Fun things to do in Delft

  • Nieuwe Kerk
    Nieuwe Kerk
    by iaint
  • western gable
    western gable
    by iaint
  • stylish
    stylish
    by iaint

Most Viewed Things to Do in Delft

  • Helga67's Profile Photo

    Beestenmarkt

    by Helga67 Updated Apr 16, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beestenmarkt (cattle market) is a very lovely town square with a couple of cosy grand cafes and bistros. When the sun is out, you can enjoy your drink on a terrace on the square.

    In the middle of the square you can see a funny statue of a cow, symbolizing the former use of this square (trading cattle).

    Beestenmarkt

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mique's Profile Photo

    Patricianhouse

    by Mique Updated Feb 13, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Build in the early 18th century for a rich merchant. Later used as school for Artillary and military engineering. Also used as military hospital.

    Since 1960 it is in use bu the international institute for Infrastructural, hydraulic and environmental engineering.

    It is quite a handsome building but almost impossible to get a decent picture of it. Since it is fairly big and the canals are rather small you really need a big-angle lens to even try to take a frontal picture. I obviously didn't have such a lens at that time and had to improvise..

    Patrician house

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nathalie_B's Profile Photo

    Delft Blue

    by Nathalie_B Written Jan 9, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Would you like to know how the Delft Blue ceramic is being created? Then you should definitely visit De Candelaer. You'll get a 10-15 minutes presentation about the work process. Very interesting!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mique's Profile Photo

    De Heilige Geest-chapel

    by Mique Written Feb 13, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Build in the early 15th century as chapel for the convent of the holy ghost . Used for many purposes in the 17th century including as arms depot. In 1924 its became the auditorium of the technical university but since 1972 its religous function has been restored. It is used for roman-catholic services and is called st. Hippolytuschapel.

    The chapel of the holy ghost
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    NIEUWE KERK

    by LoriPori Updated Jun 2, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built between 1383 and 1510, the NIEWE KERK has strong connections to the Dutch Royal Family of Oranje. The present Queen Beatrix late husband Prince Claus is buried here.
    You can climb the 365 steps to the tower of the Neiuwe Kerk for wonderful views of the city.
    Entry fee is E 2,50

    Nieuwe Kerk View
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    BEAUTIFUL HOUSE IN DELFT

    by LoriPori Written Aug 20, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The following is a quote from the plaque displayed on this beautiful building. "Very large and luxurious late-gothic private house with stone facade and a nice turret. Built for Jan De Huyter about 1505. Since 1645 Seat of the Dyke Conservancy Board of Delfland. Coats of arms above the entrance designed by Pieter Post (1652).

    Dyke Conservancy
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    MARIA VAN JESSEKERK

    by LoriPori Updated Aug 20, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This lovely church was located in the centrum. MARIA VAN JESSEKERK is a neo-gothic Roman Catholic parish church, originally named St. Joseph's Church. Built in phases between 1875 - 1882. Designed by E. Margry.
    Services held 10:30 en 18:30.

    Maria Van JesseKerk
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    MARKETS

    by balhannah Written Jul 5, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On arrival at the Market Square, I found a big Market. As it was later in the day when I arrived, some of the stalls were in the process of packing up. Evidently, it is held EVERY THURSDAY, and there are about 150 stalls. Also on a Thursday, is the FLOWER MARKET, which is at Brabantse Turfmarket in the inner city.

    Market stalls
    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    MARIA VAN JESSEKERK

    by LoriPori Updated Aug 20, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This lovely church was located in the centrum. MARIA VAN JESSEKERK is a neo-gothic Roman Catholic parish church, originally named St. Joseph's Church. Built in phases between 1875 - 1882. Designed by E. Margry.
    Services held 10:30 en 18:30.

    Marie Van JesseKerk
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • dila's Profile Photo

    Gemeenlandshuis van Delfland

    by dila Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    very large and luxurious late-gothic private house with stone facade and a nice turret. built for Jan de Huyter.
    largely about 1505. since 1645 seat of the Dyke Convervancy Board of Delfland. Coats of arms above the entrance designed by Pieter Post (1652).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    On arrival

    by iandsmith Updated May 6, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I must have come from Antwerp. The days were melding into each other but I guessed it must have been a weekday. It looked like peak hour in the afternoon. I enviously eyed off all the bikes as a possibility of reaching my accommodation. My, they do like their cycles in Holland. Still, with my bag that would have bordered on impossibility.
    Time to get my instructions out.
    I wasn't far from the main part of town so I started walking. I had a map, how hard could it be. There was the street. Okay, so one letter was different but that was obviously a typo.
    I zig-zagged down the cobbled streets and soon I came upon that leaning tower. Overlooking all else it amazed me that this piece of architecture hadn't received more publicity world wide.
    Out of the corner of my eye I saw the boat (see introduction). Well, the barge really, and it was full. Full of bikes and other assorted bits and pieces. Delft was going to be different because it was already different.

    Planes trains automobiles and bikes, lots of bikes Puts a new twist on being a street sweeper!
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Backpacking
    • Cycling

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    Windmill "De Roos" (The Rose)

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Apr 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Delft is one of the few towns that has still a windmill within the old centre. This windmill stood along the old citywalls and topped over them to catch the wind and produce it's grinded products. "De Roos" dates back to 1679, when it was built on top of a bastion of the remnants of the old citywall after the predescessor was destroyed in a storm. With constant restaurations and maintainance the windmill has been kept going until the present day. One can buy grinded products (but also endproducts with the help of the baker in the shop at the first floor. Another nickname of the windmill is "Mill of Van Rhijn" because this miller's family owned it intil 1926. Since then the windmill is taken under the protective wings of the Association of Dutch Windmills (Vereniging Hollandsche Molen) and is operated by the family Van Vreede that rent this location.

    The

    Was this review helpful?

  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Vermeer Center

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 27, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The legacy of Johannes Vermeer is celebrated in a scaled reproduction of the building occupied by the Guild of St. Luke just one block off the Markt in Delft. With no more than 34 authenticated paintings and perhaps 10-20 gone missing, his work is ranked with painters with far more existing works ( Rembrandt's and van Gogh's libraries number in the multiple thousands ). There are no originals here, but each work is beautifully reproduced with educational and enjoyable descriptions for each.

    Vermeer was a member and for a while a headman of the artist's guild in Delft. Guilds were trade organizations chartered by cities to govern all activities related to a specific trade, protecting the livelihood of its members from outsiders and settling disputes. St. Luke is frequently used as a name for artist guilds, as he is the patron saint of artists and is said to have painted the Virgin Mary.

    Vermeer was born to a humble Protestant background but married a wealthy Catholic woman, Catharina Bolenes, With a family eventually including as many as 14 children with 11 surviving to adulthood, guild obligations, and his painstakingly slow approach to his craft, he produced no more than 3-5 works a year for which no drawings or commentaries survive. His very early works were religious but at some point he moved into the house of his mother-in-law and most of his later paintings of domestic activities were from the same room at the front of the house with light coming from the adjacent window. Surprisingly little is known about his life. Oddly, considering the fame of his domestic scenes in modern times, his earliest fame arose from a cityscape of Delft (image 4). Painted only 7 years after the 1654 Deflt Explosion which killed over a hudred and wounded many more as well as destroying much of the city, it showed that Delft had recovered and rebuilt and was ready for business. His death at only 43 is stated to have followed a day and a half of 'frenzy', perhaps meningitis or encephalitis, although his widow left with eleven kids, ten minors, and no appreciable assets ( no 401k, no Roth IRA), attributed it to overwork and financial and family-related stress.

    Unlike with the self-obsessed Rembrandt, there is only one questionable self-portrait of Vermeer - from the early work The Procuress ( generally Vermeer avoided salacious topics). The Dutch Masters often portrayed themselves in a conventionalized manner - on the edge of the picture, facing out, with a fancy hat such as a beret, smiling, and holding a glass of liquor or a lute - The Procuress has them all - check the smiling man in the left upper corner.

    Vermeer Center Entrance Canal Across from Vermeer Center Entrance View from Vermeer Center to the Markt View of Delft

    Was this review helpful?

  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Vermeer Center - Works and Work

    by nicolaitan Updated Aug 13, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ground floor of the Vermeer Center houses the obligatory museum store, a small unpopulated cafe, and the service rooms.

    On the first floor, beautiful copies of each of Vermeer's works is accompanied by an informative description and discussion. Vermeer is acknowledged as the "Master of Light", the so-called Dutch Light, with the beautiful use of the famed window in his mother in law's house evident in so many of his domestic scenes but also in his "View of Delft". But as this floor demonstrates there is so much more - the emphasis is on love and the symbolism in his paintings. It is hard to remember all the details. As an example, in The Milkmaid ( in my Amsterdam Rijksmuseum review ), both the Dutch Stove and the heater on the floor have wide open mouths, symbolic of female spirituality and well-known in Vermeer's era.

    The remarkable third floor recreates a modern version of Vermeer's workplace with a discussion of his craftsmanship, again overwhelming in detail. His domestic scenes often seem simple, yet each is perfect in perspective. Some of his works actually show where tiny pins had been placed to guide the painting. His materials for paint are laid out, including the very expensive blue lapiz lazuli and aquamarine which he used more than any painter of his time. As a product of his era, when Holland was the economic center of the world, at least six of his works feature a map or globe considered marks of wealth for people of that time. It is said that his most famous and beloved work, the subject of a novel and a movie, The Girl With the Pearl Earring, also originally featured a map later erased.

    Allegory of Faith (image 3) is far from the most beloved Vermeer work, yet it like all the others has been sliced and diced by art experts and symboism freaks into the most minute fragments. The figure representing the Catholic Church is likened to that of Mary Magdelene in the background painting, The Crucifixion by Jordaaens, except she is obscured in the picture. Her right foot rests on a globe ( perhaps the same one as in The Geographer ) to show that Faith has the world under her feet. Nearby, Satan depicted as the Snake bleeds to death, crushed by a slab - the stone on which Jesus ordered Peter to erect his church. Even the ornate tile floor and the gold encrusted leather panel are felt symbolic of a scene from one of the clandestine RC churces. Nothing goes without comment in a Vermeer.

    There is so much to learn about Johannes Vermeer and his works at the Vermeer Center, and as one of my favorite masters, close to two hours passed in seeming seconds. And best, it is included free ( unlike much of Delft ) with the Museumkaart.

    Mona Lisa of the North The Museum Store Allegory of Faith The Workplace The Workplace

    Was this review helpful?

  • OlafS's Profile Photo

    Windmill De Roos

    by OlafS Written Mar 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Definitely one of the most impressive windmills in this country is De Roos, a successor of a windmill built on a rondelle in the town wall as early as the 16th century. This wooden mill was replaced by a brick one in 1679, of which the hexagonal substructure of the present mill is probably a part. A miller's house was built against the substructure in 1728. At an unknown moment, but before 1822, the upper half of the mill was replaced by the current one. Several restorations have saved the windmill from falling into decay.

    Delft: windmill De Roos
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Delft Hotels

See all 21 Hotels in Delft
  • Hotel de Emauspoort

    It is a unusual hotel with a location in the middle of the town, and it has a very nice accomadation...

    more
  • WestCord Hotel Delft

    Conveniet to find, as it is situated next to the motorway/highway and IKEA. Do go and search the...

    more
  • Bridges House Hotel

    Oude Delft 74, Delft, Zuid-Holland, 2611C, The Netherlands

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Couples

Latest Delft Hotel Reviews

Hotel de Emauspoort
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Hotel Restaurant Johannes Vermeer
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
China Hotel Holland
1 Review
Hotel Leeuwenbrug
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Hotel de Kok
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Soul Inn
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Campanile Hotel Delft
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Hotel De Vlaming
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Best Western Museumhotels Delft
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 5 Reviews
Hotel de Plataan Delft
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review

Instant Answers: Delft

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

40 travelers online now

Comments

Delft Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Delft locals.
Map of Delft