Fun things to do in The Hague

  • Het Binnenhof
    Het Binnenhof
    by a5floor
  • Het Binnenhof
    Het Binnenhof
    by a5floor
  • Het Binnenhof
    Het Binnenhof
    by a5floor

Most Viewed Things to Do in The Hague

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    the town hall

    by MATIM Written Feb 7, 2008

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    From the Middle Ages The Hague has consisted of two parts, each with a character all of its own: the earl's Court with the prosperous areas around Hofvijver and Lange Voorhout, and the village of Die Haeghe, around the Grote Kerk and the town hall, where the commoners lived. The town hall, built on the cellars of the medieval Hof van Brederode, is one of the first examples of the Renaissance in the north of Holland. The richly decorated facade features the maxim: 'Ne Jupiter Quidem Omnibus' - even Jupiter cannot please everyone. The sculptures above the middle represent Justice and Caution, with the stork of The Hague and a Latin maxim which, freely translated, means 'one man's fault is another man's lesson'. The building was restored between 1968 and 1975 and a council chamber was added. These days the former town hall is only used for marrying people.

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    Palace Noordeinde

    by MATIM Written Feb 7, 2008

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    Noordeinde Palace has always been the residence of the reigning Stadtholder or monarch. The first inhabitant was Louise de Coligny, the last wife of William the Silent. In the 17th century, Frederik Hendrik and Amalia van Solms had the Huis ten Bosch Palace built. Both palaces were in use until the beginning of the French rule, but from that time until World War II only Noordeinde Palace was used as a residence. During World War II Queen Wilhelmina lived in England. The palace was slightly damaged during the war.

    After Queen Wilhelmina's return she lived in a number of villas in Nieuwe Parklaan. Her daughter, Queen Juliana, never lived in Noordeinde Palace. Until 1977 the palace housed the Institute of Social Studies, but after drastic renovations Queen Beatrix chose to use this palace as her place of work in 1984. Left of Noordeinde Palace is number 66, the house where Crown Prince Willem-Alexander and Máxima Zorreguieta lived before estate 'De Horsten' became their residence.

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    Het Binnenhof

    by swetluska Updated May 31, 2007

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    Het Binnenhof, buildings of Parliament, has always been the centre of politics in the Netherlands. The buildings themselves well worth seeing, but it was here that the most important events in Dutch history took place.

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    Escher Museum

    by leplaya Updated Apr 19, 2006

    This museum goes through the life of M.C. Escher through his artwork. It is located in the Lange Voorhout Palace, a mansion from the 1700's. As a big fan of Escher's it was great to get some context into his work. Prints as well as actual cutouts of his work are displayed. There is a lot to see here, so give yourself at least 1 1/2 hours. If you are a fan, I'd plan some more time. The tour completes with a 3D virtual reality tour into Escher's artwork. I would say that this is one of the highlights of The Hague.

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    The Grenadierspoort

    by al_mary Updated Feb 13, 2006

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    The Grenadierspoort or Grenadier's Gate,
    was built in 1634, and is situated diagonally
    opposite the Mauritshuis, and is the main
    entrance to the Binnenhof.

    The Ministry of Public Affairs, address at
    Binnenhof 18-19, has its offices in the
    Binnenhof, along the Hofvijver (Court Pond)
    behind Grenadiers's Gate on the right.
    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    A large part of this section, in Neo-Renaissance style, dates from 1913
    but some parts are older, such as the famous Treveszaal (Treves Hall),
    dating from 1697 in Louis XIV style and the octagonal, 15th century turret
    at the corner of the Hofvijver, where the Prime Minister has his office.

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    Binnenhof / Ridderzaal / Rolgebouw

    by al_mary Updated Feb 13, 2006

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    This is anothr "must to see"
    when visiting in Den Haag.
    We highly recommend that
    you not miss it.

    The Binnenhof is a collection
    of very old historical buildings
    in the Hague that has survived
    over many centuries.
    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    It has been the location of meetings of the Staten Generaal,
    the Dutch Parliament since 1446, and has been the centre of
    Dutch politics for centuries.

    The grounds on which the Binnenhof now stands was purchased
    by Count Floris IV of Holland in 1229, where he built his mansion.
    More buildings were constructed around the court, several of which
    are well known in their own right, such as the Ridderzaal, the great
    hall or Knights Hall, where the queen holds her annual speech.

    One of the towers, simply known as het Torentje, the small tower,
    has been the working space of the Prime minister of the Netherlands
    since 1982.

    This is also the site where statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt
    was executed in 1619.

    This complex housed the local government as early as the 15th century.
    In 1585, it became the seat of the States General of the Republic of the
    Seven United Netherlands ......

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    Galerij Prins Willem V Museum

    by al_mary Updated Feb 13, 2006

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    Galerij prins Willem V
    (Prince William V Gallery)

    All the walls in the space are
    covered from floor to ceiling with
    paintings from the collection of
    Prince Willem V.

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    His private collection formed the basis of the present collection of
    the Mauritshuis and represents the Dutch Golden Age in painting.

    This is another "must to see", mainly because the Galerij was in
    fact the first museum in the Netherlands ......

    The Galerij also gives expression to the royal history of The Hague
    It is practically the archaeological foundation of the long running
    Dutch tradition of private project development.

    The Galerij of Prince Willem V is of great importance for museological
    history as well, from the 18th century on, the collection has been open
    to the public from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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    The Binnenhof ('Inner Court')

    by Dutchnatasja Written Dec 14, 2005

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    The Binnenhof (‘Inner Court’) is the seat of the Dutch government. There have been government buildings at this location since the 13th century. It used to be the residence of the Counts of Holland, and today it is home to the Parliament.

    Some history about The Binnenhof:

    In the 17th century when The Hague was government center (and there for capital) of the Republic, the walls were replaced by buildings. A Palace for the Prince of Orange, who was the Stadhouder (militairy commander and head of state), and official buildings for the Governments of Holland and the Republic.

    Unlike most of todays Republics the Netherlands had a Prince (the Orange family) as head of state (called Stadhouder ["Steward"] ). There were no elections by the people but the real power was in the hands of the Cities. The richer the city, the more power. The Hague was not a city itself, because the old and mighty cities of the Country prevented it from becoming one (until 1806), so The Hague wasn't allowed to build citywalls and towers until the 17th century. And when The Hague finally got permission to build walls in the 16th century it decided to build a cityhall instead and 50 years later, when Prince Maurits of Orange urged The Hague to build walls there was no money.

    So the only walls had been around the castle. The Hague's local government did not have a vote in the Government of Holland. Dordrecht, Amsterdam, Leiden, Delft and Gouda (to name a few) did.

    Today, when we mention the "Binnenhof" we mean the governmentcenter of the country, including the Buitenhof, courtpond (a former dune lake), the Prisongate and all other gates and buildings around the Binnenhof.

    Het Binnenhof (Inner Court), The Hague
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    The Hague Tourist Information Office

    by Dutchnatasja Written Nov 25, 2005

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    First thing to do is going to a Tourist Information center. They can help you with everything you want to know about The Hague. For example:

    • information about transport and accommodation
    • reservations for hotels and guesthouses
    • cheap packages
    • theatre and concerts tickets
    • discount tickets to Madurodam, Duinrell, National Sea Life, and much more
    • unique gifts
    • day trips
    • city walks
    • tickets for public transport
    • telephone cards

    The Hague Tourist Information Office
    Den Haag Marketing
    Address: Koningin Julianaplein 30
    2595 AA Den Haag
    Phone: (+31) (0)70 363 56 76
    Fax: (+31) (0)70 347 21 02

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    No ordenary rose: Westbroekpark

    by dutchboycalledjan Written Sep 19, 2005

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    Westbroekpark is one of the best parks in The Hague. The main attraction are their rose gardens that feature a contest every year. This is an international contest and some of the loveliest rosen bloom in large beds. The parks also has fine grass, a place for children to play, a restaurant and, its best kept secret, a lovely tea house. The tea house serves very good coffee, tea and drinks and buys its bakery from the best patiseries in The Hague. Here you can also rent a rowing boat (one has been called 'Titanic').
    The park has been landscaped on a terrain were there used to be dunes. The sand was used for building purposes. The ground is very level, just above the ground water level. This is ideal for many plants, like roses. Also, as it is fairly deep and steep to the North West and open to the south, there is not much windand a lot of sunshine.

    The rose garden, as promissed The tea house and the boats

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    Modern Architecture in Den Haag

    by Airpunk Written Sep 14, 2005

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    East to the central train station you can find some modern buildings making you feel that you are in some part of Rotterdam. The buildings are usde for different purposes, mostly business, living or governmental purposes. Among them is the ministry of foreign affairs which is shown on the picture. The dutch flag is set on half-mast because it was shortly after the death of Wim Duisenberg.

    Ministry of foreign affairs
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    De Plaats - More Cafés and Johan de Witt

    by Airpunk Written Sep 13, 2005

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    De Plaats is a square in the city cneter, near the Buitenhof/Binnenhof and the Hofvijver. It as a place surrounded by small shops and cafés. The most remarkable sculpture in this place is the one of Johan de Witt, one of the most importnat statesmen in dutch history. He was killed in 1672 by a mob after power conflicts with the royals. The monument marks the place where he was killed.

    de Witt monument in den Haag
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    De Plein - Cafés and monument of Willem I.

    by Airpunk Written Sep 13, 2005

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    The monument of Willem de Zwijger (william of Orange) dominates this place where you will find a lot of cafés. It is a place full of life, but the prices at the cafés are above average. In the background, you have old and new buildings of the Binnanhof, on the other side, you can see modern skyscrapers in the background.

    Willem I., modern architecture and the Caf��s Monument of Willem de Zwijger, father of the natio
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    'T Goude Hooft (Nice building from 17th century)

    by Airpunk Updated Sep 13, 2005

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    'T Goude Hooft is a restaurant situated in a building from 1660. Its origins date back to 1423. The building was completely refurbished in 1934. I haven't been in the restaurant, so I can't tell about the quality of the food. But the building is beautiful enough.

    't Goude Hooft
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    Binnenhof & Ridderzaal

    by Robert_Hun Written Apr 16, 2005

    The Binnenhof (Inner Court), including the Hall of Knights (Ridderzaal), is the center of Holland's political life and the official seat of government.
    The buildings on the left and right of the Ridderzaal are the first and second chamber of the parliament.
    In the center of the Binnenhof, Ridderzaal hosts the Queen's annual address (you can see the royal throne), the opening of the parliament and official receptions.

    Ridderzaal
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