Royal The Hague, The Hague

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  • Royal The Hague
    by ealgisi
  • Facade of the Palace Noordeinde
    Facade of the Palace Noordeinde
    by egonwegh
  • Paleis Noordeinde
    Paleis Noordeinde
    by penumbra
  • penumbra's Profile Photo

    Paleis Noordeinde – Northend Palace

    by penumbra Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Prince William of Orange at Paleis Noordeinde
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    Formerly known as the Old Court, the building became the Northend Palace in 1591 and is the official work and reception palace for Queen Beatrix. The Paleistuin (Palace Gardens) on the other side of the palace are open to the public and accessible via Prinsessewal. The statue (1845) is of Prince William of Orange on a horse.

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    WILLEM Van ORANJE

    by RoyJava Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    willem-van-oranje-statue-thehague

    Next to the Plaats/Place there is the Plein/Square with the famous statue of Prince Willem Van Oranje (1533 - 1584). Actually this nobleman Van Nassau-Stolberg got the name Oranje (Orange) because he got the area of Orange in France in 1544, still too young to reign the Dutch kingdom.

    He started the war against Spain, and got murdered in 1584. So his descendants were the family of Orange, the royal family of the Netherlands today. The statue (see the loyal dog at his right foot) got placed around 1848 in the middle of the square, where for now there is a huge parking place below his feet. The Plein/Square was a famous place to gather for the nobles in these days ...

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    Palace Noordeinde

    by benidormone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Palace Noordeinde
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    The palace was built in 1533 and is owned by the Royal family since 1584. This is the place where the queen had her working offices. When the flag is out, the queen is there. You can also visit the garden and the stables of the palace.

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  • nighthawk's Profile Photo

    Palace Noordeinde

    by nighthawk Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Palace Noordeinde

    This is the palace that Queen Beatrix uses for her work as head of the state. Members of foreign governments visit here.
    Originally designed by Jacob van Campen and Pieter Post.
    Across the road once stood a beautiful neo-gothic building but that has been torn down.

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    Palace 'Noordeinde'

    by Mique Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Place Noordeinde

    The 'Royal Palace Noordeinde' is one of many palaces in The Hague. It was build in 1533 and since 1584 it belongs to the Orange family (the Royal Family of the Netherlands). Between 1813 and 1940 it was the home of kings and queens. Now it is a so called "work-palace", where the queen works during the weekdays that she is in town. She also welcomes foreign heads of state and government leaders there. President Clinton for instance in 1998.

    The Palace burned down in the second decade of the 20th century. Luckily they rebuild it in the old style.

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  • Mique's Profile Photo

    Palace Noordeinde Facade

    by Mique Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Palace Noordeinde

    The front courtyard opens on to Noordeinde, the street after which the palace is named. On the street side the yard ends in railings and a gate made as part of a major restoration in the 1970s. The gate was modelled on the one erected here by Stadholder William III in 1689. Surmounted by the royal coat of arms, it is opened only for official occasions, such as receptions, "Prinsjesdag" - the day of the Queen's speech and the State opening of Parliament - and the presentation of letters of credence by newly appointed ambassadors.

    The offices of the Queen are located in the left wing of the palace.

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  • ealgisi's Profile Photo

    Noordeinde Palace

    by ealgisi Written Apr 9, 2008

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    Noordeinde Palace is one of the four official palaces of the Dutch royal family.

    Frederik Hendrik substantially enlarged the house, which was then known as the Oude Hof.
    After Frederik Hendrik died in 1647, his widow, Amalia van Solms, spent much of her time at the Oude Hof. Following her death in 1675, the house was more or less empty for many years. After the death of the Stadholder-King William III in 1702, it passed to King Frederick William of Prussia, a grandson of Frederik Hendrik’s.

    In 1901, Queen Emma moved to Lange Voorhout Palace today's Escher Museum, while Queen Wilhelmina and her husband Prince Hendrik remained at Noordeinde.

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    Paleis Noordeinde

    by didgeridorien Written Apr 24, 2007

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    The queen workes in this palace. This palace is used for public occasions, like saying goodbye to dead royalties and congratulating the family when a new baby is born. On 'prinsjesdag' (prince day) the government shows their new plans for the year and the royalties leave from here to the Ridderzaal (Knights court). Afterwards they appear on the balcony to wave to the people.

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    Paleis Noordeinde

    by margaretvn Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    Paleis Noordeinde
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    Stadhouder Frederik commissioned Jacob van Campen and Pieter Post to convert the old house into a palace in 1640. His mother had lived in the house. The house was converted into a classical style palace. It has been the property of the Princes of Orange since William V (1748-1806). Today it is the work palace of Queen Beatrix.
    Just across the road from the palace is this little dumpy statue of Queen Willemina. I am assured by Koos it looks just like her!

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    Knight's Hall

    by hassan_abu Written Jul 31, 2006

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    The Queen is head of state in the Netherlands.

    Dutch governments (and those of Nations that occupied the Netherlands) have been at this location in The Hague since 1581, although they moved to Delft for a short time during the 80 year war with Spain in the 16th & 17th century.

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    "Prinsjesdag".

    by VincentJJ Updated Sep 21, 2005

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    Prinsjesdag: what's it all about?
    The Queen and Dutch political leaders gather in the Knights Hall in The Hague every September as the historic building is transformed into a scene of pomp and glory. I will explain the history and significance of the nation's annual Prinsjesdag budget day.

    Every third Tuesday of September in the Netherlands is known as Prinsjesdag, a day in which the Dutch monarch, currently Queen Beatrix, addresses a joint sitting of the Lower House of Parliament and the Senate.

    It is held in the historic Hall of Knights (Ridderzaal) in The Hague and the Queen's Speech from the Throne outlines the main points of government policy for the coming year.

    Lower House MPs then gather in parliament, where the Finance Minister, presently Liberal VVD leader Gerrit Zalm, presents the budget and government financial estimates for the coming year.

    In years past, Prinsjesdag, or Prince's Day, was also used to open the annual session of parliament, but a revision of the Dutch Constitution in 1983 extended the parliamentary session from one year to four years, so the third Tuesday in September is no longer the official opening of parliament.

    Golden coach

    The Queen leaves in a horse-drawn golden coach from the Palace Noordeinde, the monarch's working palace, at 1pm and travels to the Hall of Knights in the centre of The Hague. Court dignitaries and a military guard of honour accompany her on the 30-minute journey.

    Members of the public also line the side of the roads to cheer and catch a glimpse of the Queen, while military salutes are fired at one-minute intervals to let the public know the carriage is en route.

    The royal procession travels from the palace past the Mauritshuis Museum through the Middenpoort (Middle Gate) and Grenadierspoort (Grenadiers' Gate) to the Binnenhof, where the parliamentary offices are located.

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    Huis Ten Boch - Where the Queen lives

    by Airpunk Written Sep 14, 2005

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    Huis Ten Bosch - seen from the main gate

    Huis Ten Bosch is a palace situated at the southeastern end of the city wood Haagse Bos. It was built in the 17th century. You won't see a lot of it as there are many security installations. Anyway, you can enjoy some time walking in the Haagse Bos and at least see where Queen Beatrix lives.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Stadpaleis Noordeinde - Office of the Queen

    by Airpunk Written Sep 13, 2005

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    Stadpaleis Noordeinde
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    Paleis Noordeinde was built in the 16th century and rebuilt in the 17th century. It was the residence of many royals, including Louis de Coligny, Prince Maurits and King Willem I. Today, it is the office building of Queen Beatrix, but she doesn't live there anymore (For that, see Huis ten Bosch). In fornt of the building, you will find another sculpture of Willem de Zwijger.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Plein 1813 - Square 1813

    by Airpunk Written Sep 13, 2005

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    The monument in the middle of Plein 1813

    Plein 1813 is the center of a former complex which was the residence of Willem I. The monument, which dominates the square, was built in the 19th century to remember the end of the french occupation in 1813.

    Today, the area is surrounded by ebassy buildings and villas, but the monument and the square are still impressive.

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  • Mique's Profile Photo

    More hall of Knights

    by Mique Updated Jul 6, 2005

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    Interior of the Hall of Knights

    I was suprised when i came in but on Dutch TV the Hall looks very big and when you enter you realise that they actually film with wide angle lenses from a stand just opposite the throne. Also the way people are positioned makes the long hall much bigger than it in fact it. On TV it looks like the long sides are actually the sides that make up the front and the back of the building.. Still it was much fun to finally be there and see the hall for myself..

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