Vikingship Museum - Viking Skip Museum, Oslo

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  • Vikingship Museum - Viking Skip Museum
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  • Vikingship Museum - Viking Skip Museum
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  • darkjedi's Profile Photo

    Vikings Ahoy

    by darkjedi Updated Nov 8, 2008

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    In the Viking Ship Museum there are grave finds from Tune, Gokstad, Oseber and Borre.

    In the Viking Ship Museum you enter and face the Oseberg Ship. If you walk past the ship, you reaches the centre of the museum (a large cross), with artefacts from the Oseberg discovery right in front, the Gokstad Ship to the left and the Tune Ship to the right. The Museum also has a balcony that is open to the public with a beautiful view from above of the Oseberg Ship and Gokstad Ship.

    I know its one of Norway's most famous museums but it comes across as an 'old' museum. Stuffy exhibits and items in display cases. There is no doubt of the majesty of the finds they have here especially the fantastic ships, but they could be displayed so much better.

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  • SailorRoar's Profile Photo

    Not one but two real Vikingships +++

    by SailorRoar Written Jun 15, 2008

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    The Oseberg Ship
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    The Vikingship museum at Bygdøy is located right next to the Folk Museum. I would absolutly reccomend seeing this museum. The museum have 2 complete vikingships and one wreck. These ships are the real thing, they are not replicas, they are from the viking age (year 800-1000 after Christ). The Viking Kings in Norway was burried with their ships, beds, houses, wagoons etc (yes the graves where huge). The 3 ships (Gokkstad ship, Oseberg ship and Tune ship) in these museums have been found in these sorts of graves. It is an amazing feeling to see that our fathers over 1000 years ago, where able to bould these amazing ships and navigate across the worlds oceans, and that the ships are still intact today, after beeing burried in the earth for about 1000 years. It would have been interessting to se what we make in this world today that will still be around after year 3000.

    Don't miss out on the Vikingship museum :)

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  • dfactor's Profile Photo

    Viking skip museum

    by dfactor Updated Jan 6, 2008

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    Very nice ancient ships they got here! There are 3 ships here, Tune, Gokstad and probably the most well-preserved, Oseberg ship (the one you see immediately upon entering the museum)! Apart from the ships, you can also see the stuff they found on board the ships, like jewellery, tools, harness, household utensiles, smaller boats, textiles, sledges and a wonderfully ornamented carts. Also, remains of animals for the after life. Apparently, the Vikings used these ships as burial when they were the kings of the sea and throughout the Scandinavia.

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  • EstherM's Profile Photo

    Awesome!

    by EstherM Written Sep 19, 2007

    Don't miss this museum. I mean DON"T MISS! If you think you can imagine the viking ships from pictures of books, you are wrong! When you walk into this place there is an unearthed restored full size viking ship. It is so incredible, it will imprint on your mind forever.

    Also here are some other ships and many treasures that were buried with these ships. The museum building is constructed as the ideal setting for the ships. Bring your wide angle lens for your camera.

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  • Karl_Kaviar's Profile Photo

    Vikingskipshuset

    by Karl_Kaviar Written Apr 27, 2007

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    The Viking Ship Museum (in Norwegian Vikingskipshuset - The Viking Ship House) is located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway. It is part of the Museum of Cultural History of the University of Oslo, and houses the Viking ships from Tune, Gokstad, and Oseberg. Also on display are finds from the mound cemetery at Borre.

    A separate building for finds from the Viking age discovered at the end of the 19th and beginning of 20th century was first proposed by Swedish professor Gabriel Gustafson in 1913. At the time, the Gokstad and Oseberg ships had already been stored for several years in temporary shelters at the University of Oslo. An architectural contest was announced, and Arnstein Arneberg won. The hall for the Oseberg ship was built with funding from Stortinget, and the ship was moved from the University shelters in 1926.

    The parts of the building for the ships from Gokstad and Tune were completed in 1932, but the last part of the building was delayed due to World War II. The last part for the other finds from Oseberg was completed in 1957.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    viking ship museum

    by doug48 Written Aug 20, 2006

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    viking burial chamber

    the vikingskipshuset, (viking ship museum) contains two of the world's best preserved viking ships. these ships are over 1000 years old. pictured is a viking burial chamber dating back to 900 AD. also on display is the oseberg wagon, the only viking wagon known to exist. a must see site when visiting oslo.

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  • Bernd_L's Profile Photo

    Viking Ship Museum

    by Bernd_L Updated May 30, 2006

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    In this museum you can see three large boats from the Viking period. These ships were used in burial mounds to carry their royal owners to heaven. Two of them are in a very good condition so you could imagine to use them instantly.

    Besides these ships you can see some findings from the graves (carved sledges, arms, textiles, tools and kitchen utilities) on display.

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  • xantylaol's Profile Photo

    The Viking Ship Museum

    by xantylaol Written May 3, 2006

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    Viking Ship
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    The Viking Ship Museum displays the large Viking ships Oseberg, Gokstad and Tune, as well as founds from the chief grave at Borre in the Vestfold district. The three ships are the best preserved Viking ships known, found in royal burial mounds in the Oslo fjord.
    The viking ships were very effective ocean vessels and the Vikings are widely acclaimed to be the first to discover the Americas - 500 years before Christopher Columbus. See the below links for more information.

    The Museum - http://www.norway.com/directories/d_company.asp?id=671

    About the Vikings in general and the discovery of the Americas:

    http://www.cdli.ca/CITE/v_lanse.htm

    http://www.win.tue.nl/cs/fm/engels/discovery/viking.html

    http://historymedren.about.com/od/vikingsscandinavia/

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  • Lauki's Profile Photo

    Viking Ships!

    by Lauki Updated Nov 2, 2005

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    Clearly the #1 thing to see in Oslo is the Viking Ship museum. There are only three in here but I could have spent all day gazing at them. The museum is shaped like a church and it makes for a great presentation. I read that the ships will be moved to a new museum at some point but for now they are on the Bydogy penninsula, a beautiful place with this, the Open Air Folk Museum and a few other attractions. This a fantastic place to spend a day in Oslo.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Vikingskipene

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Oct 22, 2005

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    Vikingskipene
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    The wonderful House of the Viking boats was built in the 1926-1932 and inside it there are three original ships. The three Viking ships, from Oseberg, Gokstad and Tune, were all found in burial mounds in the Oslo Fjord Area. they were excavated between 1867 and 1904. They were built during the 9th century AD, and later used as burial ships for wealthy men and women. In the Oseberg ship lay a woman and her slave girl, who had been buried in about 850 AD. Each of the other two ships held a man. They were both buried in 900 AD.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    The Gokstad burial chamber and small boats

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 6, 2005

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    Gokstad burial chamber
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    Each of the three Viking ships had a wooden burial chamber that had been raised on deck behind the mast. They were all tent-like structures, probably designed to resemble the tents used on land. Real tents were also found aboard the ships.
    The three small boats found in the Gokstad ship were all broken to pieces, probably in connection with the burial ceremony.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    The Tune Ship

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 6, 2005

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    The Tune Ship
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    The Tune ship was found in a large burial mound on the Haugen farm in Ostfold, and excavated in 1867. the Tune ship dates from about the same time as the Gokstad ship (ca 900 AD), and also contains the remains of a man of high rank. This chieftain had been placed in a wooden burial chamber built on board the ship, but his grave gifts have not survived due to poor preservation conditions. The ship itself is severely damaged.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    The Gokstad ship

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 5, 2005

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    The Gokstad ship
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    The Gokstad ship was found in a large burial mound on the Gokstad farm in Vestfold, and excavated in 1880. It was built around 890 AD, and later used as a grave ship for a Viking chieftain. the body lay in a grave chamber built of horizontal timber logs.
    The Gokstad ship burial was plundered by grave robbers in ancient time who probably removed all objects of gold or silver. In the museum you can see some of remaining Gokstad finds.
    The Gokstad ship is 24 meters long with room for 32 oarsmen. It is the largest of the Viking ship on display and also the most robust. Compared with the Oseberg ship, we see that the keel and keelson are larger and more solidly constructed, the side planking higher, and that, when sailing, the oar holes could be closed and sealed using wooden flaps. During excavation, archaeologists found the remains of 64 shields which had been arrached to the outside railings. While the Oseberg ship was a luxury pleasure craft, the Gokstad was a sturdy and practical vessel, capable of sailing the high seas.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    The Oseberg Ship

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 5, 2005

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    The Oseberg Ship
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    The Oseberg ship was found in a large burial mound on the Oseberg farm, in Vestfold in 1904. The ship was built sometime between 815-820 AD, but was later used as a grave ship for a woman of high rank who died in 834 AD. The woman had been placed in a wooden burial chamber on the aft deck of the ship.
    The burial mound was constructed of layers of turf which preserved both the ship, and its rich contents of wooden objects, leather and textiles. The burial mound was plundered by grave robbers in ancient times and it is probably the reason why no jewellery or gold or silver objects were found in the grave.
    The 22 meter long ship was built of oak. The number of oar holes indicates thet the ship was rowed by a crew of 30 men. The ship had no seats, and the oarsmen probably sat on their own wooden ship's chests. The oars could be drawn in when the square starboard side. The Oseberg ship is less solidly constructed than the Gokstad ship. It was probably a royal pleasure craft used for short journeys in calm waters.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Vikingskipene: the graves

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Oct 5, 2005

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    Wooden statue
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    In the ships the dead were placed in a burial chamber which was erected in the stern of the ship. They were buried with a good supply of food and drink, horses and dogs, and both useful and decorative objects. When the ship were excavated, the graves were found to have been robbed, and the jewelry, weapons, gold and silver were no longer there. The objects made of wood and cloth were well preserved, because the ships had been buried in blue clay and covered with stones, clay and turf.

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