Bukowina Tatrzanska Things to Do

  • Cemetery with the view
    Cemetery with the view
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  • Entrance to the cemetery
    Entrance to the cemetery
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  • On the way out of Bukowina
    On the way out of Bukowina
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Most Recent Things to Do in Bukowina Tatrzanska

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    The old wooden church

    by evaanna Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    The old church in Bukowina
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    Bukowina Tatrzanska has two churches: a wooden one dedicated to the Holiest Heart of Jesus and consecrated in 1887 and a modern one, much bigger and rising high but not so charming as the little one. But the village congregation had grown so much that they could not possibly remain in the smaller building.
    The old church was designed and built by one pious local man, Jedrzej Kramarz, who also carved the statues for the main altar which can now be seen by the entrance to the old church. The wooden building is still used for concerts and smaller gatherings. In front of it stands the carved statue of a saint.
    The two churches stand side by side and share the cemetery, which commands a beautiful view of the hill right across the valley.

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    Zakopane, the capital of the Polish Tatras

    by evaanna Updated Dec 1, 2007

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    On Gubalowka, Zakopane
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    It may seem a little strange to put Zakopane, the capital of the Podhale region under Bukowina, its smaller and less important sister. But as I am not going to write a separate page on Zakopane, where I have been many times but of which I have only black and white photos, I just want to signal that Zakopane is within half an hour bus ride from the village and all the places of interest there are accessible from Bukowina as well. First of all, if you are a snob, a walk in Krupowki, the main street of Zakopane, is an absolute must. Here you can meet many people of some importance in Poland, famous actors, writers, politicians and other members of the elite. Browse through the souvenir shops, have a picture taken of you or your child with a highlander in traditional dress or dressed up as a bear, let an artist draw a portrait of yourself and visit one of the numerous restaurants to try the local dishes. And don't forget to buy some cakes at the bakery next to the Post Office to take home with you. Poppyseed sticks for tea on your verandah in Bukowina will boost your energy after the tiring day in town. You can take a ride in an elegant horse-drawn carriage, expensive but what the heck, you don't have the chance to do it every day. And to complete the day trip, you may take the train up Gubalowka to admire the panorama of the Tatras. On the way there you will come across numerous stalls selling souvenirs: hand-knitted sweaters and gloves, decorative leather bags and slippers and lots of woodwork. Try the homemade sheep cheese 'oscypek', a local specialty. You will need to come again if you want to hike in the mountain valleys around Zakopane or climb the mountains, in fact even a week or two wouldn't be enough to see it all, so treat this first visit as just an introduction to this great place.

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    Walk to the Glodowka Mountain Glade

    by evaanna Updated Feb 16, 2006

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    View from Glodowka Glade
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    This is, or used to be, a lovely walk of 3 km one way but considerably uphill so it's better to make a stop or two on the way. You walk up the main winding road from the roundabout in the direction of Lake Morskie Oko. I said it used to be lovely because the traffic has now made it considerably less so. On both sides of the road you have spruce forest but also some mountain meadows where the highlanders gather hay a few times a year. From time to time you get great views of the Tatras and, looking to the far left even of the Pieniny but the best view awaits you at your destination. There is a restaurant just before the glade, where you can later have lunch but don't stop here yet. The proper glade is round the next bend, going down this time. The view is stunning: all the Tatras lie there before you, including the Slovak ones. Just try to be there on a clear day, the glade can sometimes be engulfed in fog so that you can't see anything. On most days there is a highlander sitting there selling some locally made souvenirs: hand-knitted sweaters, cardigans, socks and gloves, decorative carved wooden plates or spoons, embroidered slippers and many more.
    Climb the hill there to get a better view. The stone building at the top belongs to the Polish scouts, but it also serves as hotel.
    If you don't like walking along the asphalt road, the glade can be reached via Rynias, a tiny village near Bukowina, but then you will have to negotiate a long steep path just before Glodowka. And of course, you can come here by car from Bukowina. Parking is free.

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    Pilgrimage to Lake Morskie Oko

    by evaanna Updated Feb 5, 2006

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    Listed hostel  by Lake Morskie Oko

    Morskie Oko, the largest and best-known of all the Tatra lakes, is situated 1395 m a.s.l. Its name, which can be translated as Sea Eye, comes from an old legend claiming that it has an underground connection with the sea, hundreds of miles away. Surrounded by the highest peaks of the Polish Tatras, like Rysy (2499 m), and with the characteristic silhouette of Mnich (the Monk) it offers a fantastic view of the mountains and is a good starting point for trekkers as many interesting but also difficult marked trails start here. But ordinary tourists do not go that far. Having left their car or got off the bus at Palenica Bialczanska, they first have to walk, or ride in a horse-drawn carriage, to Wlosienica, a clearing from which they can only walk to the lake itself. Don't expect the feel of great mountain peace on the way: the place is an object of real pilgrimage - school and other organised trips, holiday camps with children running around and shouting, individual tourists en masse all make their way for the famous lake. If you look around, you may sometimes see chamois grazing in the meadow nearby. As you walk, nothing prepares you for the view in store till, all of a sudden, the lake appears in front of you in all its majestic splendour, with the high mountains reflected in its pure blue water as in a mirror. To satiate your eyes with its beauty you can go down and sit on one of the boulders by the water or take a walk around the lake. Some tourists climb to Czarny Staw (Black Pond) at the other end of the lake. Or, if you are hungry or cold, visit the restaurant at the listed hostel there and admire the view from the verandah. Before you leave, don't forget to drop a coin into the lake and, sooner or later, you will be back.
    The picture in this tip has been taken from the Internet, mine are black and white.

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    Sabala Folk Festival

    by evaanna Updated Jan 27, 2006

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    In front of the Folk Art Centre, Bukowina
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    Sabala, whose real name was Jan Krzeptowski, was a 19th century storyteller, poet, musician and Tatra lover from Zakopane. If you happen to be in Zakopane around mid-August don't miss the Festival named after him that takes place in the Folk Centre (Dom Ludowy) of Bukowina then. It's a festival and competition of storytellers, folk musicians of the mountainous regions of Poland, with some local theatre added. Even if you don't speak Polish and can't understand the storytellers - some Poles wouldn't understand their dialects either - come to see it for the colourful folk costumes, the folk art fair in front of the Folk Centre and the parade afterwards. And they don't do it just for the tourists, or not only. Polish highlanders' culture is thriving against all odds. An unforgettable spectacle!

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    Walk to the Bialka River via Brzegi

    by evaanna Written Jan 16, 2006

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    Brzegi near Bukowina
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    On this rather long, at least 4 km walk to the Bialka River and Jurgow you will pass two traditional villages - Brzegi and Jurgow. First, you must walk up along Tatrzanska St., and just past the last house in Bukowina take a road to the left leading to Brzegi. In Brzegi take the turning to the left at the forks and follow the main road. On the right you will be accompanied by a mountain brook flowing to the Bialka River. The village is quite interesting; the yards open onto the road so you can watch the villagers going about their everyday activities. Once, when we were there at Easter, we could see the doll of Judas hanging on a tree by the brook. That's how the local people say goodbye to winter.
    There are some artists living in the village and you can try and buy some carved works of folk art from them, including wooden spoons and forks and other kitchen utensils. You should pay much less there than in the shops.
    Walk on till you come to the river, where you can enjoy the lovely view and wade in the icy cold water, nice and cooling in the summer. The stony banks overgrown by the spruce forest are an excellent place for a picnic. When you have had your rest, cross the wooden bridge to get to Jurgow and take the road to the left. Don't miss the decorative carved verandahs and balconies of the old houses and the timber church. From here you can either take the bus back to Bukowina or walk on to Czarna Gora with a gypsy village, where you can see lots of gypsy children playing and looking after each other on the river banks. The gypsies of Czarna Gora are assimilated into the local community, have jobs and don't beg, and they certainly add colour to the village. There may be another reason for walking to Czarna Gora rather than waiting for a bus at Jurgow. The buses from Jurgow are few and far between while there are more of them from Czarna Gora. You can also walk back to Bukowina but you will be going uphill and it's a long walk, especially if, as we often did, you stay somewhere near the top of the village.

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    Rusinowa Mountain Glade

    by evaanna Updated Jan 14, 2006

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    View of the Tatras from Rusinowa Polana
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    The Rusinowa Mountain Glade is one of the most beautiful places in the Tatras accessible from Bukowina. The view from there is stunning - the whole panorama of the High Tatras is right before you. You can sit on one of the boulders lying there and look and look .... The more ambitious can climb the mountain called Gesia Szyja or Goose's Neck because of the way it looks from a distance to get an even better view. But the grass there can be quite slippery, so you will need good shoes. There is a shepherd's hut "Bacowka" in the glade where you can buy 'oscypek' or smoked sheep cheese made on the spot. You can try and persuade the highlander to put you up there on some hay in the loft, which can be reached by ladder. Just imagine waking up in the morning to the brisk clear air and to the great silence of the mountains before you and then washing in the icy cold water of the brook there. Unforgettable experience!
    You can walk to the Wiktorowki Chapel nearby, one of the favourite places of Pope John Paul II, where the highlanders sometimes attend Mass. On 15th August they all come here dressed in their colourful traditional costumes to celebrate Our Lady's, their patron's, day. It's a whole pilgrimage as everybody feels they must be there on that day.
    A word of warning: the path leading to the chapel from the glade can be muddy and slippery, especially after rain. To get back to the main road you can now take the path down to Zazadnia.
    To get to Rusinowa Polana from Bukowina, take a bus to Wierch Poroniec (on the way to Morskie Oko Lake, one stop after the Glodowka Glade) and walk along a marked trail from there. On the way you pass a brook with a waterfall. The road is stony and muddy at places with tree roots making the walking difficult. Once I was there with a tourist group in horse-drawn carts, but preferred to walk all the way back, it was so bumpy.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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