Oude Kerk, Delft

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Heilige Geestkerkhof 25 015 2123015

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  • The 'Liberation window'
    The 'Liberation window'
    by leics
  • Oude Kerk tower
    Oude Kerk tower
    by leics
  • Pulpit detail
    Pulpit detail
    by leics
  • Nathalie_B's Profile Photo

    The Old Church

    by Nathalie_B Updated Apr 30, 2005

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    Oude Kerk

    This Gothic style Church is the oldest one of Delft, the 75-meter tower of which is crooked quite a bit, well I should say a lot. Inside you can find several tombstones, almost 400 people are buried there, among them famous painter Johannes Vermeer. Don't expect anything huge though. Vermeer's tomb is the smallest one in the church. However, many other tombs are real marterpieces.

    Admissions: For 2,5 Euro you get to see both the New and the Old churches. You also get a nice brochure with explanations

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  • Mique's Profile Photo

    The old church

    by Mique Written Feb 13, 2004

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    Interior of the church

    This is the oldest church of Delft. The parish church dates back to 1200. In the centuries that followed the church was much enlarged. The tower was added between 1325 and 1350.

    And ever since the middle ages the tower is already leaning.

    In the church you can find the tombs of such famous dutch seafaring men as Peit heyn and Maarten Tromp.

    An entrance ticket costs 2,50 euro (2004) and that is a combined ticket with the New Church

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  • robertgaz's Profile Photo

    Oude Kerk

    by robertgaz Updated May 23, 2006

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    Oude Kerk from one of many canals

    The Oude Kerk (Old Church) was built way back in 1246. The famous Delft painter Johannes Vermeer has his final resting place inside the church.

    Visiting hours are -

    Summer
    3rd of April until the 30th of October
    Monday to Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.

    Winter
    remaining period
    Monday to Saturday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    OUDE KERK -- STAINED GLASS WINDOWS

    by LoriPori Written Sep 13, 2005

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    Oude Kerk Stained Glass Window
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    After the explosion in a powder magazine in 1654, the church no longer had stained glass windows. The crowning glory of the restoration between 1949 and 1961 came when 27 STAINED GLASS WINDOWS were gradually installed. The leaded windows of the Oude Kerk are regarded as the best work of the glazier Joep Nicolas. He made 25 windows all-together.
    The "Liberation Window" in the end wall of the northern transept was the first to be installed in 1956 and was a gift from the Delft City Council. The two windows flanking the tower, representing William the Silent and Queen Wilhelmina, portray the glory of the House of Orange. The other windows have Biblical subjects.

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    THE OUDE KERK

    by LoriPori Updated May 31, 2005

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    This is a beautiful picture of the OUDE KERK with its reflection in the canal. The Bell or Bourdon is located inside the 75-metre tower.
    Founded around 1200, the Oude Kerk is located on Heilige Geestkerkhof 25 in the centrum of Delft.

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  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Oude Kerk

    by ATLC Written May 30, 2003

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    DELFT OUDE KERK

    To photograph the Old Church is not easy as the streets are narrow and the buildings high. The harsh sun was a bother too.
    So here I have an impression of the tower.

    This late gothic church is from the 12th century. Indeed older than the Nieuwe Kerk! The tower is famously crooked and is nearly 2 metres from standing straight.

    One of the famous Dutch painters is buried here: Johannes Vermeer. He has immortalised Delft and himself with his brilliant paintings of Delft.
    And here is also the connection with my hometown Brielle because Maarten Harpertszn Tromp, the famous admiral born in Brielle, lies buried here too.

    I did not visit inside this church, this time. The exterior though is much more interesting and attractive than the Nieuwe Kerk. But more about that later.

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    Old church

    by margaretvn Updated Mar 26, 2003

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    Old church from Tower

    The church is originally from the 13th century but it has been extended many times. The beautifully carved clock tower is from the 14th century. The Gothic north transept dates from the start of the 16th century and it was designed by Anthonis Keldermans. The floor has many 17th century gravestones (watch your step - I fell while looking up and walking!!) These include Johannes Vermeer, Admiral Piet Hein and A. van Leeuwenhoek.

    The ticket for the New Church in Delft also allows you to visit the Old church which is only a short walk away. - more info to follow

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Oude Kerk - Graves and Tombs

    by nicolaitan Written Aug 9, 2013

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    van Lodensteyn Gravestone
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    Over 400 remains are buried beneath commemorative stone slabs at the Oude Kerk, some of major historic importance. This practise extended from the Middle Ages to the early 19thC with stones ranging from small to very large for family vaults. Gravestones indicated great family wealth as limestone and bluestone had to be imported. One could spend hours searching out favorite stones, but with the Vermeer Center just scant blocks away, a better investment of time is to find a few important stones and move on.

    Famous persons interred here include the naval heroes Piet Hein and Maarten Tromp from the 17th C and physician Regnier de Graaf. Johannes Vermeer, master painter and a personal favorite, died destitute and ended in the family vault of his in-laws. The plaques visible today have been placed within the last century.

    The astounding gravestone for the family vault of Joost van Lodensteyn, prominent local politician, and his family dates from the 17th C and features the skeletal figure of death staring at the world with empty eye sockets. Around his head the ouroboros, a snake eating its own tail and implying renewal after death. Beneath his right hand an overturned hourglass - time has ended for those beneath. Another symbol of renewal is the upturned burning torch rather than the traditional extinguished torch head down.

    Anton van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) is amongst the most famous subterranean residents. The inventor of the microscope, he was the first to see and study sperm, red blood cells and bacteria and is called the Father of Microbiology. His preparations made him also a pioneer in observing blood flow. And he was a well known local politician and is believed to have been a close friend of Vermeer ( handled his estate ). His 91 year life span was remarkable for the time - in his later years, he suffered from involuntary muscle spasms of the diaphragm and upper abdominal muscles, a condition known to this day as van Leeuwenhoek disease.

    There are enough gravestones at the Oude Kerk to keep one busy for hours.

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    Oude Kerk - Interior Features

    by nicolaitan Written Aug 4, 2013

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    The Interior
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    The Interior - the main chapel of the Oude Kerk is typicall of the Protestant Reformation, austere and absent extensive wall decor.

    The Pulpit - the highly detailed wooden pulpit dates from 1548, creator unknown. It features St John the Baptist and evangelists, beautiful work of art. Somehow the pulpit escaped destruction during the Reformation as most art and furnishing considered too Catholic were destroyed around it.

    The Organs - During the Reformation, organs were considered papal frippery and destroyed or damaged, but the congregation of the Oude Kerk became one of the first Dutch churches to again use an organ to supplement their voices, repairing the damaged instrument in the early 1600's.Today the Oude Kerk has three organs, the largest with 2832 pipes, built in 1857 replacing the repaired one and still in use each week for services.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Oude Kerk

    by iandsmith Updated May 9, 2007

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    The inside story
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    Originally a wooden building it has an official history dating from 1246. It was then that Bartholomew van der Made started rebuilding and extending the parish church and from then onwards the church bore the name of the patron saint of its founder, St. Bartholomew. Four building phases followed over the next 100 years, heralding in the current shape of the edifice, it was then the wonky tower was added though it was last restored in 1995.
    The angle towers (the four on the extremities) were replaced around 1900.
    The last picture shows the part where two unique bells hang, they are the Trinitas Bell (1570) and the Laudate Bell (1719).
    The Trinitas (sometimes called Bourdon) Bell is the most exceptional of the two with its 7 metre perimeter and almost nine tonnes of weight. When a hammer chimes the hour and half hour, this is the bell you hear.
    It isn't used at other times, except Royal funerals and such, as constant ringing causes such significant vibrations it might damage the building.

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    Assorted items

    by iandsmith Updated May 9, 2007

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    One of three
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    There's much to see inside the Oude Kerk apart from the stained glass. It has three organs. The main one, seen here, dates from 1857 and was built by the famous organ maker Christian Gottlieb Friedrich Witte. The three keyboards and 41 stops allow you to play 2,580 pipes!
    The second pic shows the mausoleum of Admiral Maarten Harpertszoon Tromp, designed by Jacob van Campen. There's detail depicted the naval battle in which he perished in the middle of the white marble pedestal where his head rests on a cannon and his body is stretched across a ship's rudder.
    The third picture is a detail from the pulpit. After the fire and the iconoclasts went through in the 16th century this was all that was left intact. It dates from 1548 and John the Baptist and five evangelists are depicted upon it.
    The fourth one shows one of only six memorial inscriptions intended to commemorate distinguished towns folk. It's clearly dated 1600.
    The last picture shows the tomb of naval hero Petrus Heinius, sometimes listed as Piet Hein or Pieterzoon Hein, and it stands in the main chancel. The plinth and statue were carved from a single block of marble. The coat of arms is listed in the guide book as being a black raven on a black gate against a golden background. In fact, on the tomb it's the white marble you see at the top.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    the old church

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 8, 2002

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    the old church

    The Old Church (De Oude Kerk) is just slightly older than the new church. It was founded around 1240 and it's Delft's oldest church: it's in romanesque style, I think. From far away it's really easy to recognise: its tower is leaning distinctively.
    Inside you can see the tombstones of many famous Dutch persons: the admirals Piet Hein and Maarten Tromp, the Delft painter Vermeer, and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, the inventor of the microscope.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Oude Kerk - the History and the Tower

    by nicolaitan Updated Aug 3, 2013

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    Overlooking the Canal
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    Entering Delft from the train station, the Oude Kerk dominates the background of the lovely Oude Canal with its slightly tilted 75m high tower. A small stone church occupied this site as early as 1050, enlarged by a civil servant Bartholomew van der Made in 1246 to include a choir and 2 aisles, coincident with the city receiving a charter and consecrated to St. Bartholomew. The tower and four turrets were added between 1325-50 encroaching on the adjacent canal which narrows conspicuously at the church site and for that becomes even more scenic. The land on which the tower was built could not support the weight and the tower is off true center by 2 meters despite restorative efforts. By the mid 14thC, the church was rededicated to St. Hippolytus, the martyr and antipope as well as the patron saint of Delft.

    Major restorations have followed the great fire of 3 May 1536 ( when lightning struck the Nieuwe Kerk ), the Reformation, the Delft Explosion of 12 October 1654 ( when the city's gunpowder store exploded ), the collapse of the entire floor in the 18th C, and a major fire in 1921 which closed the church for over three years. Through the renovations the turrets on the tower have been variously oriented perpendicular to the tower or to ground level.

    The Oude Kerk remains active as a church today with regular weekly services, also used for concerts and lectures. Its huge bell is sounded during major disasters and on the burial of a royal family member.

    Entrance to both the Oude and Nieuwe Churches is included on the same ticket for the same price.

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  • OlafS's Profile Photo

    Oude Kerk ('old church')

    by OlafS Updated Mar 9, 2004

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    Delft: Oude Kerk

    The Oude Kerk ('old church'), as its name suggests, is the oldest church of Delft. It has an impressive leaning tower in Flemish Gothic style and chapels and transept in rich Brabantine Gothic style. The church was built so close to a canal that a bridge had to be built to allow people to enter the church through the tower.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Oude Kerk

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Apr 8, 2012

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    Oude Kerk
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    The Oude Kerk (Old Church), nicknamed Oude Jan ("Old John"), is a Gothic Protestant church in the old city center of Delft. Its most recognizable feature is a 75-meter-high brick tower that leans about two meters from the vertical.
    Opening times
    The Oude Kerk (Old Church) is open for visits
    April 1 to October 30
    Monday up to Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
    Winterseason: Winterseason:
    remaining period
    Monday up to Friday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
    Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Feb-Mar Mo-Fr open 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.
    Adults € 3,50
    Group (min. 20 pers.) € 3,00
    Children (0 to 5 years) free
    Children (6 to 11 years) € 1,50
    Students (12 - 18 years) € 2,00
    Students (19 - 25 years) € 2,00
    Entrance ticket entitles you to visit the Nieuwe Kerk for free.

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