Centennial Hall - Hala Stulecia, Wroclaw

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  • Hala Stuleica, my Polish buddy and me
    Hala Stuleica, my Polish buddy and me
    by Airpunk
  • Pavillon of the Four Domes
    Pavillon of the Four Domes
    by Airpunk
  • Hala Stulecia
    Hala Stulecia
    by Airpunk
  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Hala Stulecia (Hala Ludowa, Jahrhunderthalle)

    by Airpunk Updated Jun 11, 2013
    Hala Stulecia
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    The „Centennial Exhibition“ of 1913 was held to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Prussia's Vicory over Napoleon. At that time, Wroclaw was part of the German Empire and better known under its German name Breslau. The centerpiece of the exhibition grounds was the Centennial Hall (Jahrhunderthalle, Hala Ludowa or Hala Stulecia). The hall was inspired by Festhalle in Frankfurt but has a larger dome made of concrete. As an early representative of reinforced concrete architecture, it was declared an UNESCO World Heritage site in 2006.

    There is an excellent permanent exhibition about the hall with information in Polish, English and German. At the end of the exhibition you can have a look into the main hall from a balcony. This part of Hala Stulecia is called discovery center and has a separate website. Guided tours are available upon request, entry fee is 12 PLN for adults (as of 2013), check their page for concessions and opening times.

    Outside have a look at the fountain and the pergola. From the old entrance hall, only the pillars remain. The Pavillon of the Four Domes (Pawilon Czterech Kopuł) was built for the 1913 exhibition as well and will house the Museum of Modern Art once the refurbishment is completed. The sculpture in front of the Pavillon is called Iglica (needle) and was the centerpiece of an 1948 exhibition held here to celebrate the regained Polish control over Silesia and other territories after WWII.

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    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Hala Stulecia (Hala Ludowa, Jahrhunderthalle)

    by Airpunk Written Jun 11, 2013

    The „Centennial Exhibition“ of 1913 was held to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Prussia's Vicory over Napoleon. At that time, Wroclaw was part of the German Empire and better known under its German name Breslau. The centerpiece of the exhibition grounds was the Centennial Hall (Jahrhunderthalle, Hala Ludowa or Hala Stulecia). The hall was inspired by Festhalle in Frankfurt but has a larger dome made of concrete. As an early representative of reinforced concrete architecture, it was declared an UNESCO World Heritage site in 2006.

    There is an excellent permanent exhibition about the hall with information in Polish, English and German. At the end of the exhibition you can have a look into the main hall from a balcony. This part of Hala Stulecia is called discovery center and has a separate website. Guided tours are available upon request, entry fee is 12 PLN for adults (as of 2013), check their page for concessions and opening times.

    Outside have a look at the fountain and the pergola. From the old entrance hall, only the pillars remain. The Pavillon of the Four Domes (Pawilon Czterech Kopuł) was built for the 1913 exhibition as well and will house the Museum of Modern Art once the refurbishment is completed. The sculpture in front of the Pavillon is called Iglica (needle) and was the centerpiece of an 1948 exhibition held here to celebrate the regained Polish control over Silesia and other territories after WWII.

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  • Ben-UK's Profile Photo

    Centennial Hall & Szczytnicki Park

    by Ben-UK Written Nov 29, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Centennial Hall, Wroclaw
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    About 3km to the east of the Rynek you can visit the Centennial Hall and the beautiful Japanese Garden in Szczytnicki Park. The reinforced concrete hall was constructed in 1913 and the architect was Max Berg - the hall was included in the UNESCO World Heritage of Culture List in 2006. next to the hall is a large lake with water fountains and it'a a very pleasant place to wander around. If you go, do go into the Japanese Gardens (3zl entrance in 2011) and walk along the many paths amongst delightful flowers and trees and cross the wooden bridges over the lakes.

    To get there you can take a tram and get off at HALA LUDOWA (STULECIA) stop - it takes about 20 minutes from the city centre :-
    from Galeria Dominikanska tram nos: 2, 4 and 10 towards Biskupin

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  • AgnusRafferty's Profile Photo

    Hala Stulecia (Centennial Hall)

    by AgnusRafferty Updated Aug 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wroclaw - Centennial Hall

    The Centennial Hall, a landmark in the history of reinforced concrete architecture, was erected in 1911-1913 by the architect Max Berg as a multi-purpose recreational building, situated in the World Exhibition Grounds. In form it is a symmetrical quatrefoil with a vast circular central space that can seat some 6,000 persons. The 23m-high dome is topped with a lantern in steel and glass.

    It was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • wroclawiak's Profile Photo

    Centennial Hall in Wroclaw on World Heritage List

    by wroclawiak Written Sep 22, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Centennial Hall
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    Text from: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1165

    The Centennial Hall (Jahrhunderthalle in German and Hala Ludowa in Polish), a landmark in the history of reinforced concrete architecture, was erected in 1911-1913 by Max Berg, at the time municipal architect in Breslau, as the Polish city of Wroc³aw was called at the time, when it was part of Germany. The Centennial Hall, a multi-purpose recreational building, is a centrally-planned structure situated on the Exhibition Grounds. The structure of the Centennial Hall is a symmetrical quatrefoil form with a vast circular central space (65m diameter, 42m high) that can seat some 6,000 persons. The 23m-high dome is topped with a lantern in steel and glass. The windows are made of exotic hardwood and, in order to improve the acoustics, the walls are covered with an insulating layer of concrete mixed with wood or cork. The elevations have no decoration or ornament, but the exposed concrete texture is marked with the imprints of the wooden formwork. On the west side of the Centennial Hall is a monumental square modelled like an ancient forum. On its north side is the Four-Dome Pavilion designed by architect Hans Poelzig in 1912 to house an historical exhibition. In the northern section of the Exhibition Grounds, Poelzig designed a concrete pergola surrounding an artificial pond. Adjacent to the entrance is the office building of the company administrating the Exhibition Grounds (Breslauer Messe A.G.), built in 1937 to the design by Richard Konwiarz. A monumental gateway leading to the forum, is in the form of a colonnade with reinforced concrete columns, designed by Max Berg in 1924. The Centennial Hall is a pioneering work of modern engineering and architecture, which exhibits an important interchange of influences in the early 20th century, becoming a key reference in the later development of reinforced concrete structures.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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