Oslo Off The Beaten Path

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Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Oslo

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    Grønland

    by diocletianvs Updated Apr 25, 2005

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    Shop window in Gr��nland

    The area of Grønland was reclaimed from the sea in 17th Century and from that time this suburb of Christiania started to develop inhabited by craftsmen, workers and tradesmen.

    Today the area that starts eastwards from the shining skyscrapers of Radisson SAS hotel is also known as Little Karachi. Mostly inhabited by Oslo's vibrant immigrant community it is packed with small restaurants, shops and vegetable markets. Cafes along the Grønlandsleiret have vibrant scene and are popular both among the immigrants, students, artists and tourists looking for cheap beer. With the nearby Grünerløkka being more and more cleaned most locals think that Grønland will develop to a new hip area of Oslo.

    ***
    Walking distance from Oslo Sentralstasjon; or take tram #18, 19 to Bussterminalen Grønland or Munkegata.

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    Romsås metro station

    by diocletianvs Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Roms��s metro station

    Oslo's metro line number 5 hides one of the most unusual and most beautiful metro stations I've ever seen.

    Built in 1976 by an architect Håkon Mjelva this metro station was carved in granite stone and located into one of the natural underground caves. Stones are left intact and where interventions were needed (roofs, galleries, passages) they were made in pure concrete.

    Handrails and original signage is made of steel and colored in screaming red, making a great accent to prevailing grey colours of concrete and natural stone.

    This is a must see for all "beton brut" lovers, as well as those interested in urban traffic. (As I belong to both groups Romsås was high on my list of must see places in Oslo).

    To reach this station take metro #5 in direction Vestli. The ride from central Oslo takes 15-20 minutes.

    Please visit my Romsås metro station travelogue for more photos.

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    Paradise Bay

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 4, 2012

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    Paradise Bay (Paradisbukta)
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    The peninsula Bygdoy is home to many museums of Oslo. These are all located at the eastern side of Bygdoy, whereas the less touristy west side offers excellent sandy beaches and lovely rocky bays. The coastline is often referred to as Paradise Bay (Pardisbukta).

    Directions:
    Bygdoy can be reached by the public ferry no. 91 from the Radhuskaien or by bus no. 30.

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    Silo student housing

    by diocletianvs Updated Apr 25, 2005

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    Silo student dorm in Gr��nerl��kka

    Part of the urban renewal process of Grünerløkka are the efforts to create a student community here. Several faculties, including the Arts and Architectural ones were recently relocated here in former industrial buildings.

    One of the most innovative projects was conversion of the huge former grain silo into a trendy student housing. It is located in the center of Grünerløkka, close to the Akerselva river. I had a luck that one of my friends was living here so I visited her in her cool semi-circular room that had great views of the surrounding area and state-of-the-art furnishing.

    ***
    Grünerløkka studenthus
    Marselis gate 24, N-0551 Oslo

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    Gressholmen

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 4, 2012

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    Black bunnies of Gressholmen
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    One afternoon I took a public ferry to the island of Gressholmen which is located in the Oslo Fjord. The trip took about 15 minutes.

    Gressholmen with its green vegetation is a lovely place to take a rest from the busy city life. It is famous for its numerous small black bunnies. I saw many of them and they are not very frightened. So taking a photo is not too much of a problem.

    Directions:
    Gressholmen can be reached by the public ferry no. 93 from Vippetangen. Every public transportation ticket is valid on the public ferries. No extra charge is necessary.

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    Akerselva

    by diocletianvs Updated Apr 25, 2005

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    Akerselva

    Not as popular and known as Thames or the Seine, Oslo also has its river that divides the city into eastern and western parts. Maybe it is too ambitious to call Akerselva a river but it is a pleasant stream with nice green areas on both sides of its banks.

    The river starts at Maridalsvannet Lake and runs for about 5 kilometres through Oslo's neighbourhoods finally ending in underground canals as it reaches Grønland. If you start from the back side of the bus terminal and follow the Akerselva upstream along the parks you'll soon reach Grünerløkka neighbourhood, known as the Greenwich village of Oslo.

    Further north, the idyllic surroundings of the Maridalsvannet Lake are also worth visiting - bus 51 or 31 from Kjelsås station will bring you back to Jernbanetorget. Also trams 12 and 13 run on the streets that run parallel to Akerselva.

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    Oslo Holmenkollen Ski Jump

    by littlesam1 Updated Apr 19, 2005

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    The Olympics and Olympic history played a big part in our trip to Oslo. We saw the Sonia Henie memorial outside of Vigelslandparken. We travled to the site of the 1984 Olympics in Lillehammer. But one of the highlights of our visit to Oslo was the trip to the Holmenkollen Ski Jump. The Holmenkollen ski jump was the main arena for the 1952 Olympics in Oslo. The jump has been renovated and expanded many times over the years. There is a ski jump museum at the Holmenkollen site. We had a great time visiting here and enjoying the museum, the gift shop and taking too many pictures. I have some of them featured in a travelogue on this page. There is also an automated virtual ski jump ride you can enjoy at the museum. I decided to pass this by as I have a little problem with motion sickness from time to time and it looked quite wild.

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    Grünerløkka

    by diocletianvs Updated Apr 25, 2005

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    Streetart in Brennerveien

    Grünerløkka started to develop in 19th century as the result of intensive industrialisation. This worker's suburb was designed after Berlin's examples by an architect Georg Andreas Bull.

    Today this former working class area is known as the Greenwich Village of Oslo. The working class is replaced by artists, lawyers, students and moneymakers. Grünerløkka is a small town in itself within the great Oslo that retained a special identity. The area is now a charming mixture of worn down and beautifully renovated houses as well as green areas, small shops and cafés. Compared with places downtown, you can find many cheap shops along the Grünerløkka's main street - Markveien, as well as nice cafes and restaurants.

    Some places along the Akersleva river "belong" to alternative culture with squatters inhabitting former industrial buildings. The area has few interesing cafes and clubs, as well as some interesting user interventions in terms of street furniture and streetart.

    ***
    Trams 12, 13.

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    Holmenkollen Chapel

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 4, 2012

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    Holmenkollen Chapel
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    Just above the famous Holmenkollen ski jump arena a nice Norwegian wooden chapel (Holmenkollen Kapell) can be found.

    In summer time it is a bit hidden in the forest. It is well worth-seeing and as it is located on a little hill, the area around the chapel offers panoramic views of Oslo's city centre.

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    oslo's secret museum - Tomba Emmanuelle

    by SORHUS Updated May 30, 2005

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    its situated between old houses where people live and not in a typical museums area. emanuel vigeland was the youngest brother of gustav vigeland who created the famous vigelandspark

    emanuel was also an artist and he build this builiding for his art (sculptures, drawing and painting )and to be his future burial place.
    he build the door very small so u have to bow when u enter (u are bowing/lower ur head to his ashes)

    when u get inside u will get in a dark room and when ure eyes get use to the limited light u will see the walls and celling is filled with frescos and its dark and mystic
    its defently worth a visit

    Emanuel Vigeland Museum
    Grimelundsveien 8
    0775 Oslo
    Tel. +47 22 14 57 88
    Fax +47 24 12 92 20
    email: post@emanuelvigeland.museum.no

    access T-bane no. 1 Frognerseteren to Slemdal station. 7 mins. walk.
    Bus no. 46 to Grimelundsveien. 5 mins. walk.
    Parking facilities outside the museum.


    opening hours Sundays 12.00-4.00pm
    admission kr. 30,-
    other times can be arrange too for an extra fee

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    • Museum Visits
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    Visit Grünerløkka

    by Hildeal Updated Oct 14, 2011

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    Gr��nerl��:kka
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    Grunerløkka used to be an industry area. It used to be a working place area but now is one of the trendiest and coolest place to live.. Some people believe grünerløkka means the same thing for Oslo as Soho for NY. All types of people live here (foreigners, celebrities and Gays to mention something) Grunerløkka has some of the best cafe and restaurant life and markets where people of all skin colors live together.
    When you're here visit some of the pubs and restaurants (like Tørst( thirsty) and Sult (Hunger)

    Grünerløkka is an exciting place Especially when it comes to literature. it's so exiting that a big amount of our authors who write Crime novels( like Anne Holt) let their main person live in one of the famous streets in Grünerløkka like Toftesgate and Markveien.

    The writer Oskar Braaten who grew up here, described the life around the factories brilliantly in books, theatre plays like "ungen" (the Kid)

    Olav Ryes plass:

    this place has always been the heart of Grynerlø:kka. it's named after a war hero Olaf Rye who participated in the field parade against Sweden

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    Alexander Kiellands Plass

    by diocletianvs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Children playing in the new park

    Part of the urban renewal process of Grünerløkka was also creation of several parks and squares. This small triangle area was turned into a green oasis with the play of water as the main element.

    The Alexander Kiellands plass was designed by landscape architects Amund Johne, Lars Flugsrud, Åsa Hjorth and Askild Nilsen and features a fountain and a series of water steps that are obviously very popular among the local kids. After the construction of the park in 2001 many cafes and other businesses opened in surrounding houses creating a new urban focus in former industrial neighbourhood of Grünerløkka.

    Alexander Kiellands Plass is one of the best examples of the so called "low cost - high return" urban interventions and one of the most imaginative small urban spaces I've seen lately.

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    winter fun

    by SORHUS Updated Mar 11, 2007

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    take the tram up to frognerseteren (the last stop) go to the cafe get a hot chocolate to get warm, then go and hire tobuggans/sledges and ride down Korketrekker'n over 2 kilometer and the take the tram up again ...go again if u had fun or go and get another hot chocolate :-)

    video i found on the net from the run
    http://www.snutter.no/app/viewMovie.action?id=880

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    Frogner area

    by diocletianvs Updated Apr 25, 2005

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    Typical street in Frogner

    It is not by chance that most of the embassies are located in Drammensveien - one of the streets that leads westwards from the Royal Palace. Here we enter Frogner area that stretches between the Royal Palace and Vigelands park - one of the wealthiest neighbourhoods in Oslo. Here you'll find streets lined with treelines and nice, clean and beautiful architecture of the late 19th century houses.

    Further to the north lies similar area called Majorstua, linked with the center by Bogstadveien - one of the main shopping streets for people with gold and platinum credit cards. There is also a flea market every Saturday at Amaldus Nielsen plass.

    ***
    Tram 12 to Frogner; tram 19 to Majorstuen; Metro 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to Majorstuen

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    the waterfalls of Grünerløkka/aker river

    by Hildeal Updated Oct 14, 2011

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    4 more images

    The industrial revolution in Norway started at the Aker River around 1840. The river gave us the power to form the new industry.

    Before we could ever use the electricity, the fabric buildings had to be placed near the river place. A growing town meant more work and markets. The first fabrics made cloths paper and miller

    Even if there was a flourishmen of industry around the river , most of the workers lived in poverty. Their salary was low and almost no family could live on only one income.

    Most children in the working class families had to work outside home. Being a worker at the age of 10 was not unusual. The fabrics was a loudly place to be, it was dusty and full of pollution. And because of bad sanitation, all kind of sicknesses flourished. As a consequence of that , the kids did not have enough time for school work and sleep. in 1829 a new law finally came. A law which made it clear that kids under the age of 12 were not allowed to work at any fabric and they're were not allowed to work more than six hours each day.

    Related to:
    • School Holidays

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Oslo Off The Beaten Path

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