Churches, Leiden

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  • Ya gotta love Photoshop!
    Ya gotta love Photoshop!
    by garridogal
  • Pieterskerk - Leiden
    Pieterskerk - Leiden
    by pieter_jan_v
  • Marekerk - Leiden
    Marekerk - Leiden
    by pieter_jan_v
  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Hartebrug church

    by ATLC Written Jul 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    LEIDEN HARTEBRUGKERK

    Halfway Haarlemmerstraat is the Hartebrug church. One of the typical 'waterstaat' churches about which I explain at length on my Amsterdam page (Moses and Aaron church). It was built with government money because the church communities were too poor to do this. The reformed churches had confiscated the beautiful really old churches and so the catholics had to resort to new buildings once they were allowed to practise publicly again.

    The church front shows a Latin text saying: Hic Domus Dei est et Porta Coeli meaning This is the house of God and the gate to heaven. People usually call this church the Koeliekerk.

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    Citywalk: 10 Pieterskerk

    by tompt Updated Dec 26, 2005

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    Pieterskerk, hidden behind a tree

    Cross the bridge over the Rapenburg here. And enter into the Kloksteeg. This street is taking you to the Pieterskerk.

    The Gotic Pieterskerk was the main church in Leiden. From 1121 there was a chapel on this spot. It was the chapel of the Counts of Holland, in their backyard. The church, as it is now, started from 1390. The first tower was 120 meters high. It collapsed in 1512 and was never rebuilt.
    Due to the Reformation the church came into protestant hands in 1572. This meant all the rich catholic artpieces were destroyed. Only one altarpiece of Lucas van Leyden survived, it is now in the citymuseum the Lakenhal.

    The building is no longer in use as a church, but it is now used for cultural purposes.
    In the chuirch you will find the graves of many famous people, like the painter Jan Steen, the family of Rembrandt, and the leader of the Pilgrim Fathers John Robinson.

    The Pulgrim Fathers fled england, where they were persued for their faith. Leiden (as most of Holland) was very tolerant and like many other faiths they found refuge here. They lived here for 12 years. Then they became irritated by the tolerance that first sheltered them. They thought there was too much freedom here and moved to the New World (today USA) around 1620.

    During our citywalk the church was hidden behind buildingmaterial, as renovation is going on. But in januari 2006, we will visit a travelfair there, and make some pictures from the inside.

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  • garridogal's Profile Photo

    Pieterskerk

    by garridogal Updated Oct 10, 2006

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    I loved the inside of this Cathedral. Whenever I look at this picture I feel as if men in Top Hats and women in gowns should be dancing here!

    Update: September 2006 - Went back to Leiden and attended a wedding and it's reception here. Still no men in top hats but it was a beautiful setting and I've added some photos to prove it!

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    Citywalk: 18 Hartebrug Church

    by tompt Written Jan 1, 2006

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    Hartebrugkerk, Leiden

    Pass the Waag and go right over the bridge. Straight ahead you cross a street to come to the Haarlemmerstraat, the shopping street in Leiden citycenter. Right in friont of you is the Hartebrug Church.

    In 1830 centuries after the reformation Pastor Goffers still held church services in his hiding church in the Haarlemmerstraat. After the reformation catholic churches were forbidden in Leiden and the north of the Netherlands. But the churches went in hiding, they held services in dark attics. In 1830 it was long over, there was a freedom of religion.
    The Pastor wanted more space to receive more believers. He found a building in an other part of the street. But the building belonged to a protestant, he wouldn't sell it to a catholic church. Pastor Goffers used a friend to buy it. Then the story spread this friend was really buying it for the church. The pastor sent carpenters to the old hiding church, to keep up appearances. The protestant believed the old church ws renovated and the rumor was not true, he sold the building. In 1836 a new church designed by Th. Molkenboer stood on the spot . The motto in golden characters on the facade ( Hic Domus Dei est et Porta Coeli) mean: this is the house of God and the gate to heaven.
    Most of the time the church is open and you can see the classicistic interior.

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    Hooglandsekerk

    by Nathalie_B Updated Apr 16, 2005

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    Hooglandsekerk

    Hooglandsekerk is a really beautiful building. As it is seen from the citadel, the church is really impressive. It got its name from the relatively high location (Hoog) and it is really hard to miss it.
    The Hooglandsekerk was supposed to be a place for the Bishop of Holland, but this plan didn't work out.
    Comparing it to all the other churches it is really difficult to appreciate it from inside. It is simply empty. But the architecture is still amazing and I definitely recommend you to visit this church if you happen to be in Leiden.

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    Marekerk

    by Nathalie_B Updated Apr 16, 2005

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    Mare Kerk

    Leiden has many churches, but Mare Kerk is different from all of them in its interesting shape. It was built in 1639, 10 years later it got its beuatiful stone-gate.
    As you walk along the Oud Vest, along the canal, you won't be able to miss it. Pay attention to its impressive dome, it has the shape of octagone and each part gives your directions. And don't forget to pay attaention to the Marebrug (Mare bridge) if you go to church from the river side.

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  • garridogal's Profile Photo

    Hooglandsekerk

    by garridogal Updated May 5, 2012

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    I haven't had a chance to go into this church but I've walked by quite often as my friends live right down the street from it. So there's my endorsement! Not much in the area of descriptiveness but hey, here's a nice picture of it!

    And check out how pretty it looks when I used the "Find Edges" filter in Photoshop, on it! Looks like a card.

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    Harteburg - nice in any light

    by iandsmith Written Jun 20, 2007

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    By day....
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    When you arrive at Haarlemmerstraat, the shopping street in Leiden CBD, you will notice the Hartebrug Church.
    Centuries after the reformation, in 1830, Pastor Goffers still held church services in this church in the Haarlemmerstraat. Post reformation, Catholic churches were forbidden in Leiden and the north of the Netherlands so they went underground and held services in dark attics. In 1830 the Reformation was long over and a freedom of religion reigned.
    The Pastor wanted more space to receive more believers so he located a building in another part of the street. Unfortunately the building belonged to a protestant who wouldn't sell it to him (old prejudices die hard). So Pastor Goffers used a friend to buy it. Then the story spread this friend was really buying it for the church. To counter this the pastor sent carpenters to the old underground church, to keep up appearances. The protestant believed the old church was being renovated and the rumor was not true so he sold the building. In 1836 a new church designed by Th. Molkenboer stood on the spot . The motto in golden characters on the facade (Hic Domus Dei est et Porta Coeli) mean: this is the house of God and the gate to heaven.
    The church is open much of the time and features a classic interior.

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    ST. PANCRAS or HOOGLANDSE KERK LEIDEN

    by eden_teuling Written Mar 11, 2004

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    ST. PANCRAS / HOOGLANDSE KERK LEIDEN

    Walking through Leiden you will discover this wonderful red-brick church. Its name is St. Pancras church or Hooglandse Kerk.

    Churches here in The Netherlands used to be open to visitors all day but these days it is too risky because of thefts and other criminal acts so it is possible that the church will be closed, which btw won't be a problem: there will be an address where you can turn to in case you want access.

    In front of the church is a lovely old square where it is good to sit and rest.
    You will also see students going in and out of some University buildings situated near the church.

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    Marekerk

    by OlafS Written Mar 9, 2004

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    Leiden: Marekerk

    The Marekerk was the first church in the province of Holland specifically build for protestant services, although it's not the first one that was actually finished. Construction lasted from 1638 until 1649. It's an octagonal centralized building with a tall, distinctive dome and a pseudo-classical entrance. Architect was Arent van 's Gravensande.

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    Hartebrugkerk

    by OlafS Updated Mar 9, 2004

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    Leiden: Hartebrugkerk

    The Hartebrug Kerk from 1836 is a Roman Catholic church in neo-Classical style, designed by architect Th. Molkenboer. This church dates from a period when the catholics built many new churches. To understand this you must know that the protestants had stolen all of the old churches in the 16th century and were allowed to keep those in most cases after the catholic faith had become legal again in 1795. As some sort of compensation the government financed the construction of new catholic churches. To keep those as cheap as possible the Waterstaat-department (department of public works) supervised the design and construction, reason why churches such as this one are often called 'Waterstaatkerken' and the style is often referred to as 'Waterstaatstijl'. This however is a mistake; the style was internationally popular at that time, and not prescribed by the government in any way. Waterstaatkerken were also built in neo-Gothic style, for instance, but the name is usually associated with the neo-Classical ones. Typical for these churches is the inspiration taken from Greek temples and the lantern-tower at the front. The interior is often full of wood that is painted to look like marble.
    Architect Molkenboer designed more similar churchyes, and for a while was the country's major church-architect. Until the rise of neo-Gothicism. Within two decades after it was built the catholics regarded churches like this as 'pagan' and many were quickly demolished. This one survives, thankfully. It''s an interesting building. If not for its beauty, but it represents an interesting period of history.

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    St. Lodewijkskerk

    by OlafS Written Mar 9, 2004

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    Leiden: St. Lodewijkskerk

    The exact origins of the St. Lodewijkskerk are unclear. It may have been built in either 1477 or 1538 as the chapel of a hospital. After 1567 it served several profane purposes, including that of an inspection-hall for the cloth-industry, but was returned to the catholic community in 1808, by order of king Lodewijk Napoleon. The wooden segment on top of the tower dates from 1588 and was intended for one of the towers of the town-walls, but was placed here in 1593.

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    Pieterskerk

    by OlafS Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Leiden: Pieterskerk

    The Gothic Pieterskerk is a good example of the mixture of Brabantine Gothicism and local common sense, as found in many cities along Holland's coast. To prevent the building from sinking in the moist soil the building is unusually wide and has a wooden ceiling instead of stone vaults. Construction of this church was started in 1390. A 130 metres tall tower collapsed in 1512 and was not rebuild. The church came in protestant hands in 1570, but is no longer used as a church. Inside are the graves of many famous people, including that of painter Jan Steen.

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    Hooglandse kerk

    by OlafS Updated Mar 9, 2004

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    Leiden: Hooglandse kerk

    The castle hill allows an excellent view at the Hooglandse kerk or St. Pancratius. This is really something very special and not to be missed. You can clearly see how people had begun to replace a small Romanesque church by a much bigger and taller Gothic one. And then, all of a sudden, work stopped, when only the choir and transept had been completed. The nave and tower of the old church are now dwarfed by the huge eastern part of the church. The combination of a Romanesque nave and tower and a Gothic choir is not unusual, but the contrast between the two parts of this church is really unique.

    Strangely, inside I noticed nothing special. You would expect this to be visible there as well, but I didn't see it.

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    The Marekerk

    by pieter_jan_v Written May 19, 2013
    Marekerk - Leiden
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    The Marekerk church was constructed from 1639 till 1649. The design is by Arent van 's-Gravesande. The construction was supervised by Arent's trainer Jacob van Campen.
    The sand stone main entrance at the Lange Mare dates from 1657. The building is octagonal, because it was the first Dutch church designed for a protestant service with a central pulpit.

    The organ made by Pieter de Swart dates from 1560 and first was part of the Pieterskerk; in 1733 the organ was moved to the Marekerk.

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