City Hall, Oslo

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    City Hall

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 4, 2012

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    Oslo City Hall (Radhus)

    The City Hall of Oslo (Radhus) was inaugurated in 1950, when the city celebrated its 900th anniversary.

    The modern twin-towered building is decorated with themes of Norwegian history and culture. The Nobel Peace Price is awarded here each December.

    Directions:
    The City Hall is located at Radhusplassen, just on the waterfront of the fjord.
    Tram: 10, 15 - Radhusplassen

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  • Bernd_L's Profile Photo

    City Hall

    by Bernd_L Updated May 29, 2006

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    Oslo's City Hall

    Oslo's city hall is one of the most popular landmarks of the city. This massive brick building facing Oslo's harbour was inaugurated in 1950 when Oslo celebrated its 900th anniversary.

    Although the building is used as offices for the cities administration you can visit it by a guided tour and see the interesting art works which decorate the hall and some of the rooms. Norwegian artists choose motifs from the Norwegian history, culture and working life.

    The city hall is also the location where the Nobel Peace Price is awarded every year on December 10.

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Oslo Radhus - Oslo City Hall

    by suvanki Updated Aug 4, 2007

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    City Hall, Oslo
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    This twin towered building is located by the waterfront and is the administrative and political heart of Oslo.

    In 1915, a programme of slum clearance was ordered by the then mayor, to clear the harbourside buildings, making way for the site for the new City Hall.

    Architects Arnstein Ameburg and Magnus Poulson took 10 years to modify their plans, with the foundation stone being laid in 1931. Apparently the twin towered building is inspired by the Nidaros Cathedral at Trondheim. There are conflicting opinions as to whether this building is aggresively ugly or a pride to Norway! Hmm, not too sure what I felt, but in the overcast sky and surrounded by snow, it looked quite austere.

    During the Nazi occupation of 1940 -45 building work was halted. (Artwork depicting Oslo during the occupation can be seen in the City Hall)

    Eventually the City Hall was inaugurated in 1950 during Oslos 900th anniversary.

    Oslo City Hall is famous for being the venue for the Ceremony to award the Nobel Peace Prize. (Held in the Main Hall)

    Although We didn't view inside, I understand that besides the afforementioned Occupation works, there are many early 20th century paintings , frescoes and sculptures by Norways leading artists.

    Outside on the steps are many impressive statues. Although the clock on the tower is highly visible, it is very basic in design. Around the back of the building (on the North side) is a more elaborately designed clock.

    Open daily 08.30 - 1600hrs (1700 in summer)

    Free admission except for summer months (11th May to 31st August)

    Adults 25NK, Children 15 NK

    Guided Tours Mon - Fri 10.00, noon and 1400hrs

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  • ginte's Profile Photo

    Oslo City Hall

    by ginte Written Feb 17, 2004

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    Oslo City Hall

    Looks nicer in the evening than in a day light. Architecture isn't very special, but the area in front of it it's really worth to see. Shores of Oslo with lots of nice ships, a Resistence Museum of the II World War, Tourist Information Center and nice sculptures in the square.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Rad hus (City Hall)

    by Jim_Eliason Written Sep 18, 2006

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    Rad hus  (City Hall)
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    The City Hall building is known for its trademark twin towers and also the elaborate reliefs and paintings on the outside and inside of the building. It's free to go inside and on the way to the harbor

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    radhuset

    by doug48 Written Aug 20, 2006

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    radhuset

    the radhuset, (city hall) is a huge brick building located in cental oslo. the building was opened in 1950 to commenorate the 900 th anniversary of the city. over 8,000,000 bricks were used in the construction of this building. the radhus hall is used for the presentation of the nobel peace prize. in the hall is henrik sorensen's oil painting, "work, art and celebration". this painting is the largest in europe. other interesting rooms are, the feast gallery, bystyre hall, and the banqueting hall.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Radhus

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Oct 18, 2005

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    Radhus

    The Radhus, the city hall of Oslo, is probably the most famous building of Oslo known in the world. It was built by the architects Arnstein Arneberg and Magnus Poulsson between 1933-1950 to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the founding of the city of Oslo. The City Hall combines national romanticism, classicism and functionalism. The foundation stone was laid in 1931. It has got a big main building and two big towers. The main building has got paintings made by Munch and Sorensen.
    Every year on 10th December the King of Norway give the Noble of the Peace in the Room of Parties.

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    Wooden friezes in the City Hall's courtyard

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Oct 1, 2005

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    Wooden friezes
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    In the City Hall's courtyard you can see some wooden friezes made by Dagfin Werenskiold (1892-1977). Werenskiold's artistic expressions span painting, friezes, sculputers, graphics, ceramics and glass painting that you can find in the National Gallery and in others exibitions.
    Most distinctive are his painted wooden friezes, where he continues an old Nordic tradition established in ecclesiastical and rural art.
    He has completed 16 wooden friezes on the walls of the courtyard. Werenskiold's motifs are from Norse mythology. Here we find ancient myths about creation, the life of godsm the sources of wisdom, about love, hate, war, destiny, revenge, the demise of old worlds and powers, and magnificaent visions of the future.
    There are two main historic sources: The Older Edda, which consists of divine and heroic poems, first recorded in the 13th century, and Snorre Sturlason's, written in prose circa 1220.

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    Alf Rolfesen's painting

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 1, 2005

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    Alf Rolfesen's painting
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    Alf Rolfesen's 265 square metres above the grand function room entrance give a representation from Norwegian industry. It is flanked on the left by Fridtjof Nansen, who sumbolises the nation's outward exploration. On the right, the 4.5 m portrait of the writer Bjornstjerne Bjornson represents spiritual expansion within. The length of the east wall features the Occupation Frieze.
    On the left you can see a men of the resistance taking to the forests. A plane lies in and a ship sunk. It represent the German occupation during the Second War World. On the right of the Gestapo's Victoria Terrasse, viewing from ruins, resistence fighters are stood against the execution cells. In front of them there is a concentration camp. The side walls are largely decorated with patterns using al secco technique.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Radhushallen

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 1, 2005

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    Radhushallen

    The decoration in Radhushallen is an eminent example of the joint artistry of Alf Rolfsen and Henrik Sorensen. The floor is in pale gray marble from Mosjoen, darker marble containg fossils from Poisgrunn and black kimestone from Elnes. Hanging on the east wall, Reider Auli's painting from 1950 of the emergence of the labour movement in Oslo. On the west wall, Karl Hogberg's picture dated 1949-50 depicts the development of the city's trade and industry.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Oslo Rådhusplassen - City Hall

    by littlesam1 Updated Apr 18, 2005

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    Oslo City Hall

    I once post a question of the Virtual Tourist Miscellaneous Forum asking what was the ugliest building you have seen. This is in no offense to the people of Oslo, but the Oslo City Hall got a lot of votes in that forum. I thought it was a bit unfair until I actually got to see the City Hall in Oslo. It is not a beautiful building. However it did grow on me after a while and I began to appreciate it a little before I left Oslo.

    The building is not far from the Royal Palace and Karl Johans Gate. It sits on the water front and kind of looms over the area. It is home to the Nobel prize presentations and has a fascinating history. It will catch your attention whether you like it or hate.

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    The site of the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize

    by Emmjai Updated Oct 24, 2003

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    City Hall, Oslo

    This wonderful piece of Architecture is beautiful front and back, unusual I think for many buildings. The front looks on to the harbour, while the back has an attractive water feature and clock, The City Hall in Oslo, is the 'home' of the Nobel Prize for Peace. All the other Nobel Prizes are awarded in Stokholm. but for reasons I am not entirely sure, the Peace Prize giving ceremony takes place here.

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  • prleprle's Profile Photo

    City Hall and Peace!

    by prleprle Updated Jan 18, 2004

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    Oslo City Hall, Norway

    Well, Oslo City Hall, bulding made of red bricks is not my favourite building. On the waterfront overlooking the fjord, this modern twin-towered building opened in 1950, to celebrate the city’s 900th anniversary. However, interior with frescos is much nicer than exterior. This is where the Nobel Peace Prize is presented each December.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Wooden friezes in the City Hall's courtyard (1)

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 1, 2005

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    Wooden friezes
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    Each frieze is made by pine deck timber which is glued together into blocks weighing approzimately 1000 Kg. the friezes are impregnated with a triple application of linseed oil, then painted and gilded with gold or silver.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Radhus: Werenskiold's worlks

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Oct 18, 2005

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    Great Staircase
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    In the Oslo City Hall there are others works made by Werenskiold: he made the marble frieze above the fountain that you can see in the Grand Hall. The great staircase is decorated with stylised seagulls, sculpted in open-work marble. the banisters bear a relief paraphrasing the city arms with two swans as shield-beareres, created by Arne Durban.

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