Nieuwe Kerk, Delft

4 out of 5 stars 41 Reviews

Markt, Delft 015-2123025

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  • Tower in the distance
    Tower in the distance
    by leics
  • Nifty gilded hat
    Nifty gilded hat
    by leics
  • Art Deco stained-glass
    Art Deco stained-glass
    by leics
  • robertgaz's Profile Photo

    Nieuwe Kerk

    by robertgaz Written Nov 10, 2005

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    Nieuwe Kerk from the Markt
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    The Nieuwe Kerk (New Church) is on the Markt and dates back to 1496. This church has the royal vault where the members of the royal family rest in peace.

    You can also climb the 108 metre high tower but the church is closed on Sundays.

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  • Nathalie_B's Profile Photo

    The New Church

    by Nathalie_B Updated Mar 20, 2004

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    Inside the Church

    The New Church actually is not so new, it was built between the years 1383 and 1510, but it got the name New since it is "younger" than the Old Church. Delft and especially this Church has a very strong connection to the Royal family. It is the place where William the Silent is burried, as well as present Queen's husband Prince Claus. All the Royal events are being held in this church, the next one will be the marriage of Beatrix' son Prince Johan Friso. Worth looking inside, especially at the monument which was added to the William The Silent's grave some time after he was shot. Very impressive monument is combined of 2 statues of the Prince and four other statues, each on one corner, that represent Liberty, Justice, Church, and Power!

    I created this page a few hours before the Queen Juliana passed away! Looks like the next event at the church is going to be the funeral instead of the wedding. Juliana died at the age of 94

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    Climbing up to the tower

    by Nathalie_B Written May 1, 2005

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    View from the top

    For an additional 2 Euro you'll have the chance to climb all the way up to the tower of the New Church. 365 steps will take you to the breathtaking view on Delft. On a clear day you'll be able to see The Hague and it's "skyscrapers".
    Climbing up the stairs is not easy. The serpantine stairs are very tiny and only one person at a time can walk. This is another reason why only 60 people are allowed to be at the tower at one time. The balcony on the top is also very tiny and can't accommodate many people. Some steps are still the same as they used to be when the church was built i.e. made of wood. It's kinda scary. Also, by the time you'll get to the top your head will be spinning, maybe it's a good idea to bring some water with you.
    On your way downstairs you'll be meeting exhausted people making their way up and asking you how much longer they have to suffer :) Nice, once a life experience, but I'll never climb those stairs again.

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    NIEUWE KERK -- STAINED GLASS WINDOWS

    by LoriPori Updated Sep 13, 2005

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    Nieuwe Kerk  -- Stained Glass Window

    The STAINED GLASS WINDOWS in the Nieuwe Kerk have been destroyed twice. The first time this happened was when a fire raged through the city in May 1536. The windows were destroyed a second time by an explosion in a Delft gunpowder factory in October 1654. It took almost three centuries for new stained glass windows to be installed, during which time the windows were partly bricked up and partly fitted with ordinary glass.

    The accompanying picture is of THE ZEELAND WINDOW. Coats of arms of the Prince of Orange, as Marquis of Veere and Vlissingen, of the Province of Zeeland and a number of towns in Zeeland. Designed by Georg Reuter.

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    NIEUWE KERK -- MAUSOLEUM OF PRINCE WILLIAM

    by LoriPori Written Sep 13, 2005

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    Mausoleum of Prince William

    In 1609 the States General gave the order for the construction of a mausoleum in honour of Prince William of Orange. This was built between 1614 and 1623by master builder and sculptor Hendrick de Keyser. The mausoleum was drastically renovated in the period between 1997 and 2001 as the marble had been seriously damaged by salts.
    The statue of the dead Prince is carved from white marble and is lying on a bed carved from the same block of marble. At his feet lies his faithful dog, who, according to legend, refused to eat or drink after the death of his master.

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  • Imaniac's Profile Photo

    New Church

    by Imaniac Written Jan 6, 2004

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    There are two main churches in Delft, the new and the old church. The new church was founded in the 14th century and was completed in the 16th century. It's also an important church because a lot of the members of the Dutch royal family are burried here, like William of Orange and Prince Claus. You can go inside with a ticket that also gives you entrance to the old church and climb the tower. A ticket costs 2,50.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Nieuwe Kerk

    by nicolaitan Updated Jul 4, 2013

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    This famous church, with the second tallest steeple in The Netherlands at 375 ft, is consecrated to St. Ursula, and faces the City Hall across the market square. By legend, the concept arose from the vision of a Delft beggar Symon in January 1351 who saw an image of golden church with Mary seated on a throne. A wooden church was erected on the site in 1381. The current church and tower were built around the wooden structure between 1396-1496 by the plans of van der Bosch.

    The tower contains multiple bells for the mechanical clock installed over 400 years including among others a 1662 bell still in use. The interior features a monument to William the Silent by Henrik de Keyser from 1608-19 and the burial place of Hugo Grotius all open to the public as well as the burial crypt for members of the royal House of Orange ( this not open to the public ). The stained windows are spectacular but too detailed to really appreciate. the chandeliers are a modern addition.

    The monument to William imaged here is comprised of four pillars with a canopy, built of black and gold veined marble and precious metals. Female figures symbolize freedome, justice, religion, and courage. His dog is also included - said to have starved itself to death after the assassination. A female figure at the foot holds two trumpets, one for glory and one for disrepute.

    St. Ursula also came to an untimely end. Fleeing her father and northern Europe ( what would become Germany centuries later ) after refusing to acquiese to a brokered marriage and lose her treasured viriginity, she led a pilgrimage of 1000 other virgins toward Rome. Captured by Huns, she refused a marriage to their chief for the same reason. She and her followers were then killed by a fusillade of arrows. Gather those rosebuds.

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    NIEUWE KERK -- STATUE OF KING WILLIAM I

    by LoriPori Written Sep 13, 2005

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    Statue of King William I

    A white marble STATUE OF KING WILLIAM I can be seen close to the Mausoleum of the Prince William V. Engraved on the pedestal is a verse from the Book of Wisdom. The King himself is depicted in a semi-recumbent attitude, resting against a lion, also carved from marble.
    Just above it, against the wall of the Church, a relief in white marble commemorates William George Frederick

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  • Mique's Profile Photo

    The New church

    by Mique Written Feb 13, 2004

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    William of Orange's tomb

    Although the new church is impressive in itself it is not that what it is most famous for. Since William of Orange's burial in this church it is the place where the Dutch royal members are buried in the crypt. You can't actually go there but when you've entered the church you can see next to the tomb for William, the entrance stone to the crypt and a lay-out of who is where in the crypt.

    Normally you can also climb the tower but this one is under renovation for the moment and at least till summer (2004).

    With an entrance ticket to this church (euro 2,50) you can also visit the Old Church.

    Both churches are not open for visits on sundays.

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    Nieuwe Kerk

    by ATLC Written May 30, 2003

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    DELFT NIEUWE KERK

    Hurrying out of the way of wedding guests, I turn around and face the "New Church" at the other end of Markt square.
    What's new about it? Nothing really. It's only because the other major Delft church the Oude Kerk (old church) is a bit older.

    The Nieuwe Kerk in late gothic style was built between 1383 and 1510.
    At the end of my walk I visited the church inside, but not just yet....

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    New Church

    by margaretvn Updated Mar 30, 2003

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    Nieuwe Kerk or new church.
    This was built between 1383-1510. it has been restored several times:
    in 1536 after fire damage and in 1654 after the arsenal explosion. A 100 metre high tower was added to the Gothic facade in 1872.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Life at the top

    by iandsmith Written May 7, 2007

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    It was comfortable inside the church as I viewed the stained glass and art works. I’d forgotten about the chill winds from the north and the splattering rain.
    I opted to ascend the steeple (for a price of course). Since I train and race push bikes I usually have no trouble on the way up and here was no different. What interested me of the 375 steps (3 were down at the clockworks - pic 2) was that the last 177 went in the opposite direction. Perhaps this was to avoid giddiness on the narrow sandstone steps.
    I still enjoy the atmosphere of the ascent, climbing through history up to sample a panoramic view. Here and there though small cracks whistled a foreboding of what was to come.
    As I stepped onto the narrow balcony (pic 3) the wind battered every part of my being. Up here it was gale force with intermittent showers of driven moisture. On the windward side photography was nigh well impossible though I managed to get some shots of my main objectives, the town hall and the old church.

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    Anna Pavlovna of Russia

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Apr 8, 2012

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    Eleven people are buried in the old vault, 35 people are buried in the new vault of the royal crypt.
    Grand Duchess Anna Pavlovna of Russia (18 January 1795 – The Hague, 1 March 1865) was a queen consort of the Netherlands.
    She was born as the eighth child and sixth daughter of Paul I of Russia and Empress Maria Feodorovna (born Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg), and thus was Her Imperial Highness Grand Duchess Anna Pavlovna of Russia. In the Netherlands, due to nineteenth century Dutch transliteration conventions, she is better known as Anna Paulowna.
    At one time, Emperor Napoleon I of France had asked for her hand in marriage and been refused.

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    The house of Orange

    by iandsmith Written May 6, 2007

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    Overall shot
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    I had ridden in from the hotel on one of their bikes. The weather was unkind. Unkind in a cold way. Since I race back home I'd ridden in lots of types of weather but, when it's cold, I'm usually prepared. Today I was caught out. My hands were a degree short of being frostbitten and my ears were stinging. Perhaps it was appropriate that today I was viewing a mausoleum highlighted by cold hard marble.
    I was in the Nieuwe Kerk viewing the resting place of Prince William of Orange aka William the Silent. Well, he certainly was now.
    Hendrick de Keyser, master sculptor, did this between 1614 and his death in 1621 when his son Pieter took over and finished it over the next two years.
    One interesting sidelight is that they had a fairly large budget overrun due to the statue repeatedly falling down.
    It was renovated between 1997 and 2001 due to salt damage of the marble.
    The dead prince's figure is carved, along with the bed, from a single piece of white marble and, at his feet lies his dog which, according to legend, refused to eat or drink after his master's death and died from hunger and thirst.
    In pic 2 you can see a bronze of the recumbent Prince in full armour beneath the coat of arms of the House of Orange.

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  • simonli625's Profile Photo

    Nieuwe Kerk ( New Church ) of Delft

    by simonli625 Written Jan 21, 2007

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    The Nieuwe Kerk is in the middle of the Markt. You can climb the stairs to the top and have a nice view of the whole town of Delft. It is the second highest church in the Netherlands. Only the Dom tower in Utrecht surpassed it.

    The Nieuwe Kerk was built in the 13th century based on the vision by Brother Simon and Jan Col who saw a golden church in the sky and a light shining on the spot of the current Church.

    The original church was built temporary by wood while the current basilica was built over a period of a century.

    The church has gone through quite a bit of disasters. It was hit by lightning on 1536 and 1872. A lot of the original Roman Catholic furnishing were also destroyed during the iconoclasm of 1566.
    Its wall was damaged during the Delft thunderclap on 1654. Almost 1/3 of the town were gone during that accident when ninety thousand pounds of gun powder exploded in the Delft powder-magazine.

    The Nieuwe Kerk has been the resting place for the members of the Royal House ( The House of orange) since 1584.

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