reformations, many subgroups and religious sects appeared around Europe. The many many ways that the bible could be interpreted lead to an equal variety of believes. One of them, the "Remonstrants" (followers of the ideas of Arminius) were exciled from the reformation in the Synod of Dordrecht of 1619 and had to hide out (just as the Catholics needed from these times. Crooked thing was still that the independance struggle within the Netherlands was also based on freedom of religion! In Delft the "Remonstrants" found a sheltered place behind the facades of the Oude Delft within an old malt-house (brewery). It still can only be found by going into a small alley and under a decorated top stone. The exterior of the building is very sober, though not as sober as other Dutch classic protestant churches. Through the years the church has been changed a few times in seize as popularity of the Remonstrants grew. They however always stayed faithful towards this hiding out location.

    Behind already beautiful facades are more secrets

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    Where the girl's used to wait ...

    by Pavlik_NL Written Apr 12, 2005

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    Besides the Saint Hippolytus or Holy Spirit chapel, a large house used to be the girl's orphinage (protestant). The chapel even belonged a while to it, when it was confiscated by the city as for it's Catholic heritage (reformation period). This function it also got later, though not only for prphins, but also for girls of which the parents wanted to "concervate" their daughter against bad influences in "the wild", to precerve a pristine state (of body) for the right marrital partner. As the attic rooms became rented to individuals, I put some questionmarks on the safety in these cases ... (-:
    Now-a-days the "Kennis societeit" (Knowledge Society), a part of the Delft University.

    The doorway to the girls, no, this is Delft !

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    More remarkable houses along the Oude Delft (1)

    by Pavlik_NL Written Apr 12, 2005

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    When we leave the church and look to the canal, on the other side there are two remarkable canalhouses that immediately draw your attention. The first one is the house "Wapen van Savoyen" (= Weapon of Savoie). The house was built in 1565 in renaissance style as the home of a rich traders family. In the facade a stone (1616) that tells about the Latin School that was in the Prince's Court and had a depandance here in the early 19th century. Now-a-days the city administration of delft has here their archives.

    The Wapen van Savoyen is a large rich canalhouse

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Delft Hotels

See all 20 Hotels in Delft
  • Hotel de Emauspoort

    It is a unusual hotel with a location in the middle of the town, and it has a very nice accomadation...

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  • WestCord Hotel Delft

    Conveniet to find, as it is situated next to the motorway/highway and IKEA. Do go and search the...

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  • Hampshire Hotel Delft Centre

    Koepoortplaats 3, Delft, 2612 RR, The Netherlands

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Families

    Hotel Class 1 out of 5 stars

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