Windmill, Leiden

19 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Windmill De Valk - Leiden
    Windmill De Valk - Leiden
    by pieter_jan_v
  • Windmill De Put - Leiden
    Windmill De Put - Leiden
    by pieter_jan_v
  • De Herder windmill - Leiden
    De Herder windmill - Leiden
    by pieter_jan_v
  • rsilva's Profile Photo

    Molen de Valk

    by rsilva Written Apr 13, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in 1743, this is the only of the city's original 19 mills that still exists. It is/was a corn-grinding windmill and is now home to a museum.
    It is open from Tuesday through Saturday from 10.00 to 17.00. Sundays and holidays 13.00 to 17.00.

    For the lazy people that don't like maths, the mill celebrated its 262th anniversary in 2005.

    Was this review helpful?

  • rsilva's Profile Photo

    Molen de Put

    by rsilva Written Apr 13, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This mill was built on the location of a previous mill, but it only dates back to 1987.

    It is, in my opinion, not as beautiful as the "de Valk" mill, but worth a visit nevertheless.

    Located right next to the Moorsport, one of the original entrances to the city and across the place where Rembrand was born, it is just a short walk from the station and the center/shopping area.
    Right next to the windmill, you have "Park de Put", a small park with a war memorial.

    Was this review helpful?

  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Windmill De Put

    by ATLC Updated Jul 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    LEIDEN WINDMILL DE PUT

    This is a replica of the windmill that stood here in Rembrandt days in the 17th century. Rembrandt was born in the street just across the bridge which is also a reconstruction.
    It has a little playground in front of it and a war memorial to WWII.
    Isn't it just postcard-pretty?

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Windmill De Valk - museum

    by ATLC Written Jul 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    LEIDEN WINDMILL DE VALK

    This is taken on the bridge between Morsstraat and Haarlemmerstraat and opposite Beestenmarkt.
    Windmill De Valk (the falcon) is seen here in the background.
    That windmill can be visited and shows you how grain is grinded (which it did until 1925). It is now a museum about Dutch milling and I went here around 1970, remembering climbing the wooden stairs and ladders as a 6 year old.
    The details below are for the mill museum.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Citywalk: 22 Windmill de Put

    by tompt Written Jan 4, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Follow the water further and you will find yourself at the foot of windmill de Put.

    This windmill is a replica of the wooden cornmill built in 1619 by Jan Janszoon Put. Across the water in the Weddesteeg, the then 13 year old Rembrandt van Rijn lived. His parents had a similair windmill. A drawbridge connected the two windmills. At the walls surrounding Leiden there were 19 of these windmills. And in early sketches of Rembrandt you can find several of these windmills.
    In 1640 the windmill de Put was destroyed by fire. But it was soon rebuilt. In 1729 the wooden windmill was replaced by a stone one like windmill de Valk (see general tips). It was demolished in 1817. It took untill 1987, before another windmill was built here. It is a replica of the first one. The windmill is special because the windmill as a whole turns around to get a good wind and not only the top end.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • garridogal's Profile Photo

    De Put Windmill

    by garridogal Written Dec 3, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A classic!
    2 more images

    I was so happy to finally see some Windmills. When I went to Amsterdam last year I didn't see any. Saw plenty on the ride from the airport to Leiden and De Put is one of the two that can be found in Leiden.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Windmill De Valk

    by pieter_jan_v Written May 7, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Windmill De Valk - Leiden
    4 more images

    Windmill de Valk is Leiden's mill museum since june 1966.
    The windmill was the third windmill build on this location and it dates from 1743.

    Opening hours:
    Mo: Closed
    Tu-Sa: 10AM - 5PM
    Su: 1PM - 5PM

    Admission: € 4.00 (adult)

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Windmill De Put

    by pieter_jan_v Written May 7, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Windmill De Put - Leiden
    4 more images

    Windmill De Put was build by Jan Janzoon Put in1618 at the Galgewater. Across the water stood a similar windmill owned by Rembrandt's parents. The Put has been painted by Rembrandt and can be seen in his earliest works. The Put burned down in 1640, but was quickly rebuild.
    In 1729 De Put was repleced by a much bigger one called De Korenbloem; this mill was in service till 1817. The mill was demolished due the the expansion af the Morspoort military barracks.
    In 1981 the barracks were replaces by family housing and a nice park and in 1987 the original windmill was rebuild in 1987.

    Opening hours:
    Mostly on Saturdays: 11AM - 5PM

    When open souvenirs and several kinds of flour are for sale.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mique's Profile Photo

    De Put (the Well)

    by Mique Written Feb 18, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    De Put

    Leiden used to have 19 mills inside its city boundaries. Today there are only 2. The Put is a reconstruction of a mill that used to be here in the 17th century

    The mill is open on saturday from 11-18 h and on sunday from 14-18h

    Was this review helpful?

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Windmill De Herder

    by pieter_jan_v Updated May 6, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    De Herder windmill - Leiden

    Windmill De Herder is a wood saw mill. The mill dates from 1884 and started its life as "De Kat" at Amsterdam. The mill is a replacement for the earlier Paltrok type mill, that was hit by lightning.

    The mill was in service till 1926. In that year an ellectrical engine raplaced the wind power.

    In 1965 the mill was renovated and once more in 2000.
    The mill sometimes is in service.

    Visiting only on appointment or when the mill is in operation.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Going Dutch - Molen de Put

    by iandsmith Updated Jun 20, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A pleasing scene
    1 more image

    I found this whole scene aesthetically pleasing with the windmill situated adjacent to the bridge. My only disappointment was that this mill was only 20 years old when I viewed it in 2007 though it had been constructed where another mill had been before.
    It is a replica of the wooden cornmill built in 1619 by Jan Janszoon Put.
    Rembrandt's parents had a similair windmill. A drawbridge connected the two windmills. At the walls surrounding Leiden there were 19 of these windmills. In early sketches done by Rembrandt you will note several of these windmills. In 1640 Der Windmolen de Put was destroyed by fire though it was soon rebuilt. In 1729 the wooden one was replaced by a stone one like windmill de Valk but It was demolished in 1817. That was the history before this one. It is a replica of the first one though with a twist as the windmill as a whole revolves to take best advantage of the wind.
    The Moorsport, one of the original entrances to the city, lies on the other side of the bridge and there's a park with a war memorial next to the windmill as well.
    Molen is Dutch for "mill" and, obviously, the rest means "of Put".

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • eden_teuling's Profile Photo

    THE VALK DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR: HISTORY....

    by eden_teuling Written Mar 11, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    WINDMILL DE VALK LEIDEN

    On 12 May 1940, the De Valk mill was established as an observation post by the Dutch military but the capitulation followed only two days later.

    The mill was fired upon from the air during the preceding wartime hostilities, leaving bullet holes in the cap and in the walls.

    Following the capitulation, the mill once again had to grind grain for the locals as well as for the occupying forces and strict controls were carried out. Wheatmeal was soon only available by ration and after 1943 it became so scarce that rye and wheat had to be mixed together.

    During the so-called hunger winter of 1944-1945, many people had their own limited supply of (illegal) grain ground, something which the Germans turned a blind eye to.

    This was not powered by wind incidentally but by electrically driven millstones.
    They also ground illegally for the resistance and any seized provisions were concealed in the mill. During this period, in which fuel was also scarce, almost all of the wooden parts (the tail-pole, props, gallery, etc.) were dismantled and used to fire the stoves.

    The mill was in a deplorable state after the war but the local council fortunately recognised its cultural historical importance and funded a thorough restoration in 1947.
    With the exception of Willem van Rhijn and both of his sisters, all the people that had taken residence in the mill over the years were eventually forced to leave due to the risk of fire.

    The 2nd WORLD WAR was a terribly awful 5 years for us, people and....this windmill e.g., but we survived the occupation!

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    On arrival

    by iandsmith Written May 29, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Windmill off the port bow

    From the train station it's fairly obvious that Leiden, as with many European cities, has the old town and the new town.
    As you alight and head towards the old town, as I suspect most tourists do, you'll note that the bus interchange is nice and handy. Well, it would have been handy it only I'd known where I was going and therein lies a problem.
    I asked people where the Tourist Information Centre was then walked to the area indicated and still couldn't see it. In fact, it was a couple of asks and someone actually showing me before I found it - after having walked past it three times! You see, unlike most other places, Leiden chooses not to use the international symbol for tourists, the capital "I", but instead uses the Dutch triple v, something I hadn't come across before.
    Once I had my map I took a few short steps and couldn't help but notice a windmill in the distance. It turns out that it's a tourist windmill and, since I was a tourist, I gravitated over towards it. Naturally enough, with my luck, it was closed but still made for a nice picture.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • eden_teuling's Profile Photo

    WINDMILL DE VALK LEIDEN.....

    by eden_teuling Updated Mar 11, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    WINDMILL DE VALK LEIDEN

    Once upon a time there were 19 windmills built on the city walls of Leiden, a wonderful view and landmark for travellers, but only De Valk is still standing today.

    The present mill has had two predecessors. In 1611, the post mill 'De Valck' was built upon the Valkenburger bulwark and later made way for a wooden tower mill in 1667.

    In 1743, the city council granted permission for the construction of an even taller tower mill but this time made of stone. This is the current 29-metre high mill known as 'De Valk', the body of which took only three months to build.

    The mill used no fewer than four millstones which provided considerable capacity. As a result of the depopulation of Leiden and the introduction of motorised grinding equipment, the mills found themselves in an increasingly vulnerable position at the end of the 19th century when many were dismantled. De Valk, however, continued to produce flour until well into the 20th century, although this was not powered by wind during the final years.

    Always a pleasure to see, hear and visit a windmill.......and this is a GREAT one!

    OPEN: Tuesdays through Saturdays 10AM - 5PM
    Sundays 1PM - 5PM

    The miller is Mr. H. van der Lelie

    Was this review helpful?

  • richard4's Profile Photo

    THE DE VALK WINDMILL,LEIDEN

    by richard4 Updated Apr 19, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the de valk windmill,leiden

    windmills such as leidens de valk were one of the main reasons to visit the netherlands,granted i'm a bit touristy,but that's why you travel to go and look at new places is it not.
    de valk is a totally cool landmark,it's distinct profile can be seen all over town,it is a very impressive structure that fits it's surroundings.

    at time of visit the entrance fee to go to the top of the windmill to get panoramic views of leiden was 2 euros 50 cents,
    the views are great and you can get to see inside how all the cogs and gears work,a family friendly outing.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Leiden

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

115 travelers online now

Comments

View all Leiden hotels